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By Don Markus and Don Markus,Staff Writer | September 9, 1993
NEW YORK -- Although statistics are not kept on comebacks at the U.S. Open, Wally Masur's return from the brink of elimination Tuesday night against fellow Australian Jamie Morgan had to be among the best at a Grand Slam event.After losing the first two sets, Masur came back to even their fourth-round match, only to fall behind 5-0 in the fifth set. What happened after that was difficult for even Masur to imagine, and apparently hard for Morgan to digest.Masur won the last seven games of the match, a stretch that began with 16 straight points and ended with the 30-year-old journeyman advancing to his first Open quarterfinal and his first Grand Slam quarter since the 1983 Australian Open.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | April 30, 2008
Time was when orchestras toured with lots of music from their homeland, a way of passing out proud calling cards. Then along came globalization, or at least European Unionism. When the Orchestre National de France arrived Monday night at the Kennedy Center for a Washington Performing Arts Society presentation, it brought along its German music director and an all-German program. And when it gives two concerts this week in New York, only one French piece will make it alongside hefty German, Russian and Czech fare.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | April 30, 2008
Time was when orchestras toured with lots of music from their homeland, a way of passing out proud calling cards. Then along came globalization, or at least European Unionism. When the Orchestre National de France arrived Monday night at the Kennedy Center for a Washington Performing Arts Society presentation, it brought along its German music director and an all-German program. And when it gives two concerts this week in New York, only one French piece will make it alongside hefty German, Russian and Czech fare.
NEWS
February 6, 2005
On Friday, February 4, 2005, ELLIOT SCHREIDER, loving husband Eunice Schreider (nee Binder), beloved father of Jay H. Schreider of Reisterstown, MD and Steven R. Schreider of Gulf Port, MS, devoted father-in-law of Abbie F. Schreider, devoted brother of Eleanor Bronstein of Pompano Beach, FL, Marlena Masur of Newington, CT and the late Stanley Schreider and Miriam Egdall. Beloved brother-in-law of Wally Masur, Judy Schreider, Ethyl and Stanley Sugarman, Bee and Ove Kongsted and the late Al Bronstein and Henry Egdall.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Staff Writer | September 10, 1993
NEW YORK -- Wallyball took over the U.S. Open again yesterday. Not the sport that has become all the rage at health clubs, but a game that has become something of a dinosaur in men's tennis.Its chief practitioner is a 30-year-old Australian, a journeyman who has made a career of beating the rich and famous on his favorite surface -- grass -- and has had a history of early exits at the National Tennis Center.It's a game of old-school finesse in a high-tech age, a game in which players move their opponents around the court instead of trying to obliterate them into submission.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 21, 2002
Kurt Masur is currently winding down an 11-year tenure as music director of the New York Philharmonic. By most accounts, a battle of wills between the music director and the (now former) executive director led the board of directors to terminate Masur's evergreen arrangement for renewing his contract. It apparently boiled down to a who's-really-in-charge issue, and an administrator won out over an artist. Never a good sign. At 74, Masur still has a lot to offer. The London Philharmonic and Orchestre National de France will be the beneficiaries after this season, while the New York ensemble welcomes Lorin Maazel to the podium (and many folks just scratch their heads in amazement)
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | October 27, 1993
The Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra was 97 years old when Felix Mendelssohn became its conductor in 1840.At 250 years of age, it is Europe's oldest orchestra, and its concert Wednesday night at the Kennedy Center under its music director Kurt Masur made one wish that its traditions continue to be vibrant as long as Western symphonic music is performed.Orchestral playing in Leipzig has not surrendered to the internationalization of style to which orchestras in Western Europe and North America long ago succumbed.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler | September 8, 1991
One of the best things about living in Baltimore is that you can get to New York in 2 1/2 hours, Washington in 45 minutes and Philadelphia in 75. Here is a sampling of the many concerts in those cities worth making the trip for:WASHINGTON*Nobody plays Mozart's piano concertos better than Murray Perahia, who will perform and conduct three of them (K. 413, 482 and 503) with the Orpheus Chamber Ensemble at the Kennedy Center on Oct. 6.NEW YORK*The great Kurt Masur is the New York Philharmonic's new music director, and his presence has made the orchestra a hot ticket for the first time since the Bernstein era ended more than 20 years ago. One of Masur's greatest strengths is Bruckner, and it's no accident that this composer's mighty Symphony No. 7 -- along with music by John Adams and Aaron Copland -- is featured in the orchestra's first concerts with Masur (Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | November 21, 1999
There are more than 70 recordings of Beethoven's Fourth Concerto currently available. Make room at the top for Helene Grimaud's new account of the piece, recorded live with Kurt Masur conducting the New York Philharmonic (Teldec 3984-26869).I think this is the most exciting interpretation of the Fourth Concerto since the Vladimir Ashkenazy-Georg Solti collaboration with the Chicago Symphony -- and that was recorded almost 30 years ago!Without eschewing lyricism, Grimaud and Masur strive for drama, and they achieve it thrillingly.
