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BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay | May 18, 2011
If you encounter a sticky situation when you try to use your Visa or MasterCard at a store, there's another way to report a possible violation than just calling the toll-free customer service number.  I discovered MasterCard's online merchant violation forms via Consumerist , and it turns out Visa has one as well. For MasterCard's merchant violation form , you must choose from one of several options: either you were charged a fee to use your credit card, or required identification, or refused to accept a MasterCard even though they displayed a MasterCard logo.
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NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | April 15, 2014
Cash or credit? Cash: At the Hot Stove restaurant on Cape Cod, which I visit every summer vacation for one of their tasty burgers served on English muffins, patrons must pay their tab in cash or by check. A few years ago, the pub stopped taking credit cards to avoid paying transaction fees to Visa and MasterCard. There's an on-site ATM for customers unaware of the new policy. If this sounds like a stupid, even selfish business decision, think again: Each year the Hot Stove's owners donate the amount saved in transaction fees to local charities.
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BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | March 30, 2012
MasterCard and Visa are warning banks nationwide of a massive breach at an unnamed U.S-based credit card processor, potentially involving as more than 10 million card numbers could be compromised, according to the blog, KrebsonSecurity . Blogger Brian Krebs says Visa and MasterCard started alerting banks to the problem late last week. So far, Krebs says, the compromised cards seemed to be concentrated in the New York City area. I will post more information from MasterCard and Visa when it comes in. Update 3: Response from MasterCard  "MasterCard is currently investigating a potential account data compromise event of a U.S.-based entity and, as a result,  we have alerted payment card issuers regarding certain MasterCard accounts that are potentially at risk.
NEWS
June 10, 2013
Regarding recent reports of the massive government surveillance program carried out by the National Security Agency ("Surveillance state," June 7), as a college student in 1970 I worked at night for Maryland National Bank's downtown Mastercard headquarters as a telephone authorizer of charge card sales. A friend of mine who was a student as well and who worked nights for C & P Telephone Company told me then to be careful what I said on the phone, because the company was routinely tapping calls in the Johns Hopkins University area.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | May 26, 2006
NEW YORK -- Shares of MasterCard Inc., whose initial public offering raised less than its backers had hoped, soared 18 percent in the first day of trading. MasterCard surged $7 yesterday to close at $46 on the New York Stock Exchange. The world's No. 2 credit-card company raised $2.39 billion Wednesday in its IPO and priced its shares at $39 each, a dollar less than its minimum forecast. "We've seen some choppiness in the market in the last few weeks, and ultimately the market decides what a company is worth," Robert Selander, chief executive officer of MasterCard, said in an interview.
BUSINESS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau | September 3, 1992
NEW YORK -- In a risky move to capture a greater share of the saturated credit-card market, General Electric Capital started issuing a new MasterCard yesterday that gives consumers a novel array of rebates, rewards and coupons.Called "GE Rewards," the card works like a regular MasterCard but gives members a $10 check for every $500 of purchases. The checks can be redeemed at 24 participating stores, entertainment services and travel businesses. Each of these companies also plans to give cardholders $10 coupons each quarter and a variety of other rebates.
NEWS
By Joseph Menn and Joseph Menn,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 18, 2005
In the largest reported breach of personal data, hackers infiltrated the computers at a credit card processing center and stole as many as 40 million card numbers, MasterCard International disclosed yesterday. MasterCard said card numbers and expiration dates were harvested by a rogue program planted inside the computer network at CardSystems Inc., one of the low-profile firms that process merchant requests for credit-card authorization. When a retailer swipes a customer's card, the information goes to companies like CardSystems for approval before getting passed along to banks.
BUSINESS
April 6, 1993
American Express countersuesAmerican Express filed a countersuit accusing rival MasterCard International of false advertising, a reflection of the JTC intense competition in the corporate credit card market.The suit, filed yesterday, came in response to a March 8 complaint MasterCard brought in U.S. District Court in Manhattan. MasterCard charged American Express with unfair competition and false advertising.
TRAVEL
By Tom Parsons and Tom Parsons,McClatchy-Tribune | August 17, 2008
If you are looking for deals in the current travel climate, it is time to get creative. One of the ways you can save creatively is by considering two new airline affinity credit cards. For $139, travelers can earn enough miles on US Airways for a trip to Europe, Hawaii, the Caribbean or Mexico. You can earn these miles by signing up for both a US Airways Visa Signature card, with an annual fee of $90, and a US Airways World MasterCard, which has an annual fee of $49. The US Airways Visa Signature card offers 25,000 bonus miles after your first purchase.
