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NEWS
By Elise Armacost and Elise Armacost,Staff writer | September 3, 1991
Local massage therapists, struggling to be recognized as professionals, are throwing support behind County Councilman George Bachman's bill to stamp out controversial massage parlors.The nine-page bill,to be introduced at tonight's council meeting, was spawned by controversy over two North County massage parlors, where police saw female masseuses manually stimulating male clients. That activity is not covered under solicitation laws, so police could not take action.Though both massage parlors have been closed for zoning violations, the Democratic councilman from Linthicum is worried that other massage operators will take advantage of the loophole in the solicitation law.Bachman's bill would require massage establishments, managers and technicians that fall under the proposed legislation to be licensed by the Department of Inspections and Permits.
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TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2011
Bring your karma and your chameleon to the KarmaFest this weekend at Oregon Ridge Park in Cockeysville. In its sixth year, the festival is the work of Patricia Hawse, a Red Cross volunteer who found solace in meditation during her time in Louisiana, where she helped victims of Hurricane Katrina. Afterwards, Hawse vowed to spread the word about the benefits of yoga, meditation, holistic medicine and the power of the pysche. Whether you're a master of the downward-facing dog or simply a poseur, it doesn't matter because by the end of the week we could all use some good karma.
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NEWS
October 9, 1997
PEOPLE MOVED out to the suburbs, then shopping malls followed, then warehouse stores. It was only a matter of time before the suburbs got houses of prostitution fronting as massage parlors. Businesses follow people, so it should be no surprise that suburban communities have had to grapple with the sex trade. Alas, that hasn't made the trend easier to accept.Anne Arundel and Prince George's counties have passed laws designed to drive away those unsavory businesses. To eliminate the illegal sex play, they made it a crime for anyone other than certified massage therapists to rub down members of the opposite sex.The impact of the measures, passed in recent years, was instant.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones Bonbrest and Nancy Jones Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2009
Salary: $60,000 Age: 52 Years on the job: 1.5 years How she got started: Jean Wible graduated with a degree in nursing from Marywood University in Pennsylvania. She worked as a nurse for more than 20 years, specializing in geriatric nursing and hospice care. In 1997 she became certified in massage therapy and built a private practice as a massage therapist while working part time as a nurse. The combination worked well, Wible said. "I was looking to balance things out. I wanted to move toward health and wellness instead of death and illness.
NEWS
By ED HEARD and ED HEARD,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1995
Howard County police were serving arrest warrants last night for 16 massage parlor employees, culminating a seven-month investigation during which officers witnessed them allegedly engaged in sexual acts at the six county-licensed parlors.Those named in the warrants were the first to be charged under a tough massage parlor law enacted last year by the County Council to prevent prostitution.During the investigation, police detectives posed as customers and observed the massage therapists touching customers to sexually stimulate them, police said.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | December 28, 1998
Baltimore County is hoping to resolve a problem that has been studied by state officials for the past year: What is a massage therapist?County officials are planning to spell out certification requirements for legitimate therapists to distinguish them from the tawdry, adult-oriented massage parlors that over the years have been the focus of community complaints, tightened zoning regulations and police crackdowns.Officials say the regulations are needed because zoning codes effective March 20 will restrict massage parlors to heavy manufacturing districts.
FEATURES
By Heather Byer and Heather Byer,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 3, 1997
They traipse off planes every day at BWI: tense, harried business people, lugging briefcases and laptops, shoulders hunched after crouching over memos and files on a cramped flight. But rather than heading for the nearest airport bar, or nodding off in front of the cable feature in their hotel room, increasing numbers of these weary travelers are making a beeline for a massage table.They visit massage therapists such as Chris Lepper, who operates Serenity Point, one of several independent massage practices based at the BWI Massage Therapy Center, in the Marriott Hotel next to the airport.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1997
With names like "A Fantasy for You" and "Venus and Mars," Baltimore County's illegal massage parlors are easy for police to spot -- especially when they publish their locations in local newspaper ads.But shutting them down is another matter. Frustrated police and prosecutors have launched an aggressive campaign against the PTC operations, which close and reopen so quickly that police can't tell how many there are.Since June, police have made 28 arrests and obtained four search warrants involving illegal parlors, which they say are the sites of prostitution, robberies and other criminal activity.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones Bonbrest and Nancy Jones Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2009
Salary: $60,000 Age: 52 Years on the job: 1.5 years How she got started: Jean Wible graduated with a degree in nursing from Marywood University in Pennsylvania. She worked as a nurse for more than 20 years, specializing in geriatric nursing and hospice care. In 1997 she became certified in massage therapy and built a private practice as a massage therapist while working part time as a nurse. The combination worked well, Wible said. "I was looking to balance things out. I wanted to move toward health and wellness instead of death and illness.
NEWS
By Pat Gilbert and Pat Gilbert,Sun Staff Writer | October 4, 1994
After approving several amendments, the Baltimore County Council last night approved a bill regulating massage parlors.The vote on the administration bill was 5-1.The dissenting vote was cast by Towson Republican Douglas B. Riley, who raised concerns about the constitutionality of allowing police to enter massage parlors without warrants and invading the privacy of customers."
