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Matchmaker

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NEWS
August 26, 1992
He's not a big guy, doesn't know diddly about sports (by his own admission) and you wouldn't recognize him if he sat down in the next booth to have coffee. Yet, he's one of the biggest sports heroes in this town at the moment.He's Herb Belgrad. As chairman of the Maryland Stadium Authority, he has worked tirelessly for the last several years to get Oriole Park at Camden Yards built and to try to convince the National Football League to return a franchise to Baltimore. He's now this city's behind-the-scenes matchmaker, attempting to get the Baltimore-NFL marriage all arranged.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2014
From Rep. Elijah E. Cummings playing a leading role in televised hearings on American deaths in Benghazi, to the Game Show Network visiting a Baltimore church to play matchmaker for a member of the congregation, there is going to be a distinct local flavor to summertime TV this year. Here are 10 shows, stories and trends to look for in and on Baltimore television in coming weeks - for better or worse. “It Takes a Church” debuts at 9 p.m. Thursday on GSN. The reality-TV series hosted by gospel singer Natalie Grant visits a different church each week and, with the help of the pastor and congregation members, plays the dating game.
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NEWS
By Jay Merwin and Jay Merwin,Evening Sun Staff | December 3, 1991
Bert Miller was divorced and eager to remarry, but only within the relatively small pool of Orthodox Jews like himself.So he traveled from Baltimore to Brooklyn, N.Y., for a date with Mindy, only to find a message that she wouldn't be available until the next day. Wanting to make full use of his time after a trek of 200 miles, Miller called on a matchmaker in New Jersey. While he was there, Miller overheard the matchmaker ask his wife, "Did you get that call from Rachelle?""Is that Rachelle Chrystol from Irvington, N.J.?"
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2011
The Maryland/Israel Development Center sees itself as a matchmaker — not of a romantic kind but an economic one. For the past 19 years, the nonprofit group in Baltimore has been connecting Maryland companies with Israeli partners to promote trade and investments. Most recently, MIDC helped secure funding for two Maryland companies to do business with Israeli firms through the Israel-U.S. Binational Industrial Research and Development (BIRD) Foundation. Direct Dimensions is a 3-D imaging technology firm in Owings Mills and Ariadne is a biotech software company in Rockville.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | September 25, 2008
It's a mark of what goes wrong with Center Stage's production of The Matchmaker that the show's two indelible performances are delivered by actors playing minor roles. Pamela Payton-Wright, as Flora, an addled, aging romantic, and Lawrence O'Dwyer, as the philosopher-rogue Malachi, deliver a master class in acting. Each word seemingly erupts from their hearts and brains. When Payton-Wright carries a teacup across the room, she holds it in front of her as if it were a fragrant bouquet. O'Dwyer even staggers drunkenly in character.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1997
"The Matchmaker" is so full of blarney, it practically dances its own jig.It's so obsessed with Ireland, you'd swear the sky was green.It's so full of the Irish, you'll walk out of the theater sticking an O' in front of your name and singing "Danny Boy."And if all that sounds like nothing short of an "Erin go bragh" overdose well, it is. Save for one very redeeming grace.That would be Janeane Garofalo, whose benevolently cynical demeanor -- not to mention 100-watt smile -- turns what could have been an annoyingly cute pastiche of quirky Irish stereotypes into a charmer that manages to remain just this side of overbearing.
NEWS
By SALLY BUCKLER | November 17, 1994
It's almost show time at Glenelg High School. The Glenelg Drama Department is now in rehearsal for Thornton Wilder's "The Matchmaker," which it will present Dec. 2 and Dec. 3 at 8 p.m. and Dec. 4 at 3 p.m. This hilarious comedy, the inspiration for "Hello, Dolly," takes place in Yonkers and New York City around the turn of the century.Ron Oaks directs the play, and student directors Jason Murray and Kathryn Hughes help him. Linda Simms and Peggy Loyd are developing costumes, and the Glenelg stagecraft class is building four stylized sets for the comedy.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | January 29, 1999
Harold Weston, a former welterweight contender who served as a matchmaker for both Madison Square Garden and Don King, is the latest promoter to test the Baltimore-Washington fight market.Weston, who lost titles in the late 1970s against both Jose "Pipino" Cuevas and Wilfred Benitez, will work in cooperation with local promoter Stuart Satosky in staging the Feb. 5 card at the Pikesville Armory.The ESPN2 show will match Washington junior middleweights Andrew Council and Michael Ward, with Maryland junior welterweight contender Reggie Green defending his North American Boxing Federation belt against Jesus Rodriguez, of Mexico.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 1, 2004
As the happily meddling title character in The Matchmaker at Ford's Theatre, Andrea Martin is so warm and engaging, she can look straight out at the audience and declare "We're all fools," and it comes across as a compliment. Martin's character is Dolly Levi, and if that name sounds familiar, it's because Thornton Wilder's 1954 play is the basis of the Broadway musical Hello, Dolly! Wilder had titled an earlier - unsuccessful - version of the play, The Merchant of Yonkers, after the businessman Dolly connives into marrying her. But it wasn't until the playwright changed the emphasis to Dolly that the play found its audience.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2001
For centuries, Jewish families seeking suitable mates for their daughters and sons have employed the services of a matchmaker, an honored figure in the community who acts as a counselor, a diplomat and a reliable source of neighborhood news. Nancy Granat, a former corporate manager with a degree in counseling, is a matchmaker for the new millennium. "You have personal trainers. You have financial consultants," said Granat, 59, a grandmother whose tools are a computer database and her intuition.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Amazon.com; Publishers Weekly | January 11, 2009
