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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 12, 2007
CINCINNATI -- The Ohio Civil Rights Commission is pushing for a broad expansion of benefits for pregnant workers. If its proposals are adopted, Ohio would join 18 states that require employers to offer maternity leaves that exceed those mandated by the federal Family and Medical Leave Act. That law offers workers at businesses with 50 or more employees 12 weeks of unpaid leave. Expectant mothers must have worked for a business for a year, or 1,250 hours, to be eligible. The Ohio commission has proposed that businesses with four or more employees offer 12 weeks of unpaid maternity leave to pregnant employees, regardless of how long they have worked.
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BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2013
A mortgage lender based in Utah has agreed to pay a Baltimore woman $13,000 for denying her a loan because she was pregnant and on maternity leave, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development announced Tuesday. Primary Residential Mortgage Inc., based in Salt Lake City, also agreed to adopt a parental leave policy, to ensure its employees are complying with family status provisions of the Fair Housing Act, which prevents lending discrimination based on other applicant traits including sex, race and religion.
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NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Sun Staff Writer | July 21, 1995
A Columbia health-care firm is appealing a Howard County Human Rights Commission order that it pay $26,500 to a woman the company fired after she followed her doctor's instructions to extend her maternity leave.In a decision signed last month, the commission ordered HealthCare Strategies Inc., a managed-care provider, to provide back pay to medical transcriptionist Judith Carter of Randallstown. The panel also told the company to change its maternity leave policy.Janice K. Albert, president and chief executive officer of the company, said the company is appealing the decision, mainly to defend the company's reputation in the health-care field.
NEWS
By Marie-Claude Lavoie | February 21, 2013
This month marks the 20th anniversary of the U.S. Family and Medical Leave Act. The 1993 act is a federal law requiring employers to provide employees 12 weeks of unpaid leave for qualified medical and family reasons, including pregnancy. On this anniversary, we should reflect on how the U.S. is unacceptably lagging behind on parental leave and on what we should do to overcome this gap. Researchers at McGill University's Institute for Health and Social Policy compared policies across the globe and found that among the 173 countries studied, five did not offer any paid parental leave.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 3, 1997
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- What has been perhaps the world's most unfair workplace is being reformed to make it a model of modern employment standards.Nelson Mandela's post-apartheid government proposes a new deal for this nation's 10 million workers with a shorter workweek, more generous overtime, a week's extra vacation and longer maternity, sick and family leave."It demands of everybody the need to change step from an exploitative atmosphere to one which promotes social justice," said Labor Minister Tito Mboweni.
BUSINESS
By Shirley Leung and Shirley Leung,SUN STAFF | December 20, 1995
Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and the U.S. Department of Labor kicked off a project yesterday that honors local employers for taking steps to help working women.A dozen companies and institutions -- ranging from a recycling firm to a hotel -- now are part of the Labor Department's "Working Women Count Honor Roll." The companies pledged to aid working women by offering flexible working schedules, extended maternity leave, improved health benefits or job training and advancement."I would like to formally challenge Baltimore companies to follow the lead of these companies," said Mayor Schmoke before about 50 working women at City Hall.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2005
A high-ranking state official said yesterday that Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley's sister-in-law was never targeted for dismissal, despite e-mails from an ousted aide of Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. questioning her position. In an e-mail last summer, former Ehrlich aide Joseph F. Steffen Jr. asked a gubernatorial appointments official, Diane Baker, whether Melinda O'Malley - then on maternity leave - could be moved from her job as an attorney for the Maryland Insurance Administration. Ehrlich fired Steffen in February after the aide admitted spreading rumors about Martin O'Malley's personal life.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2013
A mortgage lender based in Utah has agreed to pay a Baltimore woman $13,000 for denying her a loan because she was pregnant and on maternity leave, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development announced Tuesday. Primary Residential Mortgage Inc., based in Salt Lake City, also agreed to adopt a parental leave policy, to ensure its employees are complying with family status provisions of the Fair Housing Act, which prevents lending discrimination based on other applicant traits including sex, race and religion.
BUSINESS
By Carol Kleiman and Carol Kleiman,Chicago Tribune | October 7, 1991
CHICAGO -- When an account executive returned to work at a suburban advertising agency after the birth of her child, she was told the temporary worker hired to do her job at half her salary was going to be kept on -- and she was out of a job."They promised I'd have my job when I came back from maternity leave," she said. "Now I'm unemployed, and it's not fair."A bank loan officer left to have her baby last May. In June, the bank went through a major downsizing -- and she was out. Her accounts were given to a man who was inexperienced in loans and whose workload was doubled.
