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NEWS
January 23, 2012
I'm part of the new "get lost" generation of folks over 65 that many are complaining will financially destroy our fragile economy ("Aging out of health care?" Jan. 19). I know that I'm old and that math has never been my strength, but writer Lisa Pevtzow used the figure $49 billion a year to describe the cost of Medicare coverage for the 45 million old folks of my generation. Forty-nine billion dollars divided by 45 million people equals a little more than $1,080 per person.
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NEWS
By Michael Hensley | October 13, 2014
I've taught math at Oakland Mills High School in Howard County for seven years. In that time, I've read hundreds of articles about the problems in American math education. But I've yet to see a mention of the single biggest crisis I face in my classroom. Howard County has a policy of placing every ninth grade student into at least Algebra I - even if the student is currently doing math at a fourth grade level. As a direct result of this policy, students enter my classroom lacking essential prerequisite knowledge.
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NEWS
August 29, 2014
Regarding your Reuters report on Family Dollar stores, a little fact-checking and a more skeptical attitude surely could have produced a more convincing article ("Dollar stores count on poverty," Aug. 29). The report states that "Dollar stores offer their customers low prices by not necessarily the best value. "For example, Huggies diapers were selling this month in a Family Dollar store for 27 cents a diaper in an 80-diaper pack. "But at Wal-Mart, shoppers could pay 17 cents a diaper if they bought the larger 120-diaper pack.
NEWS
October 1, 2014
Thank you for having the courage to question the feminist default by running the commentary which questions the math for rape stats not adding up ( "Do the math: rape stats don't add up," Sept. 26). This is the sort of courage that has been sorely lacking in the media over the last 50 years and has led us into such a one-sided Mobius strip mentality when it comes to the issues of men and women. Please do keep questioning. This is a vital role for the media to play and it has been missing in action for too many years.
NEWS
June 3, 2012
I read with great interest The Sun's coverage of Maryland obtaining a waiver from the No Child Left Behind federal law ("Leaving NCLB behind," May 31). In fact, it seems 36 states are going this route. This is a big reprieve to Maryland after spending millions of tax dollars on administrative programs with minimal results, not to mention a huge increase in administrative personnel to implement these new programs. This law is flawed, as are the people who instituted it. If you read the name No Child Left Behind it says that this program is not going to allow one child to fail.
NEWS
February 25, 2013
Marta Mossburg once again gets it wrong on public employee pensions, incorrectly claiming the state pension system suffered a poor rate of return ("On state pensions, 'Everyone else is doing it' is no excuse," Feb. 13). She does this by cherry picking a few numbers and willfully ignoring the most important facts. The fact of the matter is our state pension system earned nearly 8 percent over the past 25 years, earning 20 percent in 2011 and 14 percent in 2010. Why is it important to look at long term performance vs. year-to-year?
NEWS
By Childs Walker | childs.walker@baltsun.com | December 5, 2009
Students applying to the state university system will have to have four math courses and will be required to take math their last year in high school under new admissions requirements passed Friday by regents. The requirements, which will take effect for those starting ninth grade in 2011, passed unanimously after a spirited debate in which several regents and university presidents questioned whether the standards would be the best fit for all students. Skeptics expressed particular concern about students who reach a high level of math early in high school and want to try other subjects as seniors.
NEWS
August 19, 2011
Regarding your editorial "Expanding access to care" (Aug. 16), I will be anxiously watching for your future editorials giving us some of the details of how 350,000 Maryland residents will be added to the roles of the medically insured, at apparently little or no cost to them, while the state realizes cost savings of $850 million. A. J. Colyer, Bel Air
NEWS
February 27, 2012
We have more roads and more cars since the gas tax was last raised 20 years ago when cars were getting 15 to 20 miles per gallon but now are getting 30 to 40. Thus, more cars, more roads, and only half the tax coming in. And what revenue is coming in is worth less than what the same 23 cents was worth 20 years ago because of inflation. Although it's popular to be against taxes, an educated public understands that we need government to provide for the common good. And that includes good roads.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Vincent J. Salkoski, who taught mathematics in Baltimore public schools and was a World War II veteran, died Sept. 3 of heart disease at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 88. Vincent Joseph Salkoski was born in Baltimore and raised in Curtis Bay, where he was a member of the Curtis Bay Athletic Club. After graduating from Southern High School in 1944, he enlisted in the Marine Corps and served as a rifleman and mortarman. He participated in the occupation of China. After being discharged in 1946, he took courses at City College and the Johns Hopkins University to receive his teaching certification.
