Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMaterial Girl
IN THE NEWS

Material Girl

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | June 15, 2004
Her relevance may be fading now, but it is still hard to imagine pop (the music and the culture) without Madonna. The ultimate chameleonic performer, she has dazzled and shocked us for two decades. Every two years or so, Miss Blond Ambition has emerged anew, the images morphing into something different: a Marilyn Monroe-inspired material girl became a gamine-like sex freak, which melted into a centered club queen, which changed into a doting mother of two, a seemingly loving wife and children's book author.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Meghan Daum | October 19, 2012
There goes Madonna, classing up the joint again. To show her support of Malala Yousafzai, the 14-year-old Pakistani girl shot and critically wounded by the Taliban because of her advocacy for girls' education, the Material Girl (a.k.a. Madge, Esther, the Queen of Pop, the Hottest Bod in the AARP) took the opportunity during a recent concert at L.A.'s Staples Center to pull her pants down and reveal a (fake) tattoo of the girl's name inked across the small of her back. Take that, Taliban!
Advertisement
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | March 11, 2001
Madonna's Material Girl was a trashy-glam bad chick. The unforgettable '80s fashion icon was a rebellious lass with a penchant for one-shoulder jersey dresses, ripped T-shirts, fishnet stockings and miniskirts paired with fat belts slung low on the hips. She favored unkempt hair festooned with black-lace bows, cut-off gloves and way too much eye-liner. And she's back. Just when we thought we had permanently expunged the Material Girl from pop culture, the fashion world decided to resurrect the defiant damsel this spring.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2011
The story goes that Reginald F. Lewis, the remarkably successful Baltimore-born lawyer, businessman and philanthropist, learned the value of saving money from his grandmother. She gave him a tin cup to hold his earnings from delivering papers when he was 10. There's a little extra resonance to that anecdote this weekend, as the institution that bears his name — the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture — celebrates its sixth anniversary with two days of free admission and community events.
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | August 13, 2008
UNTIL YOU'VE lost your reputation, you never realize what a burden it was or what freedom really is," said the great Gone with the Wind writer Margaret Mitchell. I wonder how "free" John Edwards is feeling these days? If Edwards thought by breaking his story of infidelity late Friday, as the Olympic Games began, that he'd soften the blow, he was greatly mistaken. The scandal grows, and the editors and reporters of the National Enquirer - who are now treated like Woodward and Bernstein by an embarrassed mainstream media - are smugly confident that there is oh-so-much more to reveal.
FEATURES
By Steve Morse and Steve Morse,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 10, 2001
When you see the Rolling Stones for as much as $300 per ticket, you know you're going to hear many of their hit songs. The same is true for other high-ticket acts such as U2, Rod Stewart, the Eagles and Bette Midler. But not Madonna. The Material Girl, at the MCI Center in Washington tonight and tomorrow night, is smashing assumptions once again. She has decided that fans paying as much as $245 for her arena shows will get just a smattering of old hits (three, in fact) while she instead features songs from her last two techno-spiced albums, which have kept her as au courant as any 40-some- thing can be. She has thrown out the rule book.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | March 13, 1993
If you can wade through hip-deep hype and abide the carniva barker whine that Robin Leach has refined to a high art, you will actually find a core of fascinating biography in "Madonna: Exposed," a two-hour special at 10 tonight on WNUV-Channel 54.The most interesting moments come in contemplating a series of still photographs, a curiously static way to appreciate the pop star perhaps best known for the way she moves.No, these are not the famous nude photos from her 1992 book "Sex" (although we see quite a few of these in the show)
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | December 3, 2000
We are living in a material world, and I am a material girl. So spoke that great American philosopher, Madonna. Well, it's Madonna's time of the year in more ways than one. But the Material Girl probably never stood in a driving rain for just one more cast, shivered in a tree stand waiting for "Mr. Right" to come along or tried to negotiate a muddy trail. On second thought, maybe she has. Have you seen her videos? If you're seeking a present for your outdoorsman, woman or kiddo, here are a few suggestions: Socks.
NEWS
November 18, 2010
It's to laugh Judging by all the talent headed this way, there might be no funnier place in the entire world than Baltimore this weekend. First up is the master of his domain himself, Jerry Seinfeld , training his bemused, all-observant eye on the world and the people in it. He'll be at the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 1212 Cathedral St., for two shows Friday, at 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Tickets are $62-$77. Also Friday, over at the Hippodrome Theatre at the France-Merrick Performing Arts Center, it's the ever-opinionated Bill Maher , who undoubtedly will be casting aspersions on politics, religion, popular culture and anything else that crosses his mind.
