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NEWS
February 8, 2004
The Carroll County Master Gardeners invite the public to attend the guest speaker portion of their monthly general meetings. The one-hour lectures are held at 7:30 p.m. at Carroll Cooperative Extension, Smith Avenue in Westminster. The following lectures are planned: Four-Season Gardening on Feb. 18. Alan Summers of Carroll Gardens will give recommendations for year-round landscaping. Summers has been an avid gardener for 50 years and has learned to choose plants carefully. Houseplant Care: The Dos and Don'ts on March 10. Carrie Engel of Valley View Nursery will share information on how to best care for indoor plants.
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NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and For The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
Maintaining an environmentally friendly landscape at her family's home in Long Reach comes as second nature to Janine Pollack, who loves gardening and the outdoors. The pluses, some obvious and some not, are numerous. They include the inherent adaptability of native plants to the area's climate as well as their ability to attract insects, which attract birds, which attract wildlife. But the primary ecological benefit - which goes undetected by most visitors surveying the natural beauty of Pollack's outdoor canvas - is the ability of strategically placed landscaping to prevent polluted stormwater runoff from spoiling waterways and eventually fouling the Chesapeake Bay. Such benefits, and the principles behind them, will explained to visitors Sept.
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NEWS
September 28, 2008
Howard County Master Gardeners will sponsor two programs this month in the new woodland theater at the Whipps Garden Cemetery, 3651 St. Johns Lane, Ellicott City. Pat Ferensic will demonstrate using pumpkins and gourds in holiday arrangements at 1 p.m. Oct. 11, and Judy Petersen will discuss planting bulbs for year-round color in the landscape at 1 p.m. Oct. 18. Rain dates for the talks are Oct. 12 and Oct. 19, respectively. Refreshments will be served. Admission is free. The restored 19th-century cemetery, owned by the Friends of the Whipps Cemetery and Memorial Gardens Inc., is now a public garden-park.
NEWS
By Lane Page | April 29, 2014
It's been a couple of growing seasons since the Enchanted Garden at Howard County's Miller Branch Library has taken root, its trees and bushes branching, perennials spreading, annuals blossoming and edibles bursting with nutrients and flavor. Developed next to the children's area of the library, its total space may consist of a mere quarter-acre, but Oasis Design Group, Live Green Landscape Associates LLC and many volunteers have managed to tuck in some 65 varieties of woody and perennial plants plus varying annuals, benches for relaxation and contemplation, a pond, a stream and even a couple of sculptures.
NEWS
By JEAN LESLIE | May 24, 1993
In addition to books, the Miller Branch Library on Frederick Road is home to . . . gardeners?Every Saturday morning from 10 a.m. to noon, and Monday evening from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., the Master Gardeners of Howard County conduct a plant clinic.Take a sprig of your sick holly bush to them, and the Master Gardeners will diagnose and prescribe a plan to make it a healthy bush once again.There are now 21 new Master Gardeners who went through a 40-hour course and exam this spring given by University of Maryland's Cooperative Extension Service.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 18, 2002
CAROL SCHROEDER had a mystery to solve and headed to the Central Library on Saturday to find answers. Armed with samples taken from her yard, Schroeder enlisted the help of master gardeners Virginia Pausch and Peter Van Egmond, who were running a plant clinic at the library, to find solutions to her horticultural questions. From April through September, Maryland Cooperative Extension -- Howard County Master Gardeners offers plant clinics at four county libraries. Master gardeners must complete 40 hours of training to be certified and receive 10 hours of advanced training yearly.
NEWS
By Margaret E. Friedrich and Margaret E. Friedrich,Contributing writer | April 21, 1991
Walking up the brick path to master gardener Mary Strem's house nearEllicott City, guests just might be tempted to nibble on the landscape.Strawberry plants that line the walkway will soon burst with scrumptious red berries, and garlic and peppers will peep up between the flowers. What a Howard County Cooperative Extension Service mastergardener learns, she passes on.Strem earned her green thumb by pulling a lot of weeds over the years and by studying under the masters at the Extension Service Master Gardener Program, a project designed to lighten the work load at the extension office.
