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By John H. Gormley Jr | October 31, 1990
Agreement was reached yesterday in Florida on a four-year master contract for longshoremen on the East and Gulf coasts.Maurice Byan, the chief negotiator for management in Baltimore, declined to provide details of the settlement but described the agreement as "beneficial for both sides."He said both sides have agreed not to reveal the contents of the agreement until representatives of management and the union membership have been informed.The major issues under discussion included the size of the gangs that load and unload containerships and the hours of work.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Longshoremen who went on strike last year at the port of Baltimore claim they are not liable for related losses sustained by their employers, in part because a coastwide labor contract banning such strikes does not apply to them. The claim was made in a federal court filing by Jennifer Stair, an attorney for the International Longshoremen's Association Local 333. The dockworkers union was sued last month by port employers for $3.86 million in damages — the amount arbitrator M. David Vaughn determined the employers lost during the union's three-day strike in October.
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BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | September 20, 1996
The head of Baltimore's largest longshoremen's local says dockworkers will likely approve a new five-year master contract -- including a controversial measure cutting the size of work gangs -- only if they can preserve the guaranteed annual income (GAI) fund.National leaders of the International Longshoremen's Association reached agreement earlier this week on an unprecedented five-year pact that includes a phased-in $4-an-hour wage increase, to $25 an hour.ILA locals and management in individual ports must still negotiate their local contracts, however.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
Shippers already have begun diverting cargo from the port of Baltimore because of uncertainty about the ongoing labor contract standoff with the largest dockworkers union. The port is losing shipments despite assurances from labor and management officials that there won't be another strike or a lockout when a 90-day cooling-off period expires Friday. But there was no sign of a deal late Thursday, with labor representatives pushing for negotiations to continue and management saying their final offer is already on the table.
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr | September 13, 1990
Negotiators representing dockworkers and their employers in East Coast ports broke off contract talks a day early yesterday, as the two sides apparently made little progress toward an agreement to replace the contract that expires Nov. 30.The master contract talks in Tampa, Fla., involve wage rates and work rules governing cargo moved in containers, metal boxes the size of truck trailers that are used to carry the most valuable kinds of goods, from shoes...
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr | November 8, 1990
Negotiations on a new contract for longshoremen in the port of Baltimore began in earnest yesterday, as management and union leaders voiced optimism that an agreement can be reached without a strike."
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writer | August 12, 1993
In a move that could ensure further stability for the port of Baltimore, the president of the International Longshoremen's Association said yesterday that the union would likely seek a one- or two-year extension to its contract rather than renegotiate."
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | September 18, 1996
Leaders of the International Longshoremen's Association and management representatives yesterday reached agreement on an unprecedented, five-year contract governing thousands of dockworkers from Maine to Texas.The package -- which goes to the ILA's rank and file for ratification on Oct. 2 -- includes a phased-in $4-an-hour wage increase to $25 an hour, a reduction in the mandatory size of gangs that load and unload containers and a cost-cutting health insurance plan.Details are expected to be announced today in New York, where the ILA and management leaders are meeting.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2014
Members of a local longshoremen union that went on strike in October, crippling the port of Baltimore for three days, will meet Monday to discuss a new contract offer from the port's employers. The deadline for a new deal between the International Longshoremen's Association Local 333 and the Steamship Trade Association of Baltimore, which represents the employers, is Jan. 17. That's when a "cooling-off" period ordered by an arbitrator to stop the October strike and restart port operations comes to an end. The outcome of the Local 333 meeting, where a vote on the proposed contract could take place, will have huge implications for the port - which has worked to protect its reputation as a dependable cargo handler after the last work stoppage angered customers.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer John Rivera contributed to this article | October 3, 1996
Angry Baltimore dockworkers last night overwhelmingly rejected a five-year contract, branding it as the worst agreement in more than a quarter of a century.The rejection sent leaders of the International Longshoremen's Association and port employers back to the bargaining table today, although work on the docks continued.By a 736-129 vote, Longshoremen yesterday torpedoed the proposed local contract that would have eliminated the Guaranteed Annual Income program and made sharp cuts in both the wages and gang size affecting break-bulk cargo.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2014
