Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMath And Science
IN THE NEWS

Math And Science

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 25, 2006
Two promising Baltimore-area partnerships between philanthropy and academia could help ease the perpetual shortage of math and science teachers in Maryland. The approaches that are being tried at two area schools, the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and Towson University, are different but complementary. If successful, they could be expanded and replicated to address a critical need. Schools across the nation are seeking qualified math and science teachers, mostly from the ranks of those who might have majored in some combination of math, science and education as well as those who have relevant professional experience.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2014
A fifth-grade math and science teacher whose principal calls her the "cream of the crop" and whose students say makes them forget they're learning equations and elements was named Baltimore City's 2014 Teacher of the Year. Elizabeth Barletta, in her fourth year at Barclay Elementary/Middle School, was surprised in her classroom Thursday by interim schools CEO Tisha Edwards. She was chosen by a committee for the honor after being nominated and going through a process that included essays, interviews and classroom observations.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2012
A new teacher training program designed to help girls and minorities succeed in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics is focusing on how small actions in the classroom can affect a student's achievement. The Educators' Equity STEM Academy began Monday for professors at the Community College of Baltimore County, and it eventually will be available to high school teachers and community college teachers elsewhere in the state. "We're really focusing on the little messages, the implicit messages that add up over time," said Tara Ebersole, a biology professor and STEM liaison for the community college.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
It was an uncommon partnership for a Maryland school and an aerospace company. In 2012, Boeing agreed to pump hundreds of thousands of dollars into one Harford County high school to improve Advanced Placement achievement in hopes that students - many the children of military and defense contracting families - would pursue science and math courses in college. Aberdeen High School teachers and students were paid $100 for every passing score on an Advanced Placement test.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | September 28, 1992
Mathematicians and scientists from the National Security Agency have begun teaching regularly in Howard County schools this year under an educational partnership.Beginning this school year, about 10 mathematicians and scientists from the NSA's Mathematics Education Partnership Program are each working one hour a week with students in math and science.NSA officials applauded the partnership."The quality of education of the general population is an issue of national security," said NSA math adviser George Alberts.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | November 30, 1998
An article in yesterday's Maryland section about Baltimore's Ingenuity Project for gifted children misidentified a student as Dallas Terry. He actually is Dallas Perry, a sophomore at Polytechnic Institute.The Sun regrets the error.They were the smartest pupils in their fifth-grade classes, the children who were the first to put down their pencils and the first to raise their hands. Sometimes, they were teased by classmates or felt awkward about being a "nerd."Then they entered Ingenuity Project, and their school lives changed.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
It was an uncommon partnership for a Maryland school and an aerospace company. In 2012, Boeing agreed to pump hundreds of thousands of dollars into one Harford County high school to improve Advanced Placement achievement in hopes that students - many the children of military and defense contracting families - would pursue science and math courses in college. Aberdeen High School teachers and students were paid $100 for every passing score on an Advanced Placement test.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | July 4, 2001
EIGHT YEARS ago, the federal government (with an assist from Maryland Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski) began investing heavily in math and science education in the nation's large cities, including Baltimore. Since then, the "Urban Systemic Initiative," an offshoot of the National Science Foundation, has pumped more than $2 billion into the schools of 22 cities. The initiative was said to be an attempt to completely change the way math and science are taught in distressed cities - thus the "systemic" in the obscurant title.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2000
Northrop Grumman engineers design defense systems, precision weapons and aerospace equipment, but this month they are also building bridges with 13-year-olds. Construction is by way of a computer exercise that tests the pupils' math and science skills. The process might set some of the children on an engineering career track, the engineers hope. "We want to take the nerdiness out of the engineering stereotype," said Jim Arnett, an electronics engineer with the company's Baltimore-Washington International Airport division.
NEWS
February 1, 1991
More than 30 years have passed since the Soviet Union launched "Sputnik," the world's first artificial satellite. That 1957 Soviet triumph blew away the comfortable complacency of a U.S. education establishment that had grown accustomed to thinking of itself as second to none. "Sputnik" was an unmistakable warning that no nation could neglect math and science instruction and expect to remain competitive. As a result, U.S. educators were forced into a thorough re-examination of secondary school math and science programs in this country.
