Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMassie
IN THE NEWS

Massie

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 7, 2005
On August 4, 2005; THOMASINA MASSIE. On Monday, friends may call at the VAUGHN C. GREENE FUNERAL SERVICES, 4101 Edmondson Avenue, from 3 to 8 P.M. On Tuesday, Mrs. Massie will lie instate at New Psalmist Baptist Church, 4501 M-l old Frederick Road, where the family will receive friends from 10:30 to 11 A.M. with services to follow. Inquiries to 410-945-2700.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 21, 2009
On January 16, 2009, GRISCELDA; devoted mother of Aaron Massie; beloved daughter of Reatha Johnson. She is also survived by two sisters, Belvin Midgett and Mamie Hawkins; one brother, Sheldon Johnson and a hose of nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends. Friends may visit the Family Owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST, INC., 4300 Wabash Avenue, on Thursday after 8:30 A.M., where the family will receive friends from 5 to 7 P.M. The family will also receive friends on Friday at the Transformation Church of Jesus Christ, 5150 Baltimore National Pike at 10:30 A.M., followed by funeral service at 11 A.M.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 21, 2009
On January 16, 2009, GRISCELDA; devoted mother of Aaron Massie; beloved daughter of Reatha Johnson. She is also survived by two sisters, Belvin Midgett and Mamie Hawkins; one brother, Sheldon Johnson and a hose of nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends. Friends may visit the Family Owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST, INC., 4300 Wabash Avenue, on Thursday after 8:30 A.M., where the family will receive friends from 5 to 7 P.M. The family will also receive friends on Friday at the Transformation Church of Jesus Christ, 5150 Baltimore National Pike at 10:30 A.M., followed by funeral service at 11 A.M.
NEWS
August 7, 2005
On August 4, 2005; THOMASINA MASSIE. On Monday, friends may call at the VAUGHN C. GREENE FUNERAL SERVICES, 4101 Edmondson Avenue, from 3 to 8 P.M. On Tuesday, Mrs. Massie will lie instate at New Psalmist Baptist Church, 4501 M-l old Frederick Road, where the family will receive friends from 10:30 to 11 A.M. with services to follow. Inquiries to 410-945-2700.
NEWS
February 23, 2005
On January 4, 2005; RICHARD DYAS of Baltimore, MD; beloved son of Leda Massie of Cambridge, MA, and the late Jospeh Dyas Massie; devoted brother of Roberta Gurney, Rhonda Massie, and Robert Massie; also survived by seven nieces and nephews; dear friend of Wade Church, and Marva Hall. Memorial Mass in St. Ignatius Church, 740 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, on Friday, February 25 at 5:30 P.M. Please make donations to the St. Ignatius Memorial Restoration Fund.
NEWS
January 28, 2004
On January 26, 2004, LUNETTE A.V. MASSIE, loving aunt of Mabel Lyles, Mary Walker, Abraham, Marcellus, and Hampton Massie. Friends may call at the family owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST, INC., 4300 Wabash Avenue, on Thursday after 8 A.M., where family will receive friends from 5 to 7 P.M. Funeral services will be held on Saturday in Lexington, VA. See www.marchfh.com
NEWS
June 30, 1991
Ebony magazine recently recognized U.S. Naval Academy professor Samuel P. Massie as one of 11 black superstars of science.The Ebony article, in the June 1991 issue, is titled "Superstars of Science," and describes Massie as an educator who has inspired generations of blacks to enter the sciences.During his 25 years as a chemistry professor at the academy, Massie has been recognized numerous times for his achievements as an educator, researcher and public servant.In 1989, Massie was inducted into the National Black College Alumni Hall of Fame, which pays tribute to black achievers who have made the most of their educational andcareer opportunities.
NEWS
November 30, 1994
The legacy of Dr. Samuel P. Massie, who 32 years ago became the first black civilian professor at the Naval Academy, will continue at nine historically black colleges with the establishment of nine professorships in his name.The Dr. Samuel P. Massie Chair of Excellence Professorship in Environmental Disciplines, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and several Fortune 500 companies, will provide each of the schools, including Morgan State University in Baltimore, with a grant of $1.6 million over six years.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2005
Samuel P. Massie, the U.S. Naval Academy's first African-American faculty member, died of complications of dementia Sunday at Mariner Health Care of Greater Laurel. The Laurel resident was 85. By the time he joined the Naval Academy's faculty in 1966 as a professor of chemistry, Dr. Massie was a nationally recognized pioneer among black scientists and educators and he taught his students in Annapolis as much about life as he did about his subject. Born in North Little Rock, Ark., he graduated from high school at 13. He earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry from the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff, a master's degree from Fisk University in Nashville and a doctorate from Iowa State University, where he contributed to uranium studies related to atomic bomb research.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Staff Writer | December 15, 1993
Samuel P. Massie, the U.S. Naval Academy's first black professor, who taught students as much about life as he did about chemistry, is retiring.Dr. Massie, 74, taught chemistry at the academy for 28 years and was one of its most popular instructors. He will be honored by the academy at a dinner tonight at the Bay Ridge Inn in Annapolis."There probably is no right time to retire, but I wanted to go while I am still active to do things," Dr. Massie said. "I didn't want them dragging me out of here."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2005
Samuel P. Massie, the U.S. Naval Academy's first African-American faculty member, died of complications of dementia Sunday at Mariner Health Care of Greater Laurel. The Laurel resident was 85. By the time he joined the Naval Academy's faculty in 1966 as a professor of chemistry, Dr. Massie was a nationally recognized pioneer among black scientists and educators and he taught his students in Annapolis as much about life as he did about his subject. Born in North Little Rock, Ark., he graduated from high school at 13. He earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry from the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff, a master's degree from Fisk University in Nashville and a doctorate from Iowa State University, where he contributed to uranium studies related to atomic bomb research.
