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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 8, 2011
Lucretia Billings Fisher, the leader of an early effort to save Fells Point and Federal Hill from a 1960s interstate highway, died of renal failure Friday at her Ruxton home. She was 98. "Lu Fisher was way ahead of her time," said former Judge Thomas Ward, a fellow preservationist and former City Council member. "There weren't too many people who saw the possibilities of those neighborhoods when she did. " Born Lucretia Billings in Pittsburgh, she attended the Masters School in Dobbs Ferry, N.Y. Her father was a prominent physician and her mother was a Mayflower descendant.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 8, 2011
Lucretia Billings Fisher, the leader of an early effort to save Fells Point and Federal Hill from a 1960s interstate highway, died of renal failure Friday at her Ruxton home. She was 98. "Lu Fisher was way ahead of her time," said former Judge Thomas Ward, a fellow preservationist and former City Council member. "There weren't too many people who saw the possibilities of those neighborhoods when she did. " Born Lucretia Billings in Pittsburgh, she attended the Masters School in Dobbs Ferry, N.Y. Her father was a prominent physician and her mother was a Mayflower descendant.
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NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2010
There are at least four Neha Deshpandes. There is Neha the scholar, who earned her first A in a college course as an eighth-grader and will graduate Thursday after finishing her pre-med track at the Johns Hopkins University in three years. There is Neha the researcher, who nagged a Rutgers professor into letting her work in his genetics lab at age 13, and is attempting to publish research comparing 70 mother-child pairs in Baltimore and India. That Neha recently won a $30,000 Truman Scholarship, which she'll use to study transplant outcomes in the next year in medically underserved sections of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2010
There are at least four Neha Deshpandes. There is Neha the scholar, who earned her first A in a college course as an eighth-grader and will graduate Thursday after finishing her pre-med track at the Johns Hopkins University in three years. There is Neha the researcher, who nagged a Rutgers professor into letting her work in his genetics lab at age 13, and is attempting to publish research comparing 70 mother-child pairs in Baltimore and India. That Neha recently won a $30,000 Truman Scholarship, which she'll use to study transplant outcomes in the next year in medically underserved sections of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Sun Staff Writer | August 27, 1995
A team of kung fu practitioners in Essex has prepared for a once-in-a-lifetime trip to China to study under the watchful eyes of Shaolin Temple monks whose predecessors created the art 15 centuries ago.But the trip pales compared with the long road each martial arts student has traveled already, away from self-destruction or seemingly unbearable trauma.And as they practiced daily for their monthlong trip, which starts today, they remained dedicated to avoiding the violence, drug trafficking, prostitution and other problems of their decaying eastern Baltimore County neighborhoods.
NEWS
November 4, 1990
Lindsay Rogan-Gilligan, a Jungian psychotherapist in Washington for about eight years and a Columbia resident, died Oct. 21 of cancer at the Stella Maris Hospice.Mrs. Rogan-Gilligan, who was 47 and lived on Currycomb Court, was a former president of the Washington Society for Jungian Psychology.A native of Glendale, Ohio, the former Lindsay Rogan was raised in Charlottesville, Va. She was a graduate of the Masters School in Dobbs Ferry, N.Y., Pine Manor College in Chestnut Hill, Mass., and the Katherine Gibbs Secretarial School in New York City.
NEWS
July 22, 2004
Ellen Bruce Bordley, a homemaker and benefactor of the arts, died in her sleep Tuesday at Roland Park Place. She was 96. She was born Ellen Bruce Fisher in Baltimore and raised in the 700 block of Park Ave. and at a summer home in Ruxton. She attended Bryn Mawr School and the Masters School in Dobbs Ferry, N.Y. "After leaving Masters, she traveled in Europe for a year before returning to Baltimore, where she made her debut in 1926 at the Bachelors Cotillon," said a daughter, Ellen Bruce Gibbs of Sparks.
NEWS
June 8, 2005
Cecil G. Locke, a homemaker and former Garrison Forest resident, died of congestive heart failure Thursday at Blakehurst Retirement Community in Towson, where she had lived for five years. She was 88. Born and raised in Baltimore, the former Cecil Gibson was a descendant of George Carr Grundy, whose manor house, Bolton, stood at the site of the Fifth Regiment Armory near today's Bolton Hill neighborhood. She attended the Calvert School, Bryn Mawr School and the Masters School in Dobbs Ferry, N.Y. She made her debut at the Bachelors Cotillon in 1935.
NEWS
September 20, 2007
Nancy G. Trimble, a homemaker and antiques collector, died Sept. 12 at St. Joseph Medical Center of complications from a fall. She had celebrated her 96th birthday the day before her death. Born Nancy Gordon Carroll and raised in Baltimore, she was a descendant of Chief Justice John Marshall, Supreme Court Justice Samuel Chase and John Hanson, who served as president of the Continental Congress during the American Revolution. She was a 1929 graduate of the Masters School in Dobbs Ferry, N.Y., and made her debut at the Bachelors Cotillon.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | December 24, 2009
Suzanne D. McShane, a former educator, volunteer and longtime hospital board member, died Dec. 15 of pulmonary fibrosis at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. She was 78. Suzanne Deeds was born and raised in Hartford, Conn., and Farmington, Conn. She was a 1949 graduate of the Masters School in Dobbs Ferry, N.Y., and earned an associate's degree in childhood education from the old Bennett Junior College in Millbrook, N.Y. After college, she owned and operated a small nursery school in Farmington before her marriage in 1953 to John L. McShane, a Baltimore architect.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Sun Staff Writer | August 27, 1995
A team of kung fu practitioners in Essex has prepared for a once-in-a-lifetime trip to China to study under the watchful eyes of Shaolin Temple monks whose predecessors created the art 15 centuries ago.But the trip pales compared with the long road each martial arts student has traveled already, away from self-destruction or seemingly unbearable trauma.And as they practiced daily for their monthlong trip, which starts today, they remained dedicated to avoiding the violence, drug trafficking, prostitution and other problems of their decaying eastern Baltimore County neighborhoods.
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