NEWS
December 3, 2013
A report this week that American students are lagging behind their top international peers in math, reading and science should give pause to those who argue that the nation's school reform efforts are going too far and too fast. In fact, they suggest just the opposite: The, at best, middling scores of American 15-year-olds not only challenge the notion of American "exceptionalism," they also threaten over time to erode the educational foundations of the world's largest economy and its global political and military influence.
NEWS
January 3, 2013
After the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School, what's needed is more gun control, according to columnist Dan Rodricks ("The massacre this time," Dec. 15). Yet a story in the same edition described a man in China who used a knife to attack some 20 children. The problem is not the weapon, but the troubled young men who wield them. It is a daunting, if not impossible task for psychiatrists, psychologists and others to take the first step in situations where even parents are frustrated and helpless in dealing with a troubled child.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2012
Mary Ann Rankin, a former longtime administrator at the University of Texas at Austin known for creating the innovative UTeach program to produce math and science teachers, was named provost at the University of Maryland, College Park. Rankin, who will start as College Park's No. 2 academic administrator in October, is currently the CEO of the Dallas-based National Math and Science Initiative. Like UTeach, the public-private partnership was designed to produce more graduates and teachers in the science, technology, engineering and math (STEM)
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2012
A new teacher training program designed to help girls and minorities succeed in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics is focusing on how small actions in the classroom can affect a student's achievement. The Educators' Equity STEM Academy began Monday for professors at the Community College of Baltimore County, and it eventually will be available to high school teachers and community college teachers elsewhere in the state. "We're really focusing on the little messages, the implicit messages that add up over time," said Tara Ebersole, a biology professor and STEM liaison for the community college.
NEWS
December 27, 2011
Who says sitting in the back of a packed lecture hall trying to absorb the intricacies of trigonometric functions or the chemistry of organic molecules is the only way to teach aspiring young scientists the tools of their trade? Well, tradition mostly. That's how generations of undergraduate math and science students were trained, and for a long time the system seemed to work. But there was always a downside to the method: Far too many of those budding Einsteins and Edisons never made it past Chemistry 101. Discouraged by the impersonal formality and isolation of a hard sciences education, they dropped out to pursue less abstruse fields of study.
EXPLORE
By Brianna Patterson | December 23, 2011
Rupini Shukla is a natural born altruist, dedicated to helping young people in her community become better students. "It's a feeling of satisfaction; it makes me really happy that I volunteer," said Shukla, a senior at Oakland Mills High School. "I've lost track of how many hours I've done because it's not something you think of when you're really doing it from the heart. " Once a week, the 17-year-old can be found at the Howard County Library's East Columbia branch tutoring middle school students in math and science through the Teen Time after-school program.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | February 22, 2001
Felicity Ross has the seventh-graders in her second-period class talking about relationships, but not the kind you might think. She has just asked them to draw two triangles, and they're trying to figure out how the angles and sides are related. No one can figure it out at first, but Ross keeps prodding them until one boy catches on. "The smallest angle is opposite the smallest side!" says Leonardo Apolonio, 12. This is a typical morning in Ross' classroom at Hampden's Robert Poole Middle School, but Ross is not typical.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2011
In addition to swimming with Michael Phelps ' instructors and battling with handmade robots, Baltimore summer school students will be building soapbox cars to help keep their minds revving until the next school year. In a program that began Tuesday, 2,000 middle school students will participate in what the district has themed a "Grand Prix" of summer learning in anticipation of the world-class auto racing event coming to the city in early September. It's the newest programming effort by the school system to join the nationwide campaign to combat summer learning loss and continue the district's emphasis on a summer science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM)
NEWS
March 14, 2011
Thank you for The Sun's front-page article on the challenges of teaching science, technology, math and engineering in Maryland ("Deficient in science: State known for research doesn't do very well at science education," March 10). We must invest in STEM in the earlier grades; children between the ages of 6 and 12 have a high interest in math and science, but as they get older that drops off. Contrary to common belief, test performance is not a good indicator of who will pursue STEM career, but interest in science careers among 8 t h -graders is. Thus, we must cultivate interest in science in the pre-teen years and continue to cultivate that interest throughout high school.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.