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By Tricia Bishop | tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | March 18, 2010
A Baltimore police officer spent Monday night in a Central Booking cell after a Circuit Court judge issued a "material witness" warrant against the woman - at the request of the city state's attorney's office - when she didn't appear for a gun trial that afternoon. "Without her testimony, we would not have been able to go forward," said Baltimore state's attorney's spokeswoman Margaret T. Burns. The Southwestern District patrol officer, Victoria Reynolds, was on call Monday for a case against Kinte Johnson, 35, who was charged with being a felon illegally in possession of a handgun.
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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | March 18, 2010
A Baltimore police officer spent Monday night in a Central Booking cell after a Circuit Court judge issued a "material witness" warrant against the woman - at the request of the city state's attorney's office - when she didn't appear for a gun trial that afternoon. "Without her testimony, we would not have been able to go forward," said Baltimore state's attorney's spokeswoman Margaret T. Burns. The Southwestern District patrol officer, Victoria Reynolds, was on call Monday for a case against Kinte Johnson, 35, who was charged with being a felon illegally in possession of a handgun.
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NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2004
Ismail Selim Elbarasse is scheduled to go before a federal judge in Baltimore tomorrow and argue why he should not be imprisoned as a "material witness" in a Chicago racketeering case involving members of the militant group Hamas. He has not been charged with a crime, and despite assertions by federal investigators that he might have been surveying the Bay Bridge for a possible terrorist attack, his lawyers say they know of no investigation into his activities in Maryland. But federal prosecutors have said that it's necessary to detain Elbarasse - he is confined to a prison cell 23 hours a day - and they are expected to ask U.S. Magistrate Judge Paul W. Grimm to keep him in custody.
NEWS
By Josh Meyer and Josh Meyer,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 12, 2007
WASHINGTON -- In a setback for the Bush administration, a federal appeals court ruled yesterday that a suspected al-Qaida operative arrested in the United States and detained in military custody for four years cannot be held as an enemy combatant. The 2-1 ruling by the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Va., ordered Ali Saleh Kahlah al-Marri released from a South Carolina military brig's isolation cell, where he has been since President Bush declared him an enemy combatant in June 2003.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes, Lynn Anderson and Richard Irwin and Stephanie Hanes, Lynn Anderson and Richard Irwin,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2004
A man described in a federal indictment as a "high-ranking" Hamas operative was arrested in Maryland on Friday videotaping the Chesapeake Bay Bridge, authorities acknowledged last night. Ismael Selim Elbarasse of Annandale, Va., long suspected by authorities of having financial ties to the Palestinian terrorist group, was taken into custody as a "material witness" in a Chicago terrorism case, according to Maryland's U.S. attorney's office. Elbarasse made an initial appearance in Baltimore's federal courthouse yesterday before U.S. District Magistrate Judge Paul W. Grimm.
NEWS
By Patricia Hurtado and Patricia Hurtado,NEWSDAY | November 8, 2003
NEW YORK - In a victory for the government's use of the material witness statute after the Sept. 11 attacks, a federal appeals court reinstated charges yesterday against a Jordanian whose name and telephone number were found in a car belonging to a hijacker. Osama Awadallah, 23, was indicted on charges that he lied to a federal grand jury about knowing Khalid Al-Midhar, one of the hijackers aboard American Airlines Flight 77, which hit the Pentagon. In April last year, U.S. District Court Judge Shira Scheindlin tossed out the case, calling the government's jailing of a material witness for a grand jury investigation unconstitutional.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2004
A Virginia man held 10 days as a material witness in a case involving the militant group Hamas was released from a Baltimore prison yesterday after his lawyer said friends put up their houses as collateral for a $1 million bond. Ismail Selim Elbarasse, 57, left the federal courthouse in Baltimore with lawyers. He made no comment. Last night, there was no one at his house in Annandale, Va. The decision to release him came after a federal judge held a closed-door detention hearing yesterday, continuing the secrecy that has surrounded his case from its unusual beginning on the Bay Bridge.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Alec MacGillis and Dan Fesperman and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2004
For six years, Ismail Selim Elbarasse stayed mostly out of the public eye, even if he never disappeared from the radar screen of federal investigators tracking the flow of money to militant Islamic groups in the Middle East. As a naturalized U.S. citizen who remained proudly supportive of his Palestinian homeland, Elbarasse, 57, lived a comfortable life in Northern Virginia. He did some accounting work while his six children advanced through colleges and public schools, earning academic honors along the way. "We are part of this country, we have been part of it for a long time, and we wouldn't think of hurting this community," American-born daughter Dua'a Elbarasse, 20, said yesterday.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | April 19, 2000
Investigators from the state attorney general's office will not prosecute suspended Westminster police Officer Richard A. Ruby, who was accused by two fellow officers of trying to plant drugs on suspects last summer, authorities said. The attorney general's investigation of Ruby is complete, the law enforcement authorities said yesterday. Ruby, 36, faces the result of an independent administrative inquiry by Maryland State Police at the request of Westminster Police Chief Roger Joneckis.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | April 19, 2000
Investigators from the state attorney general's office will not prosecute suspended Westminster police Officer Richard A. Ruby, who was accused by two fellow officers of trying to plant drugs on suspects last summer, authorities said. The attorney general's investigation of Ruby is complete, the law enforcement authorities said yesterday. Ruby, 36, faces the result of an independent administrative inquiry by Maryland State Police at the request of Westminster Police Chief Roger Joneckis.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2004
