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By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
Sean O'Harra's furniture might be newly constructed, but there's nothing "new" about it. Walking through his workshop, a cavernous warehouse space on Reisterstown Road, O'Harra points to an enormous piece of wood, a cross-section of a maple tree trunk. "That is a tabletop," he explains. "It came out of a yard in Mount Washington and migrated to me. " The wood is rich brown, with prominent grain and an intricate, almost lacy, edge. It made its way to O'Harra via friends and friends of friends who knew he would appreciate it. He'll pair the wood with a metal base, balancing the maple's organic beauty with the cool modernity of metal.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2014
In the spring of 1981, when Marion Rodgers was a senior at Goucher College, she nearly fell on top of a box of old papers that would change her life. Rodgers was preparing an article for the student newspaper paper on a former author and Goucher professor named Sara Haardt - who later married the iconoclastic journalist H.L. Mencken. "I was putting away one of her scrapbooks in the vault of the library's rare book room when I literally stumbled over a box that was lying on the floor next to a shelf," said Rodgers, now a resident of Washington, D.C. "Taped on the top of the box was a message that basically said, 'Do not open until 1981.
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NEWS
By Jamal E. Watson and Jamal E. Watson,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1998
Confirming for the first time a possible source of the methane gas that has kept four families out of their homes in Elkridge, the developer said materials such as tree stumps had been buried at the site years before.John Liparini, president of the Brantley Group, said that most of the decomposing organic material was eliminated two years ago from the Calvert Ridge subdivision before houses were built. But he said that workers stopped digging at 14 feet and more might be buried.Liparini's disclosure comes five weeks after potentially explosive levels of methane in basements forced out three families in Calvert Ridge indefinitely, and briefly forced a fourth family out of its home in a neighboring subdivision, Marshalee Woods.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
The Maryland Republican Party admitted Wednesday that it used a trademarked logo of the Baltimore Ravens to raise funds without seeking the team's permission. The party's executive director said it had been an error on his part. The unauthorized use of the purple-and-black logo and Ravens shield came as the party publicized a fundraiser at a private home in Edgewater. In emails, on Facebook and on the party Web page, the state GOP used the logo to invite people to "an afternoon of Ravens football and Republican Party politics" during Sunday's game against the Cleveland Browns.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 12, 2002
WASHINGTON - Independent auditors at several federal agencies have issued reports in recent weeks criticizing the agencies for moving too slowly to confront the risks of terrorist attacks against their facilities and the public. The security audits, prepared by the inspectors general, say that even after the terror attacks of Sept. 11, some government departments did not act effectively to control hazardous materials, secure buildings and aircraft, clamp down on unlawful immigrants, protect vital computers and communication links, or take other high-priority measures.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | October 20, 1996
We're planning to build a contemporary home that is to include a number of different levels separated from one another by only two or three steps. Should all the flooring be made of the same material? If not, can you suggest a few options?For safety reasons alone, each level should be visually denoted by a change in the color of its flooring, if not necessarily in the material itself. Since I haven't seen your actual plan, I can offer only general advice about when to introduce different materials and what type they should be.In contemporary homes, it's usually wise to keep the transitions to a minimum; most such settings aim for a bold simplicity that will be shattered if too many materials are in play at the same time.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2013
Dennis J. Szymaszek, a retired materials and logistics director who was a classic sports car enthusiast, died Friday of cancer at University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center. He was 71. The son of an Armco steelworker and a homemaker, Dennis Joseph Szymaszek was born in Baltimore and spent his early years on Bank Street before moving with his family to Dundalk. After graduating in 1959 from Dundalk High School, he began a 43-year career at PEMCO Corp., where he rose to become director of materials and logistics for North American operations.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | August 30, 2009
Alongside a winding country road in Upperco in northern Baltimore County is a humble log cabin that partially burned last year. County officials say it is unsafe and must come down. But the logs and stone foundation put there some 200 years ago, as well as the metal roof and oak boards installed later as part of an addition, will not go to the landfill. They will get a new life about three miles down the road in a new house. Three men have been working for days with crowbars and hammers and sweat to disassemble the building.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2011
A Pakistani man living in Maryland has been charged with scheming to smuggle materials and equipment used in nuclear processing to agencies in his home country, federal officials announced Wednesday. Nadeem Akhtar, 45, of Silver Spring is accused in a grand jury indictment of buying the materials from U.S. companies and shipping them to blacklisted Pakistani agencies by lying to shipping companies about what the packages contained between 2005 and 2010. Some of the goods Akhtar and an unnamed co-defendant arranged to ship to sites in Pakistan, prosecutors said, include radiation-detection equipment, resins used to purify coolant water in nuclear power plants, calibration devices and selector switches, which fall under Department of Commerce rules that closely regulate the export of "dual-use items," or materials that potentially have both commercial and nuclear purposes.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2010
W.R. Grace & Co. announced Monday the acquisition of a Chinese manufacturer of waterproofing products, the latest in the Columbia chemical company's efforts to expand its footprint in the Asia-Pacific region. Financial terms of the deal with Wuhan Meilixin New Building Materials Co. Ltd. were not disclosed. Meilixin produces customized waterproofing membranes, materials and compounds in Wuhan, Hubei Province, in Central China. The Chinese manufacturer has 50 workers. Andrew Bonham, president of Grace Construction Products, said in a statement that the acquisition continued the company's investments in international markets.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Old photographs, newspapers and other miscellaneous "gay pride ephemera" from the last half-century of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender history in Baltimore will be added on Tuesday to one of the nation's most esteemed museum collections. Officials at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History will accept the archival materials from the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Baltimore (GLCCB), and add them to its growing collection of items documenting LGBT history.