Members of a local longshoremen union that went on strike in October, crippling the port of Baltimore for three days, will meet Monday to discuss a new contract offer from the port's employers. The deadline for a new deal between the International Longshoremen's Association Local 333 and the Steamship Trade Association of Baltimore, which represents the employers, is Jan. 17. That's when a "cooling-off" period ordered by an arbitrator to stop the October strike and restart port operations comes to an end. The outcome of the Local 333 meeting, where a vote on the proposed contract could take place, will have huge implications for the port - which has worked to protect its reputation as a dependable cargo handler after the last work stoppage angered customers.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer John Rivera contributed to this article | October 3, 1996
Angry Baltimore dockworkers last night overwhelmingly rejected a five-year contract, branding it as the worst agreement in more than a quarter of a century.The rejection sent leaders of the International Longshoremen's Association and port employers back to the bargaining table today, although work on the docks continued.By a 736-129 vote, Longshoremen yesterday torpedoed the proposed local contract that would have eliminated the Guaranteed Annual Income program and made sharp cuts in both the wages and gang size affecting break-bulk cargo.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | September 20, 1996
The head of Baltimore's largest longshoremen's local says dockworkers will likely approve a new five-year master contract -- including a controversial measure cutting the size of work gangs -- only if they can preserve the guaranteed annual income (GAI) fund.National leaders of the International Longshoremen's Association reached agreement earlier this week on an unprecedented five-year pact that includes a phased-in $4-an-hour wage increase, to $25 an hour.ILA locals and management in individual ports must still negotiate their local contracts, however.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | September 18, 1996
Leaders of the International Longshoremen's Association and management representatives yesterday reached agreement on an unprecedented, five-year contract governing thousands of dockworkers from Maine to Texas.The package -- which goes to the ILA's rank and file for ratification on Oct. 2 -- includes a phased-in $4-an-hour wage increase to $25 an hour, a reduction in the mandatory size of gangs that load and unload containers and a cost-cutting health insurance plan.Details are expected to be announced today in New York, where the ILA and management leaders are meeting.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writer | September 25, 1993
Baltimore's 1,700 Longshoremen are expected to easily approve next week a two-year contract extension that should ensure continued stability at the once strife-ridden port.Under the extension, members of the International Longshoremen's Association nationwide would forgo a scheduled $1-an-hour wage increase, which would have raised their pay to $22 an hour. Instead, the money would go into local ILA pension and health benefit plans."We don't like giving up the dollar, but we're not giving it back since it will go directly in our benefits fund," said Ed Berke, president of ILA Local 333, which represents 1,100 cargo handlers and is the largest of the port's five Longshoremen locals.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writer | August 12, 1993
In a move that could ensure further stability for the port of Baltimore, the president of the International Longshoremen's Association said yesterday that the union would likely seek a one- or two-year extension to its contract rather than renegotiate."
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writer | September 25, 1993
Baltimore's 1,700 Longshoremen are expected to easily approve next week a two-year contract extension that should ensure continued stability at the once strife-ridden port.Under the extension, members of the International Longshoremen's Association nationwide would forgo a scheduled $1-an-hour wage increase, which would have raised their pay to $22 an hour. Instead, the money would go into local ILA pension and health benefit plans."We don't like giving up the dollar, but we're not giving it back since it will go directly in our benefits fund," said Ed Berke, president of ILA Local 333, which represents 1,100 cargo handlers and is the largest of the port's five Longshoremen locals.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
Shippers already have begun diverting cargo from the port of Baltimore because of uncertainty about the ongoing labor contract standoff with the largest dockworkers union. The port is losing shipments despite assurances from labor and management officials that there won't be another strike or a lockout when a 90-day cooling-off period expires Friday. But there was no sign of a deal late Thursday, with labor representatives pushing for negotiations to continue and management saying their final offer is already on the table.
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr | November 8, 1990
Negotiations on a new contract for longshoremen in the port of Baltimore began in earnest yesterday, as management and union leaders voiced optimism that an agreement can be reached without a strike."
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr | October 31, 1990
Agreement was reached yesterday in Florida on a four-year master contract for longshoremen on the East and Gulf coasts.Maurice Byan, the chief negotiator for management in Baltimore, declined to provide details of the settlement but described the agreement as "beneficial for both sides."He said both sides have agreed not to reveal the contents of the agreement until representatives of management and the union membership have been informed.The major issues under discussion included the size of the gangs that load and unload containerships and the hours of work.
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