A Virginia man held 10 days as a material witness in a case involving the militant group Hamas was released from a Baltimore prison yesterday after his lawyer said friends put up their houses as collateral for a $1 million bond. Ismail Selim Elbarasse, 57, left the federal courthouse in Baltimore with lawyers. He made no comment. Last night, there was no one at his house in Annandale, Va. The decision to release him came after a federal judge held a closed-door detention hearing yesterday, continuing the secrecy that has surrounded his case from its unusual beginning on the Bay Bridge.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2004
A federal judge upheld yesterday the government's right to impose secrecy in court proceedings for Ismail Selim Elbarasse, the Virginia man who has not been charged with a crime but is being held in Baltimore as a material witness in a Chicago case involving the militant group Hamas. In his ruling, U.S. Magistrate Judge Paul W. Grimm said that in this case the importance of grand jury confidentiality trumps the public's right to access - a stance that continues a national pattern of secrecy surrounding these types of witnesses.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes Alec MacGillis and Dan Fesperman and Stephanie Hanes Alec MacGillis and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2004
Federal prosecutors have asked a judge to close a detention hearing scheduled for today for Ismail Selim Elbarasse, a Virginia man who is being held in Baltimore as a material witness in a Chicago case involving the militant group Hamas. An attorney for Elbarasse - who was detained Friday after his wife's videotaping of the Bay Bridge caught the attention of police - said the government is trying to hide from the public its "overreaching" and "rights violations." "They do this to protect themselves," said the lawyer, Stanley L. Cohen.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Alec MacGillis and Dan Fesperman and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2004
For six years, Ismail Selim Elbarasse stayed mostly out of the public eye, even if he never disappeared from the radar screen of federal investigators tracking the flow of money to militant Islamic groups in the Middle East. As a naturalized U.S. citizen who remained proudly supportive of his Palestinian homeland, Elbarasse, 57, lived a comfortable life in Northern Virginia. He did some accounting work while his six children advanced through colleges and public schools, earning academic honors along the way. "We are part of this country, we have been part of it for a long time, and we wouldn't think of hurting this community," American-born daughter Dua'a Elbarasse, 20, said yesterday.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2004
Ismail Selim Elbarasse is scheduled to go before a federal judge in Baltimore tomorrow and argue why he should not be imprisoned as a "material witness" in a Chicago racketeering case involving members of the militant group Hamas. He has not been charged with a crime, and despite assertions by federal investigators that he might have been surveying the Bay Bridge for a possible terrorist attack, his lawyers say they know of no investigation into his activities in Maryland. But federal prosecutors have said that it's necessary to detain Elbarasse - he is confined to a prison cell 23 hours a day - and they are expected to ask U.S. Magistrate Judge Paul W. Grimm to keep him in custody.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes, Lynn Anderson and Richard Irwin and Stephanie Hanes, Lynn Anderson and Richard Irwin,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2004
A man described in a federal indictment as a "high-ranking" Hamas operative was arrested in Maryland on Friday videotaping the Chesapeake Bay Bridge, authorities acknowledged last night. Ismael Selim Elbarasse of Annandale, Va., long suspected by authorities of having financial ties to the Palestinian terrorist group, was taken into custody as a "material witness" in a Chicago terrorism case, according to Maryland's U.S. attorney's office. Elbarasse made an initial appearance in Baltimore's federal courthouse yesterday before U.S. District Magistrate Judge Paul W. Grimm.
NEWS
By Tomas Alex Tizon and Richard B. Schmitt and Tomas Alex Tizon and Richard B. Schmitt,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 25, 2004
SEATTLE - An Oregon lawyer arrested in the train bombings in Madrid, Spain, was cleared of wrongdoing yesterday after the FBI determined it had misidentified a fingerprint on a bag of detonators. A federal judge threw out the case against Brandon Mayfield, a Muslim convert, who was arrested May 6 and held for two weeks as a material witness in the bombings that killed 197 people and injured 2,000. He was the first American linked to the attack. Spanish authorities identified the print as belonging to an Algerian last week.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | September 30, 2001
WHAT'S THE difference between being held as a material witness and being detained without trial? Anyone? Anyone? It's a question that has popped up since Sept. 11, when terrorists hijacked four jets and crashed two into the Word Trade Center twin towers and one into the Pentagon. Passengers apparently forced the fourth one down in a field in southwestern Pennsylvania. More than 6,000 people died as a result of the four crashes. The terrorism was indeed an act of war, and the FBI has questioned hundreds in pursuit of those who might have been co-conspirators in the attacks.
TOPIC
May 30, 2004
The World An explosion on a busy commercial street in Baghdad near the main entrance to the U.S.-led coalition government headquarters killed two British civilians. The United States and Britain presented a closed session of the U.N. Security Council with a draft of an agreement on a "sovereign interim government" for Iraq that would allow foreign troops to remain in the country for at least a year, subject to Iraqi review. Iyad Allawi, a secular Shiite member of the American-appointed Iraqi Governing Council with close ties to the CIA, was selected to be prime minister of Iraq's interim government.
NEWS
By Tomas Alex Tizon and Richard B. Schmitt and Tomas Alex Tizon and Richard B. Schmitt,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 25, 2004
SEATTLE - An Oregon lawyer arrested in the train bombings in Madrid, Spain, was cleared of wrongdoing yesterday after the FBI determined it had misidentified a fingerprint on a bag of detonators. A federal judge threw out the case against Brandon Mayfield, a Muslim convert, who was arrested May 6 and held for two weeks as a material witness in the bombings that killed 197 people and injured 2,000. He was the first American linked to the attack. Spanish authorities identified the print as belonging to an Algerian last week.
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