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Dan Rodricks | December 14, 2012
Look at what has become national ritual: A horrific shooting in some otherwise ordinary corner of the country - this time a town in Connecticut - with many dead and wounded, shock and grief, wall-to-wall television coverage. The president and the governor ask us to pray for the victims and their families. A police chief, suddenly and reluctantly a celebrity, provides details of the killings, including the make and model of the weapons. We're told to refrain from politicizing tragedy in its immediate aftermath - that's part of the ritual, too. More grieving, more stories and magazine covers, a week of funerals.
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NEWS
July 14, 2014
President Barack Obama has stated that for the U.S. to extend a helping hand to Iraq he must see "tangible commitments from Iraq's leaders to pursue more inclusive government agenda" ("50 bodies found in Iraq in massacre resurgence," July 10). Despite many setbacks, Iraqi Prime Minster Nouri al-Maliki announced that the army has gained the upper hand against militants of the ISIS, and I hope to see Iraq eventually become a state, self-sufficient county and the first democracy in the Arab Middle East.
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NEWS
July 29, 2012
Katie Medley is in the hospital, having joyously given birth to her first child, baby Hugo, while one floor away the new father, Caleb Medley, lies in an induced coma after being blasted by the heavily armed gunman who attacked a crowded theater in Aurora, Colo., last week. While the shooter was stockpiling guns and ammunition, the Republican party and Maryland Rep. Andy Harris were right there fighting any attempt to limit his ability to buy thousands of rounds of ammo along with oversize magazines for his semiautomatic weapon.
NEWS
By David Horsey | April 15, 2014
In response to this month's mass shooting at Fort Hood, Speaker of the House John Boehner said mentally disturbed people should not be allowed to get their hands on firearms. But don't hold your breath waiting for legislation to emerge from Congress to keep that from happening. "There's no question that those with mental health issues should be prevented from owning weapons or being able to purchase weapons. " That is what Boehner said. Yet, last year, when a bipartisan bill to set up a system of background checks for gun purchases was put forward, Mr. Boehner showed no enthusiasm for bringing it up for a vote in the House.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Sun Staff Correspondent | March 12, 1995
NANJING, China -- The shooting for the movie begins each day at 7 a.m., but by 6:30 a.m. people are already crowding the fences around the Zhonghuamen, the largest of Nanjing's medieval gates.The young people come to catch a glimpse of the --ing actor who plays the leading role. But the older ones are here to glimpse a rare airing of their history, the re-creation of an event of nearly 60 years ago, one so colored by politics and national pride that it is usually shrouded from view.The subject of the movie is known in the West as the Rape of Nanjing, a six-week massacre that began Dec. 13, 1937, when Japan's Imperial Army slid into barbarism.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 13, 1994
TAIPEI, Taiwan -- In a city dominated by a huge memorial to dictator Chiang Kai-shek, another symbol of this island's troubled past is nearing completion: a memorial to Chiang's victims, designed by a man who tried to assassinate Chiang's son.Such a turn of events would have been unimaginable a few years ago. The 1947 massacre of up to 20,000 indigenous Taiwanese here was a taboo subject. Perhaps even more than Taiwan's blooming democracy or its phenomenal economic wealth, the story of the "228" memorial and the failed assassin Cheng Tzu-tsai illustrates the rapid-fire changes taking place on this small island of 21 million off the coast of China.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 20, 1999
WASHINGTON -- In the wake of the massacre of 45 ethnic Albanians in Kosovo province, NATO's military commander met yesterday with Serbian leader Slobodan Milosevic, offering a "blunt message" about Serbian aggression and holding out the possibility of launching allied airstrikes."
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman and Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 21, 1999
WASHINGTON -- NATO took early steps yesterday toward launching military attacks against Yugoslavia after two top alliance generals got nowhere in calling on President Slobodan Milosevic to account for last week's massacre of ethnic Albanians in Kosovo.Officials said several diplomatic steps lay ahead before the alliance would begin air strikes, but the U.S. envoy to NATO, Alexander Vershbow, said the alliance is "on the brink" of action.Asked on a British Broadcasting Corp. program whether Milosevic has a few days to maneuver, Vershbow replied, "I wouldn't guarantee that he has even that long."