tuesday Snark : by David Denby (Simon & Schuster, $15.95). New Yorker critic and best-selling author David Denby takes on the snarkers, naming the nine principles of snark - the standard techniques its practitioners use to poison their arrows. Snarkers like to think they are deploying wit, but mostly they are exposing the seethe and snarl of an unhappy country, releasing bad feeling but little laughter. The Best of Everything : by Kimberla Lawson Roby (Morrow, $23.95). Alicia Black Sullivan swore to never repeat her father's mistakes: She would never break any promises, she would never be unfaithful.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | September 25, 2008
It's a mark of what goes wrong with Center Stage's production of The Matchmaker that the show's two indelible performances are delivered by actors playing minor roles. Pamela Payton-Wright, as Flora, an addled, aging romantic, and Lawrence O'Dwyer, as the philosopher-rogue Malachi, deliver a master class in acting. Each word seemingly erupts from their hearts and brains. When Payton-Wright carries a teacup across the room, she holds it in front of her as if it were a fragrant bouquet. O'Dwyer even staggers drunkenly in character.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun movie critic | February 2, 2007
If grating is what you are looking for, then by all means, don't miss Because I Said So. Watching this movie, with Diane Keaton cast as the ne plus ultra of irritating, overbearing mothers, is roughly the equivalent of listening to fingernails on a chalkboard for nearly two hours. With her skittishness and her near-constant state of fluster, Keaton as a comic actress can be wonderfully endearing, the sort of lovable ditz you can laugh with and desperately want to protect. But here, as a mother who can't bear the thought of her lovelorn daughter (Mandy Moore)
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,special to the sun | January 31, 2007
The staff at the Howard County Central Library still remembers the day a patron walked in not with a book to return, but a warm apple pie. "Please give this to Marge Trautman. I'm so grateful for the books she's recommended," the woman said, according to reference librarian Kathy Lewis. Trautman, a longtime Howard County librarian, is retiring Friday after a 28-year career. Her reputation as a matchmaker between books and people won her a loyal following of patrons, and the occasional apple pie. Trautman has done everything from driving a Bookmobile to serving as interim manager at the central library - her current position.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,special to the sun | September 15, 2006
Fiddler on the Roof is called a classic with good reason -- just about everyone knows the story of a father struggling to hang onto religious and family traditions, or some of its many enduring philosophical songs, including "If I Were a Rich Man," "Matchmaker, Matchmaker" and "Sunrise, Sunset." Making the 1964 musical seem fresh requires a great cast and crew.
FEATURES
By DAN THANH DANG and DAN THANH DANG,SUN REPORTER | February 11, 2006
Time for a pop quiz, class. On Tuesday, Feb. 14, I will: A. Snuggle up with my boo, eating oysters and bonbons while sipping champagne in a steamy bath filled with tons of sweet-smelling rose petals. B. Nothing. Valentine's Day is out to destroy me. All those who answered A may be excused. Cookies, ice cream and a ticker tape parade await all you lovebirds outside. Enjoy. We thrill for you. Really. All you lonely Bs, however, please roll up your sleeves. We've got a lot of ground to cover, and there's little time to waste.
FEATURES
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 7, 1998
JERUSALEM -- Matchmaker Joanna Weiss wouldn't argue with the ancient Judaic pronouncement that holds, "It is as difficult for a person to find his mate as the splitting of the Red Sea."Of all the men and women she has introduced to each other in 20 years, not a single couple has married.But is that stopping her? No way."It's a desert out there. There are a lot of lonely people," Weiss tells her fellow matchmakers gathered here recently for a day of morale-boosting, consciousness-raising and name-trading.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Amazon.com; Publishers Weekly | January 11, 2009
tuesday Snark : by David Denby (Simon & Schuster, $15.95). New Yorker critic and best-selling author David Denby takes on the snarkers, naming the nine principles of snark - the standard techniques its practitioners use to poison their arrows. Snarkers like to think they are deploying wit, but mostly they are exposing the seethe and snarl of an unhappy country, releasing bad feeling but little laughter. The Best of Everything : by Kimberla Lawson Roby (Morrow, $23.95). Alicia Black Sullivan swore to never repeat her father's mistakes: She would never break any promises, she would never be unfaithful.
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 11, 2006
Barron Stroud, a lawyer who lives in Howard County and works in Baltimore, wanted to join the board of a local arts organization, but he didn't know where to start. "I didn't know how to sort out, in Howard County, what the different arts groups did, who had an interest to adding to their board, who had a need," he said. Coleen West, meanwhile, was looking for fresh talent to join the board of the Howard County Arts Council. The two found each other through the Board Bank, an alliance that helps interested volunteers find seats on the boards of nonprofit organizations.
NEWS
By Pat Burson and Pat Burson,Newsday | August 7, 2005
In the new comedy Wedding Crashers, two divorce mediators and longtime friends get their kicks by inviting themselves to other people's weddings. They scarf down hors d'oeuvres, drink from the open bar, tear up the dance floor and compete to meet -- and bed -- bodacious bridesmaids and other single women. For singles who have their minds on something more meaningful than a roll in the hay, professional matchmakers, wedding professionals and relationship experts agree, weddings can be the ideal place to meet someone special.
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