NEWS
February 23, 2005
On January 4, 2005; RICHARD DYAS of Baltimore, MD; beloved son of Leda Massie of Cambridge, MA, and the late Jospeh Dyas Massie; devoted brother of Roberta Gurney, Rhonda Massie, and Robert Massie; also survived by seven nieces and nephews; dear friend of Wade Church, and Marva Hall. Memorial Mass in St. Ignatius Church, 740 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, on Friday, February 25 at 5:30 P.M. Please make donations to the St. Ignatius Memorial Restoration Fund.
NEWS
January 28, 2004
On January 26, 2004, LUNETTE A.V. MASSIE, loving aunt of Mabel Lyles, Mary Walker, Abraham, Marcellus, and Hampton Massie. Friends may call at the family owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST, INC., 4300 Wabash Avenue, on Thursday after 8 A.M., where family will receive friends from 5 to 7 P.M. Funeral services will be held on Saturday in Lexington, VA. See www.marchfh.com
NEWS
February 17, 2000
BALTIMORE COUNTY schools' public confidence problem just went from bad to worse in the African-American community. School officials were already under fire for failing to make a priority of their efforts to close the staggering achievement gap between white and black students. Now they face a further loss of faith with the departure of deputy superintendent Elfreda W. Massie, the system's highest ranking African-American administrator. There's only one way to start rebuilding the community's trust: Place black achievement issues front and center.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2000
Baltimore County schools Deputy Superintendent Elfreda W. Massie has accepted a management position with an educational publishing company near Chicago, ending speculation that she might become the county's first African-American schools chief. According to sources in the school system and the community, Massie is expected to leave before June. She has not submitted a letter of resignation to the Board of Education, said board President Donald L. Arnold. "I'm sad to see her go if that is true," Arnold said.
NEWS
May 8, 1999
IMAGINE THE reaction if information about Elfreda Massie's financial problems had surfaced after she had accepted the position of Montgomery County school superintendent.Still, the county's Board of Education looks foolish because poorly handled background checks of its leading candidate failed to turn up a bankruptcy filing. Had the board been more open about the finalists for the job, information about Ms. Massie's financial affairs might have surfaced sooner.Maryland school boards often cite the personnel exemption in the state's open meetings law as justification for keeping the names of candidates secret.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff Writer | April 30, 1993
Naval Academy professor Samuel P. Massie may hav laughed and joked with the friends who came to honor him last night. But earlier in the day, he was apologizing for being "tense.""The event," he explained, "has really touched me. I'm kind of full."It was the first awards banquet for the Samuel P. Massie Educational Endowment, Inc., at Dahlgren Hall.The endowment, named for the first black professor at the Naval Academy is to provide scholarships to women, minorities and economically disadvantaged Anne Arundel County students studying math, science, engineering or health care in Maryland schools.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2000
Baltimore County schools Deputy Superintendent Elfreda W. Massie has accepted a management position with an educational publishing company near Chicago, ending speculation that she might become the county's first African-American schools chief. According to sources in the school system and the community, Massie is expected to leave before June. She has not submitted a letter of resignation to the Board of Education, said board President Donald L. Arnold. "I'm sad to see her go if that is true," Arnold said.
NEWS
May 7, 1999
BANKRUPTCY, like divorce, has become commonplace in American society. Just as failed marriages no longer carry a social stigma, personal bankruptcy no longer is an impediment to obtaining credit in the future. But as Baltimore County Deputy School Superintendent Elfreda W. Massie learned, declaring bankruptcy can hurt.Ms. Massie, who was set to become Montgomery County school superintendent, and her husband filed personal bankruptcy last June. They declared $866,799 in debts they could not service in a timely fashion.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Candus Thomson and Jackie Powder and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | May 6, 1999
In the face of rising controversy over her personal financial problems, Baltimore County's deputy school superintendent, Elfreda W. Massie, dropped out of contention yesterday to head the Montgomery County school district.Massie was the leading contender for the superintendent's job until Montgomery County's school board learned this week that she and her husband were seeking bankruptcy protection from more than $800,000 in debts.The discovery prompted the board to suspend her candidacy while it investigated the matter.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.