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By Kristine Henry
The Baltimore Sun
| July 18, 2013
Dr. Jeffrey Spencer The following commentary by Dr. Jeffrey Spencer, a maternal-fetal medicine specialist at Anne Arundel Medical Center in Annapolis, was broadcast this morning on WYPR and was provided to Maryland Family by the medical center. For expectant mothers nearing their due date, those last few weeks of pregnancy are filled with anticipation, excitement, discomfort, and stress. With thoughts about family visiting, work issues, or even fear of a large baby, many mothers today try to have their babies early.
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By Kristine Henry
The Baltimore Sun
| July 18, 2013
Dr. Jeffrey Spencer The following commentary by Dr. Jeffrey Spencer, a maternal-fetal medicine specialist at Anne Arundel Medical Center in Annapolis, was broadcast this morning on WYPR and was provided to Maryland Family by the medical center. For expectant mothers nearing their due date, those last few weeks of pregnancy are filled with anticipation, excitement, discomfort, and stress. With thoughts about family visiting, work issues, or even fear of a large baby, many mothers today try to have their babies early.
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Andrea K. Walker | February 13, 2012
Yale medical researchers have found that C-sections may be causing breathing problems in preemies who are small for their age. The researcher reviewed eight years of birth certificates and found that babies delivered by a C-section before 34 weeks of pregnancy who were small for gestational age had higher odds of developing respiratory distress syndrome than babies born vaginally. The study was recently presented at the 32nd Annual Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM)
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | February 13, 2012
Yale medical researchers have found that C-sections may be causing breathing problems in preemies who are small for their age. The researcher reviewed eight years of birth certificates and found that babies delivered by a C-section before 34 weeks of pregnancy who were small for gestational age had higher odds of developing respiratory distress syndrome than babies born vaginally. The study was recently presented at the 32nd Annual Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM)
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By Maryalice Yakutchik and Maryalice Yakutchik,Contributing Writer | May 23, 1993
A bevy of bellies assembles daily in the Village of Cross Keys to await his scrutiny. Some are puffy, others downright mountainous. All are gobbed with goo.Dr. Roger Sanders looks through the taut tummy skin at males flailing tiny arms, females floating contentedly, twins wrestling. Transducer in hand, he can perceive a being the size of a pinhead, just 2 1/2 weeks after conception. By the time it triples in size to 3 millimeters in length, Dr. Sanders can detect the motion of a heart beating, if not see the muscle itself.
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November 1, 2007
Dr. Mauro V. Leo has joined Franklin Square Hospital Center as director of the Maternal-Fetal Medicine Center, which provides advanced evaluation and management of high-risk pregnancies. Leo is certified by the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology in obstetrics and gynecology and maternal-fetal medicine. Dr. David N. Maine has joined Mercy Medical Center as director of the new Center for Interventional Pain Medicine. The center will treat a variety of conditions, including spinal stenosis, osteoarthritis and peripheral neuropathy.
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By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | May 31, 1996
Two foundations representing the Blaustein, Rosenberg and Thalheimer families have given Sinai Hospital grants totaling $3 million to strengthen women's health services, completing the first half of the hospital's $60 million 2nd Century Campaign.Dr. Wayne A. Cohen, Sinai's new chief of obstetrics and gynecology, said yesterday the "important" gifts support two initiatives that have begun and another to start serving women:The Institute for Special Pelvic Surgery, a mid-Atlantic center that supports the medical and social needs of women requiring highly sophisticated gynecological surgery.
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By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | November 14, 1991
The health care of 100,000 poor women in Maryland will be jeopardized if President Bush delivers on a promise to veto legislation overturning "gag rule" restrictions on family planning clinics supported by federal funds, Baltimore medical experts said today.The veto, expected this week, "amounts very simply to censorship within the doctor's office," according to Dr. David A. Nagey, director of the division of maternal-fetal medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine.If allowed to go into effect, the gag regulations would make it illegal for health professionals in public and private clinics receiving federal funds to provide any information about terminating a pregnancy.
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By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | November 15, 1991
Labeling as "bad medicine" a gag rule that would slash the federal funding of health clinics that even mention abortion as a patient option, Maryland medical experts have called on the state's congressional delegation to once again help squash it.Legislation to block the gag regulations was passed by a wide margin last week but President Bush is expected to veto the bill. The gag rule was imposed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services."We're sending a strong message to the . . . delegation to once again work to override the president's promised veto," Dr. David A. Nagey, director of maternal-fetal medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, said yesterday.
NEWS
August 9, 1999
Two marinas get award for pollution preventionHerrington Harbor-South in Friendship and Port Annapolis Marina in Annapolis were among six marinas named a "Clean Marina" by boating industry executives and members of the environmental community.These marinas have met the pollution prevention standards established by Maryland's Clean Marina Committee and the Department of Natural Resources as part of the agency's Clean Marina Initiative.Each of the marinas has implemented pollution controls in such areas as petroleum storage and transfer; sewage disposal; solid, liquid and hazardous wastes; and storm water runoff as part of their being named a certified Clean Marina.
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By Maryalice Yakutchik and Maryalice Yakutchik,Contributing Writer | May 23, 1993
A bevy of bellies assembles daily in the Village of Cross Keys to await his scrutiny. Some are puffy, others downright mountainous. All are gobbed with goo.Dr. Roger Sanders looks through the taut tummy skin at males flailing tiny arms, females floating contentedly, twins wrestling. Transducer in hand, he can perceive a being the size of a pinhead, just 2 1/2 weeks after conception. By the time it triples in size to 3 millimeters in length, Dr. Sanders can detect the motion of a heart beating, if not see the muscle itself.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Diana K. Sugg and Frederick N. Rasmussen and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2002
Dr. David A. Nagey, director of the perinatal outreach division at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and an internationally known expert on high-risk pregnancies, died of a heart attack Sunday after collapsing during a 5K fund-raising race at Indian Creek School in Crownsville. He was 51. A resident of Sherwood Forest near Annapolis, Dr. Nagey was participating in an annual event that raises money for the independent school where his wife is development director. Personable and committed, Dr. Nagey was revered as a teacher and physician by a generation of obstetricians.
FEATURES
By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Medical Tribune News Service | June 7, 1994
Women today are deluged with information about what is and is not good to do during pregnancy -- or while they are trying to get pregnant. They are careful to eat proper nutrients. They give up smoking. They exercise and cut out alcohol.For many women, a good cup of coffee in the morning is probably the only treat they do allow themselves.But new studies have claimed that pregnant women who consume as little as 48 milligrams of caffeine a day may have a greater risk of miscarriage than those who consume no caffeine.
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