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By Chicago Tribune | May 25, 1994
CHICAGO -- Chicago public school officials have begun investigating a teacher at a West Side school who is accused of administering a math test that included references to prostitutes, drug dealers and car thieves.Charles Routen, 45, a first-year teacher, was removed from his sixth-grade teaching job and placed in an administrative position until school officials complete their investigation, schools spokeswoman Dawne Simmons said.A test Mr. Routen allegedly administered to his sixth-grade class Friday included such word problems as: "Martin wants to cut his half-pound of heroin to make 20 percent more profit.
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NEWS
November 8, 2013
When Common Core surfaced, minus its testing, student reading and math test scores plunged and are predicted to do so again this semester ( "Maryland students show no significant gains on national tests," Nov. 7). Further, teachers initially received directions to teach critical thinking across curriculum, without instruction as to how to do so, and they learned that their job evaluations depended on positive outcomes. Some then asked students, without having read it, to act out Homer's "The Odyssey" and told them that would be on the test.
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NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2002
Eighth-grader Janay Castle has taken the practice Maryland Functional Math Test at least four times on this day from her seat in the computer lab at Baltimore's Lombard Middle School. Twice, she passed. Twice, she didn't. Now, she has decided to take the exam once more -- this time, for real. "You sure?" asks Michael Smith, one of two eighth-grade math teachers at Lombard who have been spearheading an end-of-year push to raise the pass rate on the mandatory state exam. "I'm not trying to make you nervous."
NEWS
November 1, 2013
On Nov. 1, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits (also known as food stamps) will be reduced, creating ramifications beyond the already incomprehensible fact that more than one in eight central Maryland residents (and one in five children) is food insecure. The impact of these cuts will ripple throughout our communities and our economy well into the future. The Sun wisely pointed out in its Oct. 30 editorial ("Hunger gets a boost" that retailers, distributors, truck drivers and particularly farmers will be hurting as a result of the SNAP reductions.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer | December 9, 1992
Middle school principals and school administrators are pledging renewed efforts to boost functional math test scores and improve students' math skills.The pledge came in response to the recent Maryland School Performance report card, in which seven county middle schools failed to pass the functional math test.Middle school principals, meeting with the math coordinator and the middle school director yesterday, said they would discuss new strategies with their math departments. They plan to meet again in January.
NEWS
August 20, 1993
Anne Arundel County high school seniors' scores improved this year on the Scholastic Aptitude Test, with a gain of nine points on both the math and verbal portions of the test.Countywide, the average score on the verbal portion of the test was 435, compared to 426 points earned by last year's graduates. The statewide average this year was 431.On the math portion of the test, Anne Arundel seniors averaged 493 points, compared to 484 points scored by 1992 graduates. The statewide average score on the math test was 478.The SAT is used to predict a student's ability to succeed in the first year of college and is an admissions requirement for many colleges and universities.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2005
While Harford County pupils overall chalked up impressive results on state math and reading tests, administrators fear that some schools might not meet state standards for improvement. Superintendent Jacqueline C. Haas said she is particularly concerned about test scores of low-income middle-schoolers. Maryland School Assessment scores released last week showed that at Aberdeen, Edgewood and Magnolia middle schools, more than two-thirds of eighth-graders failed the math test. More than 40 percent of the same pupils failed the reading test.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2002
Science and math instruction in Baltimore County schools is getting a boost from a five-year, $13 million federal grant targeted at the district's poorest-performing students. The grant from the National Science Foundation will pay for advanced training for 1,800 math and science teachers from low-performing schools near the city line, and will help those schools recruit talented teachers. It also will fund weekend and summer programs to help poor-performing students -- many of whom are minorities -- with their math and science studies.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Mary Maushard and Kris Antonelli and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1998
Anne Arundel County high school seniors scored above the state and national averages on the SAT college admission test, continuing a six-year trend.Fifty-five percent of the seniors in the 1998 class took the test, said school officials, who credited a strong instructional program and a SAT preparation course available to sophomores, juniors and seniors."
NEWS
April 27, 2009
Taking a bite out of the bed-bug problem With bed-bug infestations on the rise across the country, the Baltimore City Health Department has begun a campaign to increase awareness of the problem. The department's Healthy Homes Division began conducting bedbug inspections in December and has been working with the city Housing Authority to respond to complaints and minimize infestations, says Assistant Health Commissioner Madeleine Shea. Shea says the city's 311 nonemergency number last year received 26 times more calls for bed-bug problems that it did four years ago. To help combat the problem, the city has developed brochures and public service announcements and met with school health officials, In June, health workers will be conducting a door-to-door campaign to educate residents about the problem.