NEWS
May 12, 2014
The Special Education Citizen Advisory Committee, SECAC, the parent-led organization that bridges the communication between the Harford County Public Schools' Department of Special Education and the Board of Education with parents and community members, donated a collection of books on autism and other child special needs to Harford County Public Library. "Enhancing partnerships with community organizations is part of SECAC's mission and working with the public library system is a perfect fit," Dawn Markovic, SECAC representative, said.
NEWS
By Brandi Bottalico, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2014
Baltimore City's Household Hazardous Waste collection events begin April 4 and will continue every month on the first Friday and immediately following Saturday through October, Public Works Director Rudolph S. Chow announced Monday. City residents can dispose of hazardous household materials, such as pesticides, herbicides, car and household batteries, drain cleaners, oil-based paint and gasoline, according to a department of public works press release. Asbestos, ammunition, fire extinguishers, industrial and medical wastes and radioactive materials will not be accepted.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
No bells and whistles went off today, but the Walters Arts Museum just won the distinction of providing the 10,000th entry in the World Digital Library , a Library of Congress project launched in 2009 that provides free Internet access to manuscripts, maps, books, works of art, photographs, films, recordings and more from every continent. The total number of images provided by those 10,000 entries is nearly 500,000. The Walters manuscripts that helped the digital library reach 10,000 entries include the Corvey Gospel Fragment from 10th-century Germany; the "Imperial" Menologion, a Greek church calendar from the 11th century; and the Ethiopian Gospel from the 16th century.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2014
Baltimore County police say a man who falsely claimed to be an employee at a Middle River company charged more than $11,600 worth of copper piping to the company's account from a supply store on Feb. 6. Police said that at around 11:30 a.m., the man received copper from a supply house on Hollins Ferry Road after he had the purchase credited to the company account of Kinetix, a firm in Middle River. Police said that when a company official at Kinetix was notified of the transaction, it was determined that the purchase had not been authorized.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2014
A tool that contains a small amount of radioactive material, used to measure concentrations of lead in paint, was stolen in Baltimore Monday afternoon, the Maryland Department of the Environment said in an alert. The department said the tool, a Dynasil RMD LPA-1 analyzer, stolen after a property inspection in the 2600 block of E. Monument St., poses "no imminent public health risk. " The radioactive material inside the three-pound device is sealed and housed in a tungsten shield, with locks to prevent its shutter from being opened, the department said.
NEWS
May 15, 2005
THE QUESTION: HOW MANY MATERIALS DO HOWARD COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARIES HAVE IN THEIR COLLECTIONS? A total of 881,711, according to the library's 2004 fiscal year report. That includes books, magazines, newspapers, pamphlets, compact discs, digital video discs and books on tape. The library system had 2,119,436 visits last year and circulated 4,675,402 materials. All six library branches also offer wireless Internet access. Send a question of general interest to: howard.question@baltsun.com
NEWS
July 31, 1991
The North County branch library, at 1010 Eastway acrossfrom Harundale Mall in Glen Burnie, will be closed Aug. 11 through Sept. 2 forthe installation of new carpeting. The branch will reopen at 9 a.m. on Sept. 3.No library materials will be due back to the branch while it is closed. However, North County patrons can return borrowed items through the book-drop, which is at the entrance facing Eastway and Ritchie Highway. Borrowers also may return materials to other branches.It's library policy that materials can be returned to any branch in thecounty public library system, regardless of where they were borrowed.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2014
The Museum of Industry announced Monday it had received a surprise donation from Unilever of roughly two dozen boxes of photographs, documents, and advertising materials related to Noxzema, the widely-used skin cream first sold in the early 1900s from a North Avenue pharmacy in Baltimore. Baltimore pharmacist George Bunting, who named his company the Noxell Corp., later expanded into other areas, including CoverGirl cosmetics. Noxell had about 1,400 Hunt Valley employees in 1989, when Procter & Gamble bought the business for $1.3 billion.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2014
Officials in Maryland don't know how feasible it is to turn dredged muck from the bottom of Baltimore's shipping channels into a commercially viable construction material — but they are looking to find out. The Maryland Department of Transportation and the Maryland Port Administration recently requested information from a variety of private companies on best practices in turning the sludgy dredged material at its Cox Creek Dredged Material Containment...
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