NEWS
October 18, 2001
Blue Cow Cafe Where: 5134 Thunder Hill Road, Columbia; 410-772-8999. Hours: 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday; 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday; 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday. Prices: Sandwiches, $1 to $5.99; soups, $2.75 to $5.10; salads, $2.75 to $5.50; pastries, $1 to $2.99. Credit cards: Visa, MasterCard and Discover
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | March 30, 2012
MasterCard and Visa are warning banks nationwide of a massive breach at an unnamed U.S-based credit card processor, potentially involving as more than 10 million card numbers could be compromised, according to the blog, KrebsonSecurity . Blogger Brian Krebs says Visa and MasterCard started alerting banks to the problem late last week. So far, Krebs says, the compromised cards seemed to be concentrated in the New York City area. I will post more information from MasterCard and Visa when it comes in. Update 3: Response from MasterCard  "MasterCard is currently investigating a potential account data compromise event of a U.S.-based entity and, as a result,  we have alerted payment card issuers regarding certain MasterCard accounts that are potentially at risk.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay | May 18, 2011
If you encounter a sticky situation when you try to use your Visa or MasterCard at a store, there's another way to report a possible violation than just calling the toll-free customer service number.  I discovered MasterCard's online merchant violation forms via Consumerist , and it turns out Visa has one as well. For MasterCard's merchant violation form , you must choose from one of several options: either you were charged a fee to use your credit card, or required identification, or refused to accept a MasterCard even though they displayed a MasterCard logo.
TRAVEL
By Tom Parsons and Tom Parsons,McClatchy-Tribune | August 17, 2008
If you are looking for deals in the current travel climate, it is time to get creative. One of the ways you can save creatively is by considering two new airline affinity credit cards. For $139, travelers can earn enough miles on US Airways for a trip to Europe, Hawaii, the Caribbean or Mexico. You can earn these miles by signing up for both a US Airways Visa Signature card, with an annual fee of $90, and a US Airways World MasterCard, which has an annual fee of $49. The US Airways Visa Signature card offers 25,000 bonus miles after your first purchase.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 26, 2007
American consumers, uneasy about the economy and unimpressed by the merchandise in stores, delivered the bleak holiday shopping season retailers had expected, if not feared, according to one early but influential projection. Spending from Thanksgiving to Christmas rose just 3.6 percent over last year, the weakest performance in at least four years, according to MasterCard Advisors, a division of the credit card company. "There was not a recipe for a pickup in sales growth," said Michael McNamara, vice president for research and analysis at MasterCard Advisors, citing higher gas prices, a slowing housing market and a tight credit market.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | February 4, 2007
There's a lot riding on the outcome of today's Super Bowl for Indianapolis quarterback Peyton Manning. For one thing, he needs to prove that he can face the big one and not choke. (Actually, he seemed to finally prove that against New England in the AFC championship game two weeks ago. But, hey, there's a ring on the line today.) Manning also needs the win to stay on top as America's first-string shill for credit cards and potentially ruinous consumer debt. If everything goes his way -- and even if it doesn't -- Manning's star will continue to rise, and he'll make even more big money from MasterCard.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | May 26, 2006
NEW YORK -- Shares of MasterCard Inc., whose initial public offering raised less than its backers had hoped, soared 18 percent in the first day of trading. MasterCard surged $7 yesterday to close at $46 on the New York Stock Exchange. The world's No. 2 credit-card company raised $2.39 billion Wednesday in its IPO and priced its shares at $39 each, a dollar less than its minimum forecast. "We've seen some choppiness in the market in the last few weeks, and ultimately the market decides what a company is worth," Robert Selander, chief executive officer of MasterCard, said in an interview.
BUSINESS
By American Banker | September 9, 1992
NEW YORK -- Concerned about increases in fraud, the major bank-card associations are considering the mandatory use of personal identification numbers for credit-card purchases.The idea, long considered impractical with credit cards, was broached in a speech last week by Alex Hart, president of MasterCard International Inc."I think we are at great risk every passing month that we don't move forward to implement PINs," or personal identification numbers, Mr. Hart told members of the International Association of Credit Card Investigators.
BUSINESS
By Michael Quint and Michael Quint,New York Times News Service | December 3, 1991
Visa USA announced plans yesterday to change its membership rules to make it easier for companies other than banks, such as department stores, to issue Visa cards.Although Visa, the leading general-purpose credit card company, has not announced the specific rules governing such companies, it said that next week it would end a 13-month moratorium on accepting new members owned by companies that are not banks.The move by Visa makes it more competitive with Mastercard, which has been gaining market share because it has been more willing to allow non-banking companies to join its system.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | December 1, 2005
The problem with TV commercials is that they serve as a mirror of society, and sometimes what you see in the mirror ain't too pretty. Case in point: those clever MasterCard commercials starring Peyton Manning. Have you seen the new one yet? Here the star quarterback of the Indianapolis Colts reprises his role as a lunatic fan of ordinary people going about their everyday jobs. He fawningly asks a supermarket stock boy to autograph a melon, and gushes "Oh, man, that's awesome!" when the kid obliges.
NEWS
June 19, 2005
NATIONAL Bush addresses public qualmsWith his second-term priorities stalling and his approval ratings in the doldrums, President Bush is making new efforts to reassure the public about the war in Iraq and the health of the economy, hoping to reclaim the support he needs to re-energize his ambitious agenda. [Page 1a] MasterCard clarifies fraud risk MasterCard announced yesterday that about 68,000 credit card users were considered at high risk, after 13.9 million MasterCard accounts were exposed to possible fraud.
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