FEATURES
By New York Daily News | June 2, 1991
As just about everybody knows by now, Zubin Mehta has left his post as music director of the New York Philharmonic -- his final concert was Schoenberg's "Gurrelieder" this past Tuesday.He departs after a tenure of 13 years -- the longest any conductor in the Philharmonic's history has had the job. He does this at age 55 -- young for a conductor (his successor, Kurt Masur, is seven years older). As a result, Mr. Mehta will hardly be idle in the foreseeable future. He will still retain his position as music director for life of the Israel Philharmonic, and he'll keep active in the recording studio for the Sony and Telarc labels.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 21, 2002
Kurt Masur is currently winding down an 11-year tenure as music director of the New York Philharmonic. By most accounts, a battle of wills between the music director and the (now former) executive director led the board of directors to terminate Masur's evergreen arrangement for renewing his contract. It apparently boiled down to a who's-really-in-charge issue, and an administrator won out over an artist. Never a good sign. At 74, Masur still has a lot to offer. The London Philharmonic and Orchestre National de France will be the beneficiaries after this season, while the New York ensemble welcomes Lorin Maazel to the podium (and many folks just scratch their heads in amazement)
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | December 2, 1999
Anyone who considers the Junior League a white-gloved gaggle of ladies who do lunch and talk about doing good should meet Mary Ann Masur, president of the Junior League of Baltimore. "We're not afraid to get our hands dirty," she says. "The gloves are off. It's not like we go to tea parties every day. That's not what it's all about," says Masur, listing some of the League's long roster of hands-on projects in Baltimore, from the Hampden Family Center to the Dream Catchers program at Port Discovery.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | November 21, 1999
There are more than 70 recordings of Beethoven's Fourth Concerto currently available. Make room at the top for Helene Grimaud's new account of the piece, recorded live with Kurt Masur conducting the New York Philharmonic (Teldec 3984-26869).I think this is the most exciting interpretation of the Fourth Concerto since the Vladimir Ashkenazy-Georg Solti collaboration with the Chicago Symphony -- and that was recorded almost 30 years ago!Without eschewing lyricism, Grimaud and Masur strive for drama, and they achieve it thrillingly.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | October 27, 1993
The Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra was 97 years old when Felix Mendelssohn became its conductor in 1840.At 250 years of age, it is Europe's oldest orchestra, and its concert Wednesday night at the Kennedy Center under its music director Kurt Masur made one wish that its traditions continue to be vibrant as long as Western symphonic music is performed.Orchestral playing in Leipzig has not surrendered to the internationalization of style to which orchestras in Western Europe and North America long ago succumbed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | October 1, 1993
Here's a prediction: Within the next 10 years, conductor Hans Vonk will be as famous in this country as Kurt Masur or Wolfgang Sawallisch.That opinion is based on the superb Brahms Fourth Symphony the Dutch conductor gave with the Baltimore Symphony two years ago and the even better Tchaikovsky Sixth Symphony he delivered last night with the same orchestra in Meyerhoff Hall.Vonk is well-known in Europe -- he's currently chief conductor of the Cologne Radio Symphony and a former music director of the Dresden State Orchestra -- but the United States is always slow in these matters because we tend to listen to hype more closely than we do to music.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Staff Writer | September 11, 1993
NEW YORK -- There's a 24-year-old Frenchman whose coach left for Paris Monday, probably thinking his prized pupil wasn't too far behind. There's a 30-year-old Australian who longs for the days of wooden rackets and longer points. There's a 26-year-old Russian who is in the middle of his honeymoon.And there's a 22-year-old American who simply might be the best tennis player in the world.That's how today's men's semifinals of the U.S. Open shake out at the National Tennis Center: It's No. 2 seed Pete Sampras and The Other Guys.
NEWS
February 6, 2005
On Friday, February 4, 2005, ELLIOT SCHREIDER, loving husband Eunice Schreider (nee Binder), beloved father of Jay H. Schreider of Reisterstown, MD and Steven R. Schreider of Gulf Port, MS, devoted father-in-law of Abbie F. Schreider, devoted brother of Eleanor Bronstein of Pompano Beach, FL, Marlena Masur of Newington, CT and the late Stanley Schreider and Miriam Egdall. Beloved brother-in-law of Wally Masur, Judy Schreider, Ethyl and Stanley Sugarman, Bee and Ove Kongsted and the late Al Bronstein and Henry Egdall.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | October 1, 1993
Here's a prediction: Within the next 10 years, conductor Hans Vonk will be as famous in this country as Kurt Masur or Wolfgang Sawallisch.That opinion is based on the superb Brahms Fourth Symphony the Dutch conductor gave with the Baltimore Symphony two years ago and the even better Tchaikovsky Sixth Symphony he delivered last night with the same orchestra in Meyerhoff Hall.Vonk is well-known in Europe -- he's currently chief conductor of the Cologne Radio Symphony and a former music director of the Dresden State Orchestra -- but the United States is always slow in these matters because we tend to listen to hype more closely than we do to music.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Staff Writer | September 10, 1993
NEW YORK -- Wallyball took over the U.S. Open again yesterday. Not the sport that has become all the rage at health clubs, but a game that has become something of a dinosaur in men's tennis.Its chief practitioner is a 30-year-old Australian, a journeyman who has made a career of beating the rich and famous on his favorite surface -- grass -- and has had a history of early exits at the National Tennis Center.It's a game of old-school finesse in a high-tech age, a game in which players move their opponents around the court instead of trying to obliterate them into submission.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Staff Writer | September 9, 1993
NEW YORK -- Although statistics are not kept on comebacks at the U.S. Open, Wally Masur's return from the brink of elimination Tuesday night against fellow Australian Jamie Morgan had to be among the best at a Grand Slam event.After losing the first two sets, Masur came back to even their fourth-round match, only to fall behind 5-0 in the fifth set. What happened after that was difficult for even Masur to imagine, and apparently hard for Morgan to digest.Masur won the last seven games of the match, a stretch that began with 16 straight points and ended with the 30-year-old journeyman advancing to his first Open quarterfinal and his first Grand Slam quarter since the 1983 Australian Open.
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