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Mastectomy

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NEWS
July 2, 2000
Everybody's Quilt Guild of Carroll County recently donated more than 50 mastectomy pillows to The Women's Place at Carroll County General Hospital. The hand-quilted pillows are personalized with inspirational messages and will be used to comfort breast cancer patients who undergo mastectomies at the hospital. Nurses Cheri Fleagle and Alicia Schaeffer accepted the pillows from quilt guild members Diann Paarmann, Pamela Budesheim, Nancy Mosner, Nancy Ogletree, Millie Tracey and Mary Popp.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
When Mary Casterline was diagnosed with invasive carcinoma of the breast in mid-April, she knew she was fortunate. Her cancer was very treatable and she had a lot of options for both treatment and beyond. Casterline's doctors explained that she had the choice between radiation and lumpectomy (removing just the tumor but preserving the breast) or a mastectomy (complete removal of the breast). If she opted for mastectomy, she could choose to reconstruct the breast, either with an implant or via free tissue transfer (also known as "tissue flap" or "trans flap")
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 5, 1993
When Betsy Lambert, a New York lawyer, was told she had breast cancer two years ago, her surgeon advised her to have a lumpectomy, removing only the tumor from her breast, followed by six weeks of radiation treatment.But Ms. Lambert, terrified by the disease, sought two more opinions, one from another surgeon and another from a radiologist. Both urged her to have a mastectomy, removing the entire breast."I really agonized," she said. "It was a very, very scary time." In her heart, she said, she believed "a mastectomy is symbolic of the removal not just of the breast but of the disease."
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Some women at high risk for breast cancer because of an inherited gene mutation, including actress Angelina Jolie, are choosing to have preventive double mastectomies. Other women who have cancer in one breast are asking their doctors to remove the other breast removed out of caution. Whatever the reason, more women are having both breasts removed in response to cancer or a cancer threat. Dr. David Euhus, chief of breast surgery in the division of surgical oncology at Johns Hopkins Hospital, explains the trend and what happens after.
FEATURES
By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Contributing Writer | June 22, 1993
Several major scientific articles have indicated that for women with early stage breast cancer, a lumpectomy with radiotherapy offers the same rate of survival as a mastectomy for the surgical treatment of breast cancer.It is surprising then that most American women with breast cancer still have mastectomies. The reasons for this are puzzling to scientists and are clearly complicated, but it points up the need to educate women about these issues so that they can make informed choices. I talked with Dr. Nancy Davidson from the Johns Hopkins Oncology Center about the decisions women must make after they have been diagnosed as having breast cancer.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1996
Driven by insurance rules and new attitudes toward recovery, Maryland hospitals are limiting most mastectomy patients to an overnight stay or an outpatient routine that has women going home hours after surgery.A decade ago, women were hospitalized for up to a week after having a cancerous breast removed. It was a time for nurses to check drains and dressings, and for patients to begin recovering from an operation that can be painful and disfiguring.But in an era when hospitals do outpatient hernia repairs and discharge patients a day after gallbladder operations, they are preparing breast cancer patients to recover at home.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN REPORTER | May 16, 2008
In a stark reversal of a long-term trend, more early-stage breast cancer patients are choosing mastectomy, despite evidence that the aggressive, disfiguring surgery has the same survival rate as removing the malignant lump, new research shows. The study by doctors at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., suggests that a more detailed screening technique may have led additional women to have their breasts removed. But researchers also found a rise in mastectomies among women who weren't examined with the new magnetic resonance imaging technology.