BUSINESS
By Alyssa Gabbay and Alyssa Gabbay,Special to The Sun | September 9, 1991
Thanks to modern science, conception and childbirth are no longer mysteries for most people. But, for many pregnant women, one related issue remains shrouded in darkness: the terms of their maternity leaves.Whether out of a sense of complacency or a distaste for bureaucracy, many smaller companies lack formal maternity leave policies. Instead, they grant leave on an ad hoc basis.That's perfectly legal. But companies that do so may be playing with fire, many attorneys say."The employer who treats [maternity leaves]
FEATURES
By Sarah Kickler Kelber and The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2012
Now that I'm back in the office full time after a few months of maternity leave, I've got to reorient my thinking and remember how to act when I'm around adults more often. I also need to return to my workplace habit of making to-do lists to stay organized. To that end, here's the Top 8 things I need to stop doing now that I'm back in the office: 1. Going to the bathroom with the door open so I can hear whether anyone is crying or up to any mischief. (Or both.) 2. Corollary: Announcing that I'm going "potty" now. 3. Going "SHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!"
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2011
I am not going to spoil this video from Thursday's night's "Daily Show" by giving you my views on it before you have seen it. It's vintage Jon Stewart with the comedian in this case ridiculing the Fox News host for what he presents as her flip-flop views of maternity leave before and after she was a beneficiary of it. Lots of talk of entitlements and suggestions of hypocrisy. What do you think? I'll join the discussion later. The Daily Show - Lactate Intolerance Get More: Daily Show Full Episodes , Political Humor & Satire Blog , The Daily Show on Facebook
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 12, 2007
CINCINNATI -- The Ohio Civil Rights Commission is pushing for a broad expansion of benefits for pregnant workers. If its proposals are adopted, Ohio would join 18 states that require employers to offer maternity leaves that exceed those mandated by the federal Family and Medical Leave Act. That law offers workers at businesses with 50 or more employees 12 weeks of unpaid leave. Expectant mothers must have worked for a business for a year, or 1,250 hours, to be eligible. The Ohio commission has proposed that businesses with four or more employees offer 12 weeks of unpaid maternity leave to pregnant employees, regardless of how long they have worked.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2005
A high-ranking state official said yesterday that Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley's sister-in-law was never targeted for dismissal, despite e-mails from an ousted aide of Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. questioning her position. In an e-mail last summer, former Ehrlich aide Joseph F. Steffen Jr. asked a gubernatorial appointments official, Diane Baker, whether Melinda O'Malley - then on maternity leave - could be moved from her job as an attorney for the Maryland Insurance Administration. Ehrlich fired Steffen in February after the aide admitted spreading rumors about Martin O'Malley's personal life.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2004
A police officer who didn't realize how seriously a victim was injured and a prosecutor's maternity leave were among the factors that enabled an Ellicott City woman to avoid a vehicular homicide charge after killing a motorcyclist in a drunken-driving accident, Howard's top prosecutor said. Susan Elizabeth Williams, 35, could be sentenced to up to a year in jail after her conviction Monday of driving under the influence, the most serious charge that remained after a Howard County Circuit Court judge dismissed motor-vehicle homicide charges related to the death Sept.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | May 6, 2004
BOSTON - Can it be a coincidence that Margaret D. Tutwiler quit as the top PR agent for America the same week photos of Iraqi prisoner abuse were beamed across the world? In one year, the president's "mission accomplished" had become her mission impossible. The respected veteran of four administrations was the third to give up the State Department post that is charged with improving America's image. It's going to be easier to put the bloom back on the rose of her next client, the New York Stock Exchange.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2004
A police officer who didn't realize how seriously a victim was injured and a prosecutor's maternity leave were among the factors that enabled an Ellicott City woman to avoid a vehicular homicide charge after killing a motorcyclist in a drunken-driving accident, Howard's top prosecutor said. Susan Elizabeth Williams, 35, could be sentenced to up to a year in jail after her conviction Monday of driving under the influence, the most serious charge that remained after a Howard County Circuit Court judge dismissed motor-vehicle homicide charges related to the death Sept.
NEWS
By Marie-Claude Lavoie | February 21, 2013
This month marks the 20th anniversary of the U.S. Family and Medical Leave Act. The 1993 act is a federal law requiring employers to provide employees 12 weeks of unpaid leave for qualified medical and family reasons, including pregnancy. On this anniversary, we should reflect on how the U.S. is unacceptably lagging behind on parental leave and on what we should do to overcome this gap. Researchers at McGill University's Institute for Health and Social Policy compared policies across the globe and found that among the 173 countries studied, five did not offer any paid parental leave.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2004
A police officer who didn't realize how seriously a victim was injured and a prosecutor's maternity leave were among the factors that enabled an Ellicott City woman to avoid a vehicular homicide charge after killing a motorcyclist in a drunken-driving accident, Howard's top prosecutor says. Susan Elizabeth Williams, 35, faces up to a year in jail after her conviction Monday of driving under the influence, the most serious charge that remained after a Howard County circuit judge dismissed motor-vehicle homicide charges related to the death Sept.
NEWS
By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | May 29, 2003
All Carrie Norry, a seventh-grade math teacher at McDonogh School, wanted to do was teach her pupils what 1 million looked like. That's how a pile of Lincoln-head pennies wound up a foot deep in an 8-foot-by-8-foot plywood box in the foyer of McDonogh's dining hall yesterday. "I thought it would be bigger," said seventh-grader Nick Karwacki, 13, of Finksburg, as he ran his fingers through the pile. His classmate and friend, Mitchell Cohen, also 13, of Owings Mills, said he hadn't known what to expect.
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