NEWS
By Meghan Daum | October 19, 2012
There goes Madonna, classing up the joint again. To show her support of Malala Yousafzai, the 14-year-old Pakistani girl shot and critically wounded by the Taliban because of her advocacy for girls' education, the Material Girl (a.k.a. Madge, Esther, the Queen of Pop, the Hottest Bod in the AARP) took the opportunity during a recent concert at L.A.'s Staples Center to pull her pants down and reveal a (fake) tattoo of the girl's name inked across the small of her back. Take that, Taliban!
NEWS
November 18, 2010
It's to laugh Judging by all the talent headed this way, there might be no funnier place in the entire world than Baltimore this weekend. First up is the master of his domain himself, Jerry Seinfeld , training his bemused, all-observant eye on the world and the people in it. He'll be at the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 1212 Cathedral St., for two shows Friday, at 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Tickets are $62-$77. Also Friday, over at the Hippodrome Theatre at the France-Merrick Performing Arts Center, it's the ever-opinionated Bill Maher , who undoubtedly will be casting aspersions on politics, religion, popular culture and anything else that crosses his mind.
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | August 13, 2008
UNTIL YOU'VE lost your reputation, you never realize what a burden it was or what freedom really is," said the great Gone with the Wind writer Margaret Mitchell. I wonder how "free" John Edwards is feeling these days? If Edwards thought by breaking his story of infidelity late Friday, as the Olympic Games began, that he'd soften the blow, he was greatly mistaken. The scandal grows, and the editors and reporters of the National Enquirer - who are now treated like Woodward and Bernstein by an embarrassed mainstream media - are smugly confident that there is oh-so-much more to reveal.
FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun Reporter | April 2, 2007
Over the years, Madonna has evolved both in music and fashion. As the controversial pop star has matured, so has her taste in clothes. Nowhere is that more evident than in the second year of her collaboration with H&M, a clothing line called M by Madonna. Last year, the hip chain of cheap chic clothing sold a Madonna track suit and reported that the sporty ensemble was a success with its younger shoppers. This year, the partnership between the two continues with a more mature, sophisticated and fashion-forward line of clothing and accessories: soft and slinky dresses, stylish trench coats, clutch bags, leather belts and the must-have of any good collection, Hollywood glam-girl sunglasses.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | June 15, 2004
Her relevance may be fading now, but it is still hard to imagine pop (the music and the culture) without Madonna. The ultimate chameleonic performer, she has dazzled and shocked us for two decades. Every two years or so, Miss Blond Ambition has emerged anew, the images morphing into something different: a Marilyn Monroe-inspired material girl became a gamine-like sex freak, which melted into a centered club queen, which changed into a doting mother of two, a seemingly loving wife and children's book author.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brian McCollum and Brian McCollum,Knight Ridder / Tribune | December 9, 2001
As if. Britney Spears -- the new Madonna? The longer the teen queen sticks around, the more she garners comparisons to the 43-year-old pop diva. On the surface, the analogy seems to work: Both are female superstars who earned their names with suggestive dance music and provocatively choreographed videos. But that's about as far as you can reasonably stretch it -- despite the best efforts of Spears herself, whose new album, Britney, seeks to establish her as a grown-up career artist a la Madonna.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,Sun Staff | August 26, 2001
As the hottest thing going round this summer, Madonna on the Drowned World Tour sent me spiraling back to an observation on her sociological significance. "What I like about her is her utter defiance. She knows all the rules and stereotypes, and always takes them a step further to poke fun at them. Madonna has made a brilliant career of playing on many of the old myths about women to create a new one -- the siren who is clearly in charge, clearly calling the shots in her own life." That was me, dear reader, writing in 1990 in the Chicago Tribune.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | September 11, 1992
NEW YORK -- Before the grunts, ground strokes and shopping sprees turned her into the most notorious material woman of tennis, before she ditched Wimbledon for a vacation at Donald Trump's estate in Florida, before she dyed her hair several shades of blond, brunette and black, Monica Seles was just a kid growing up in Novi Sad, Yugoslavia.She coveted the Chris Evert-autographed racket her parents brought her from a trip to the West. She tacked a poster of Martina Navratilova to her bedroom wall.
FEATURES
By Steve Morse and Steve Morse,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 10, 2001
When you see the Rolling Stones for as much as $300 per ticket, you know you're going to hear many of their hit songs. The same is true for other high-ticket acts such as U2, Rod Stewart, the Eagles and Bette Midler. But not Madonna. The Material Girl, at the MCI Center in Washington tonight and tomorrow night, is smashing assumptions once again. She has decided that fans paying as much as $245 for her arena shows will get just a smattering of old hits (three, in fact) while she instead features songs from her last two techno-spiced albums, which have kept her as au courant as any 40-some- thing can be. She has thrown out the rule book.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.