NEWS
By Kathy Curtis and Kathy Curtis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 24, 1997
WHEN PAULA Behm-Windle moved to River Hill last year, she had a new house on about a third of an acre. The site included an area of trees and scrub.But in terms of gardening and landscaping, "we started with nothing," Behm-Windle said.Like many new homeowners, she began devising plans for what to plant where.She had the scrub cleared out, put in paths and mulch, and planted some flowers.Susan Smith, River Hill's covenant adviser, then told Behm-Windle about the Bay-Wise Landscape Management Demonstration Program.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith and Jamie Smith,SUN STAFF | June 19, 1997
Mary Pinciotti knows that red clay is actually good for your garden, despite popular opinion. She can tell which bugs are the plant-killers and which are harmless. And if you're having problems with your petunias, she knows just what to do."Aphids are the most common problem on ornamental flowers [and] a spray of water is the best 'pesticide' you can use," said the Cockeysville resident, who has an unusual variety of the flower thriving on her patio.Pinciotti gives advice with confidence because she's unusual herself: One of 64 master gardeners in greater Baltimore, she can help just about anyone grow a green thumb.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and For The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
Maintaining an environmentally friendly landscape at her family's home in Long Reach comes as second nature to Janine Pollack, who loves gardening and the outdoors. The pluses, some obvious and some not, are numerous. They include the inherent adaptability of native plants to the area's climate as well as their ability to attract insects, which attract birds, which attract wildlife. But the primary ecological benefit - which goes undetected by most visitors surveying the natural beauty of Pollack's outdoor canvas - is the ability of strategically placed landscaping to prevent polluted stormwater runoff from spoiling waterways and eventually fouling the Chesapeake Bay. Such benefits, and the principles behind them, will explained to visitors Sept.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2013
Joy Umansky, chief baker at the Dorothea's Breads business she co-owned for a decade, died May 11 at Gilchrist Hospice Care of complications from a fractured hip. She was 85 and lived in Pikesville. Born Margaret Joy Ward-Walker in Birmingham, England, she was the daughter of Arthur Westfield Ward-Walker, a factory manager, and the former Margaret Vera Rabnit, who owned a pub. Like many British children, she was sent to the countryside during World War II to avoid German bombing raids.
NEWS
By Bess Keller | November 23, 2012
As the growing season winds down, one Baltimore City school garden has harvested next to nothing. A project intended to enliven lessons or inspire healthier eating came down to four neglected beds yielding two cinder-block-sized zucchini. The garden brings to mind an all-too-common twist on the line from the movie "Field of Dreams": If you build it, they won't necessarily come. School-community collaborations like this project have a lot to recommend them and are a favored vehicle for doing more with less at schools.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2012
The Carroll County Farmer's Market marked its 42nd anniversary Saturday with a bounty of seasonal fruits and vegetables, baked goods, fresh flowers, handmade crafts, even emu products. Because it was a party, customers were treated to punch and cake. The market, which opens from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays through Sept. 1, includes a cafeteria serving breakfast and lunch. Each week features a different demonstration, and Master Gardeners are always in attendance to offer advice on planting and growing problems.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2012
The new Miller library branch in Ellicott City will open its Enchanted Garden next weekend, an outdoor learning space that will be one of the few nationwide to be owned and tended by a public library. The space, which will offer classes and activities related to nutrition, environmental science and gardening, was named for the now-defunct Enchanted Forest amusement park on nearby U.S. 40. There will also be programs on meditation, acupuncture, insects and painting in the new space, said Rita Hamlet, the development specialist in charge of the quarter-acre garden.
EXPLORE
September 21, 2011
The Harford County Department of Public Works, in partnership with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, the University of Maryland – Master Gardeners and the Harford County Library, will be holding a rain garden workshop at Abingdon Library Saturday from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Registration is required. For more information, visit http://www.hcplonline.info or call 410-638-3990. The focus of the workshop will be how homeowners can create rain gardens in their own backyards.
EXPLORE
By Bob Allen | August 27, 2011
When the days grow short and the first frost sets in, there are certain things some people look back at with longing. Such as home-grown tomatoes. That's why the ninth annual Carroll County Master Gardeners' Heirloom Tomato Festival, held Aug. 20 at the Carroll County Agriculture Center, in Westminster, was seen by many attending as the perfect splashdown for celebrating the waning days of August and the splendor of home-grown, heirloom tomatoes. An heirloom tomato is considered to be a variety passed down through generations of a family.
NEWS
July 26, 2004
Therapy clinic welcomes new staff members Cypress Creek Therapy Associates has added new staff members at its Severna Park office. New physical therapists are Jeremy Gaynor and Rick Fortune. Monica Fish is the new hand therapist, and Beth Cook is new occupational therapist. New administration staff members include Lauren Carbo, vice president of administration; Shelia Bunkley, clinical administrator; and Blair McCarron, office manager. Cypress Creek Therapy Associates is the only outpatient clinic serving Anne Arundel County, offering physical, speech, occupational, aquatic, and massage therapy in one office.
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | September 30, 2010
I've always thought college was wasted on the young, and that I would be a much better student today than I was when beer and cute guys were competing for my attention. I always thought that my focus, honed to razor-sharpness by years of successful multitasking, would be stronger now, and so would my ability to remember something I wanted to know — instead of something someone else needed to remember to take to school the next day. Um … not so much. After years as a gardener, I am taking the Master Gardeners course offered by the University of Maryland Extension.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | April 8, 2010
Proposed cuts to Baltimore's budget would put the second season of the City Hall vegetable garden, which produced more than a ton of food for the homeless last year, in danger of an early frost. Cuts to the University of Maryland Extension Service in the city would likely eliminate the service altogether, and with it the Master Gardeners Program, which provided most of the labor and expertise during the garden's first year. Bill Vondrasek, chief horticulturist for the City Department of Parks and Recreation, which is in charge of city gardens, said he would still plant a vegetable garden around War Memorial Plaza, "but it probably wouldn't be done as well."
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