NEWS
By MATTHEW DOLAN and MATTHEW DOLAN,SUN REPORTER | April 25, 2006
A former state investigator of the massage parlor industry has been charged with extortion, according to a two-count federal indictment unsealed yesterday. Paul E. Murphy, 55, of Bel Air was arrested by the FBI on Friday. Later that day, Murphy made an initial appearance in U.S. District Court in Baltimore. No date for his arraignment has been set, said his attorney, Gerald C. Ruter. The FBI and the U.S. attorney's office declined to provide details about the extortion allegations lodged against Murphy.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | May 9, 2004
I had a shiatsu massage and it really energized me. I know shiatsu is based on stimulating the body's meridians. What exactly are the meridians and how else can I stimulate them? The body's meridians, or energy pathways, are also stimulated in acupuncture and acupressure sessions (shiatsu massage incorporates elements of acupressure). The theory is that the energy flow along these meridians, which is sometimes disrupted, can be restored by stimulating certain points. This steady flow of chi is said to keep the body in balance.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2002
Gina Fortunato spent an hour yesterday breathing in deeply and letting go, an exercise in relaxation, self-transformation, inspiration. Oh, and fund raising. Appreciating the idea of doing good while helping themselves, dozens of people arrived for yoga classes, massage appointments and "integrative breathing" sessions at seven sites throughout the Baltimore area for the HealingAthon, a new charity event. The money participants paid for their moments of me-time will fund similar services for cancer patients, organizers said.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 17, 2001
Acupuncturists, aromatherapists, pharmacists, chiropractors and yoga teachers will appear Thursday at the Alternative Medicine/Pain Management Expo at the Maryland State Fairgrounds in Timonium. The daylong expo, the first of its kind to be sponsored by the Baltimore County Department of Aging, is designed to teach the benefits and dangers of alternative medicines. "People are mixing herbal therapies with prescription drugs without knowing the side effects," said Arnold J. Eppel, the department's deputy director.
NEWS
By From staff reports | December 18, 2000
In Baltimore County Applicants sought to fill vacancies in Circuit Court TOWSON - Lawyers interested in filling two vacancies on the Baltimore County District Court bench have until Jan. 16 to complete a questionnaire available from state court officials in Annapolis. Applicants for the posts will be interviewed by the Baltimore County Judicial Nominating Commission, a group of lawyers and others that recommends a list of candidates to Gov. Parris N. Glendening. Salary for the positions is $103,000.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | December 28, 1998
Baltimore County is hoping to resolve a problem that has been studied by state officials for the past year: What is a massage therapist?County officials are planning to spell out certification requirements for legitimate therapists to distinguish them from the tawdry, adult-oriented massage parlors that over the years have been the focus of community complaints, tightened zoning regulations and police crackdowns.Officials say the regulations are needed because zoning codes effective March 20 will restrict massage parlors to heavy manufacturing districts.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 17, 2001
Acupuncturists, aromatherapists, pharmacists, chiropractors and yoga teachers will appear Thursday at the Alternative Medicine/Pain Management Expo at the Maryland State Fairgrounds in Timonium. The daylong expo, the first of its kind to be sponsored by the Baltimore County Department of Aging, is designed to teach the benefits and dangers of alternative medicines. "People are mixing herbal therapies with prescription drugs without knowing the side effects," said Arnold J. Eppel, the department's deputy director.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1997
With names like "A Fantasy for You" and "Venus and Mars," Baltimore County's illegal massage parlors are easy for police to spot -- especially when they publish their locations in local newspaper ads.But shutting them down is another matter.Frustrated police and prosecutors have launched an aggressive campaign against the operations, which close and reopen so quickly that police can't tell how many there are.Since June, police have made 28 arrests and obtained four search warrants involving illegal parlors, which they say are the sites of prostitution, robberies and other criminal activity.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | December 8, 1998
Dressed in a beige blouse buttoned to her throat and a long brown skirt, Deborah Anne Yazdoni appeared before a Baltimore County zoning commissioner yesterday seeking permission to operate a therapeutic massage office in her Park Heights Avenue home.She explained that she wants to see only a few clients a week and her lawyer presented copies of her diplomas and certificates.A Baltimore County vice squad detective had some evidence of his own: Yazdoni's business card that showed her wearing a string bikini and a snapshot taken as she was caught, wearing only panties and a bra, giving an undercover police officer a massage.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | June 8, 1998
His hands float a few inches above her torso as she rests serenely in a softly lighted room.This body energy treatment, plus a raw food diet and hypnotherapy, are helping her feel so much better that in December she stopped chemotherapy and transfusions for a recurrence of Hodgkin's disease -- yet her blood work is stable enough that her oncologist has postponed another CAT scan until summer's end, she says.She came here, to a Severna Park shopping center, because she says the treatments helped her uncle and because she wanted something more than doctoring.
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