NEWS
November 2, 2011
A report this week that Maryland students made greater gains on national reading and math tests than their peers in nearly every other state is the clearest sign yet that the decade-long effort to increase school funding and make teachers and principals more accountable is working. The National Assessment of Educational Progress, informally known as the Nation's Report Card, is the only standardized exam that allows student performance to be compared across states, and the results clearly show that Maryland's concerted school reform efforts have pushed its students toward the head of the class.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie , liz.bowie@baltsun.com | December 9, 2009
Baltimore's students scored better than expected on a rigorous national math test that compared their achievement to students in other large, urban school districts, indicating that a decade of reform may have helped lift the city's once-troubled schools. The city took a chance when it volunteered to be one of the 18 school districts where the National Assessment of Educational Progress is given to measure urban school performance. A bad result could have deflated the good news the district has touted recently on the easier state tests and reduced the power of leaders to continue to push for radical changes.
NEWS
April 27, 2009
Taking a bite out of the bed-bug problem With bed-bug infestations on the rise across the country, the Baltimore City Health Department has begun a campaign to increase awareness of the problem. The department's Healthy Homes Division began conducting bedbug inspections in December and has been working with the city Housing Authority to respond to complaints and minimize infestations, says Assistant Health Commissioner Madeleine Shea. Shea says the city's 311 nonemergency number last year received 26 times more calls for bed-bug problems that it did four years ago. To help combat the problem, the city has developed brochures and public service announcements and met with school health officials, In June, health workers will be conducting a door-to-door campaign to educate residents about the problem.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Sun reporter | September 26, 2007
Maryland students made gains in reading and math on the most recent national tests, in some cases outpacing strides made in other states. In three of the four tests given in the spring, Maryland ranked slightly above the national average. Still, that means that - as in many other states - fewer than half of Maryland students are passing the national tests. The National Assessment of Educational Progress tests in reading and math were given to 700,000 students in the fourth and eighth grades in Maryland and across the nation in March.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN REPORTER | September 3, 2007
Four years ago, award-winning math teacher Linda Eberhart began gathering her colleagues in Baltimore schools to talk about what was working in their classrooms and what wasn't. Now a new study shows that city students whose teachers participate in Eberhart's program - called MathWorks - post significantly higher test scores than their peers. Among sixth-graders whose teachers attended monthly Thursday night sessions last academic year, 70 percent passed the state's standardized math test.
NEWS
By Ruma Kumar and Ruma Kumar,Sun Reporter | June 15, 2007
Though there are bright spots, most minority students in Anne Arundel County schools continue to lag behind their white peers on high-stakes state exams, despite new efforts to train teachers and administrators to focus on closing the achievement gap. Overall, the county posted modest gains on the annual Maryland School Assessments, exceeding state averages by 3 to 13 percentage points on the reading and math tests, according to scores released this...
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer | July 25, 1993
Howard County students fared a little better in state functional tests this past school year, but black students still lagged behind in all areas, especially math.All students are required to pass state functional tests in reading, writing, math and citizenship to graduate from high school.Students take the tests for the first time in ninth grade and may take them again until they pass. Except for the citizenship portion, the tests measure basic skills that students should have mastered by the sixth or seventh grade.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1999
The Baltimore school board voted unanimously last night to set new passing standards for children in grades one through eight, saying it hoped the policy would raise expectations and achievement."
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the Sun | March 18, 2007
Justin Homassel, 8, a second-grader at Waterloo Elementary School, seemed perfectly comfortable taking the stage Friday and speaking in front of a school assembly. "Thank you for everyone that's giving in money to support my cause," he said into the microphone. His fellow students cheered. Justin was born with cystic fibrosis, a disease that means, in his words, "there's mucus in my lungs, and it's hard to breathe." His teacher, Meggen Vannostrand, said, "He has to take a special pill every day before he eats."
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,SUN REPORTER | October 20, 2006
Elizabeth Beer thought her high school nemesis was math. She took advanced courses, but it was the only subject in which straight A's eluded her. Her real nemesis, she later concluded, might have been her math teacher, who dished out discouragement. "He didn't think women belonged in math," recalls Beer, a third-year doctoral student in the Johns Hopkins University's applied mathematics and statistics department. The teacher's message - that women are innately math-deficient - didn't keep Beer from succeeding in the subject in the long run, but it could explain her early struggles.
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