HEALTH
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
When Mary Casterline was diagnosed with invasive carcinoma of the breast in mid-April, she knew she was fortunate. Her cancer was very treatable and she had a lot of options for both treatment and beyond. Casterline's doctors explained that she had the choice between radiation and lumpectomy (removing just the tumor but preserving the breast) or a mastectomy (complete removal of the breast). If she opted for mastectomy, she could choose to reconstruct the breast, either with an implant or via free tissue transfer (also known as "tissue flap" or "trans flap")
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | November 4, 1996
SAN FRANCISCO -- Venturing into the emotional minefield of gene testing for breast cancer, Kaiser Permanente researchers calculate that some "high-risk" women who test positive could cut their death rate by 90 percent -- if they have their breasts removed.The researchers emphasize that this possibility should only apply to women who undergo testing because they have a strong family history of breast cancer. Most women, however, do not.The calculation was part of guidelines for genetic testing that Kaiser presented Saturday at the annual meeting of the American Society for Human Genetics.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | May 15, 2013
"Mom. Do you have that gene? Do I? Have you been tested? I thought Grandma had breast cancer . Why weren't you ever tested?" The questions from my 27-year-old daughter were coming fast. Angelina Jolie published an essay in The New York Times on Tuesday, saying that she had had both breasts removed, and then reconstructed, after learning that she carried the mutated gene that can predispose women to breast and ovarian cancer. And Jessie was on the phone to me. Family history had moved the actress to get tested.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | May 15, 2013
"Mom. Do you have that gene? Do I? Have you been tested? I thought Grandma had breast cancer . Why weren't you ever tested?" The questions from my 27-year-old daughter were coming fast. Angelina Jolie published an essay in The New York Times on Tuesday, saying that she had had both breasts removed, and then reconstructed, after learning that she carried the mutated gene that can predispose women to breast and ovarian cancer. And Jessie was on the phone to me. Family history had moved the actress to get tested.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | May 15, 2013
Actress Angelina Jolie, who got a double mastectomy to lower her chances of breast cancer, will also have her ovaries removed, according to People magazine. Jolie said in a New York Times editorial Tuesday that she had her breasts removed and reconstructed because she has a gene mutation that makes her risk of breast cancer high. Women with the BRCA1 gene mutation also have a high chance of developing ovarian cancer. There is no test to detect ovarian cancer and women often die from the disease because it is diagnosed in the late stages.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2013
Actress Angelina Jolie's decision to have a double mastectomy rather than risk developing breast cancer hit close to home for Melissa DeSantis, a Bel Air mother of three children. As DeSantis read about Jolie's experience, she began to feel a sense of kinship to the Hollywood star. DeSantis also made the tough decision to have her breasts removed in a February surgery. Like Jolie, she had one of the inherited gene mutations that leaves many women more likely to develop cancer.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | September 26, 2012
How many children have you had, and did you wait until after 30 to have the first one? Do you have more than one drink a day? Did you get your period before you were 12? Do you exercise? Have a low-fat, high-fiber diet? Did you breast-feed? Do you work nights, wear a bra, have breast implants, use the Pill or wear antiperspirant? Do you smoke? Did your mother, your aunts or your sisters have breast cancer ? Do you have the breast cancer gene? Do you want to know if you have the breast cancer gene?
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | September 6, 2012
Judy Blume, the chronicler of youth angst in such books as " Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing" and "Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret," is writing now about a much more personal battle against breast cancer. In a blog post titled !@#$% Happens, Blume writes of a summer that began with plans for a trip to Italy and soon moved on to surgery. As you might expect, she blends plenty of  self-deprecating humor into her tale. She's healing now, a month after surgery, and looking forward to writing again.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow | michael.sragow@baltsun.com and Sun Movie Critic | March 21, 2010
The title of "Genius on the Edge: The Bizarre Double Life of Dr. William Stewart Halsted" suggests that Johns Hopkins' renowned first chief of surgery lived a hidden and unsavory existence in roughly the Jekyll-and-Hyde time frame. (Halsted was born in 1852, and died in 1922; Robert Louis Stevenson published his novel in 1886.) Actually, Dr. Gerald Imber's unpredictable and unflappable biography, an intrigue-filled life story that's also a sweeping pop medical history, depicts an individual who was two different kinds of good - make that, great - doctor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow | michael.sragow@baltsun.com and Sun Movie Critic | March 21, 2010
The title of "Genius on the Edge: The Bizarre Double Life of Dr. William Stewart Halsted" suggests that Johns Hopkins' renowned first chief of surgery lived a hidden and unsavory existence in roughly the Jekyll-and-Hyde time frame. (Halsted was born in 1852, and died in 1922; Robert Louis Stevenson published his novel in 1886.) Actually, Dr. Gerald Imber's unpredictable and unflappable biography, an intrigue-filled life story that's also a sweeping pop medical history, depicts an individual who was two different kinds of good - make that, great - doctor.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | March 22, 1995
A woman testified yesterday that the conduct of a surgeon caused her to develop multiple personalities and other problems, including flashbacks and nightmares relating to sexual abuse as a child.Linda Burt, 47, of Westminster is suing Drs. Donald D. Coker and John E. Steers on several counts, including malpractice, not obtaining her informed consent for treatment, and battery by Dr. Coker.The case is being heard before Carroll Circuit Judge Francis M. Arnold.Much of the suit focuses on Dr. Coker's conduct, but she claims that Dr. Steers should not have left her in Dr. Coker's care, and that Dr. Steers didn't respond adequately when she told him about her problems with Dr. Coker.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN REPORTER | May 16, 2008
In a stark reversal of a long-term trend, more early-stage breast cancer patients are choosing mastectomy, despite evidence that the aggressive, disfiguring surgery has the same survival rate as removing the malignant lump, new research shows. The study by doctors at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., suggests that a more detailed screening technique may have led additional women to have their breasts removed. But researchers also found a rise in mastectomies among women who weren't examined with the new magnetic resonance imaging technology.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 23, 2007
The number of women having both breasts removed after a tumor is found in one increased 150 percent during a five-year period despite a lack of evidence that double mastectomies increase survival in most women, researchers reported yesterday. Guidelines for treatment of a localized breast cancer call for removal of the tumor and not for a mastectomy, let alone a double mastectomy. But an increasing number of women, particularly young, white women, are pushing for the more aggressive procedure for reasons that are not totally clear, the researchers said.
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