NEWS
By Susan Patton and Jonathan David Farley | September 26, 2014
You've heard the statistics: one in four women will be raped in college Or is it " sexually assaulted or almost sexually assaulted"? Or is it "nearly one in five"? Or "one in six"? According to the White House, a rape epidemic is sweeping college campuses , with the #YesAllWomen campaign calling all men weapons of mass destruction. Let's look at some facts. According to the FBI "[t]he rate of forcible rapes in 2012 was estimated at 52.9 per 100,000 female inhabitants.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Vincent J. Salkoski, who taught mathematics in Baltimore public schools and was a World War II veteran, died Sept. 3 of heart disease at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 88. Vincent Joseph Salkoski was born in Baltimore and raised in Curtis Bay, where he was a member of the Curtis Bay Athletic Club. After graduating from Southern High School in 1944, he enlisted in the Marine Corps and served as a rifleman and mortarman. He participated in the occupation of China. After being discharged in 1946, he took courses at City College and the Johns Hopkins University to receive his teaching certification.
NEWS
August 29, 2014
Regarding your Reuters report on Family Dollar stores, a little fact-checking and a more skeptical attitude surely could have produced a more convincing article ("Dollar stores count on poverty," Aug. 29). The report states that "Dollar stores offer their customers low prices by not necessarily the best value. "For example, Huggies diapers were selling this month in a Family Dollar store for 27 cents a diaper in an 80-diaper pack. "But at Wal-Mart, shoppers could pay 17 cents a diaper if they bought the larger 120-diaper pack.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
Three years ago, no student at Milford Mill Academy passed the Advanced Placement calculus exam, which made it clear that unprepared students were being pushed into the high-level class. In an attempt to change that, a dozen high school students who have signed up for AP calculus at the Baltimore County school are honing their math skills at a boot camp this week and next. And they'll get extra help on Saturdays during the school year. Tekiah Hanks, a 16-year-old who might have been picking fruit or sleeping late on Thursday morning, said she has no regrets about the summer hours she has committed to solving math problems.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
For many students who took the Maryland School Assessments this year, parts of the math sections just didn't add up. Amid the rollout of new curriculums aligned with the more rigorous Common Core standards, pass rates on the Maryland School Assessments plunged, with this year marking the steepest drops in the test's history because of a dive in math scores. There was a good chance students in grades three through eight might not have recognized at least three concepts in which they were being asked to demonstrate mastery.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
The Baltimore area has an outsized share of job openings in fields that make heavy use of science, technology, engineering or math skills, occupations that pay more and are harder for employers to fill, according to a new analysis. The Brookings Institution study, to be released today, found that the Baltimore region had the eighth-highest percentage of job openings in "STEM" fields among large metro areas - on par with high-tech Seattle and Boston. In much of the country, Brookings said, STEM jobs remain posted on company websites for longer than other listings, suggesting that it takes more time to get enough qualified applicants.
NEWS
November 15, 2012
Parents shouldn't try to shield their kids from the hard work of getting a good education by protesting the tediousness of math. Math is not just a bunch of abstract equations, it is the language we use to describe how things work. We are surrounded by systems that have inputs and outputs. Math is the only tool we have to understand them and describe how they work. Without math, kids would be thrown into a world with no skills to even appreciate, much less to understand, the complexities of what is going on around them.
NEWS
By T'Jae Gibson | May 7, 2014
She was part of the first graduating class of the Science and Math Academy at Aberdeen High School. When it opened, some thought it was hard to get students to compete for admission. Now, it's clear the challenge is getting past the waiting list. For Christine Harvey, 23, her enrollment there led her to an experience her senior year of high school that helped shape her future. She accepted an internship at the Army Research Laboratory working with David Webb, a mathematical statistician in the weapon and materials research area.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
I. William Lustbader, a retired Polytechnic Institute mathematics teacher, died of congestive heart failure April 15 at his Delray Beach, Fla., home. The former Northwest Baltimore resident was 98. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of Hosiah Lustbader, who owned a hardware and home furnishings store later razed for the state office complex. He was born at home above the store. His mother, Mollie Lustbader, was a homemaker. His parents were from Eastern Europe. He was a 1932 graduate of City College, where he ran track.
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