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | September 24, 1990
Outside the auditorium, it was a typical late summer evening at Anne Arundel Community College. A young couple sat under a tree, holding hands and sharing a Coke, while other students dressed in jeans and sweat shirts strolled purposefully toward the library.But the serenity was shattered inside the modern auditorium. Rows of armed soldiers stood silhouetted in the glare of spotlights, gunshots rang out and scores of student protesters dropped bleeding to the ground.With these graphic descriptions, David Aikman, a 46-year-old foreign correspondent for "Time" magazine, transformed the dimly lighted room into a huge square in China filled with students demonstrating for democracy.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Staff Writer The New York Times contributed to this article | June 20, 1992
BOIPATONG, South Africa -- A large contingent of white policemen stood by at the KwaMadala hostel yesterday, across the highway from this township of modest houses and little shacks where 39 people were massacred this week.The survivors of the massacre Wednesday night say that Zulu tribesmen from the hostel committed the massacre. Many residents suspect police of complicity in the attack and say that police vans were used to protect the attackers rather than the residents, who were murdered in their own homes by a gang of 200 men wielding knives, guns, axes and spears.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
A graduate of Johns Hopkins University's international studies school, eight months pregnant, was among dozens killed in the weekend massacre at a Kenyan shopping mall. Elif Yavuz, 33, who earned her graduate degree from the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies in 2004, was killed along with her husband, architect Ross Langdon, according to media reports. Gunmen stormed the Westgate Mall in Nairobi on Saturday, and were still locked in a standoff with Kenyan forces by Monday.
NEWS
January 3, 2013
After the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School, what's needed is more gun control, according to columnist Dan Rodricks ("The massacre this time," Dec. 15). Yet a story in the same edition described a man in China who used a knife to attack some 20 children. The problem is not the weapon, but the troubled young men who wield them. It is a daunting, if not impossible task for psychiatrists, psychologists and others to take the first step in situations where even parents are frustrated and helpless in dealing with a troubled child.
NEWS
By Gordon Livingston | December 26, 2012
In the aftermath of the Newtown massacre, people continue to ask the useless question, "Why?" We search for the shooter's "motive," as if we could discover a satisfactory explanation for why a depressed young man would decide to execute his mother, 20 first-graders and six of their teachers. Why did this latest alienated loner in our pantheon of mass murderers grab the stockpile of weapons his suburban mother had accumulated? How could people not have known? Was this a "failure of the mental health system?"
NEWS
December 21, 2012
After a week of silence following the massacre in Newtown, Conn., the National Rifle Association went on the attack Friday morning, insisting that mass killings are the fault of the media, politicians who pass laws banning firearms from schools, the government's refusal to assemble a database of the mentally ill, the president for eliminating funding for some school safety grants - the fault, in other words, of everybody but the NRA, and the fault of...
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | December 14, 2012
Look at what has become national ritual: A horrific shooting in some otherwise ordinary corner of the country - this time a town in Connecticut - with many dead and wounded, shock and grief, wall-to-wall television coverage. The president and the governor ask us to pray for the victims and their families. A police chief, suddenly and reluctantly a celebrity, provides details of the killings, including the make and model of the weapons. We're told to refrain from politicizing tragedy in its immediate aftermath - that's part of the ritual, too. More grieving, more stories and magazine covers, a week of funerals.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2012
I told myself I wasn't going to go here -- I wasn't going to weigh in on the pasting Matt Lauer was taking on Twitter Thursday and Friday for his less-than-stellar performance as TV host for NBC's coverage of the Macy's Thanksgiving Day parade. But where there is vitriol like this, there is definitely something deeper happening -- something worth thinking about. Actually, I think there are several things going on. I wouldn't call it a perfect storm, but there are some ill cultural winds blowing Lauer's way -- and it could mean some rough weather ahead for him and the "Today" show in the battle with ABC's "Good Morning America.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | November 18, 1997
Through three generations, the tale was passed down. From father to daughter, to daughter again.Of how Japanese soldiers plundered the city of Nanking in December 1937, killing and torturing more than 300,000 people in less than eight weeks.Of how they stormed the streets, killing for sport, slashing people into pieces, raping thousands of women and young girls and then mutilating their bodies.Of how the Yangtze River that snakes past the city literally ran red with blood.And now, 29-year-old Iris Chang has woven her grandfather's tales of the Nanking massacre into the first English-language book on the topic: "The Rape of Nanking: The Forgotten Holocaust of World War II."
NEWS
July 29, 2012
Katie Medley is in the hospital, having joyously given birth to her first child, baby Hugo, while one floor away the new father, Caleb Medley, lies in an induced coma after being blasted by the heavily armed gunman who attacked a crowded theater in Aurora, Colo., last week. While the shooter was stockpiling guns and ammunition, the Republican party and Maryland Rep. Andy Harris were right there fighting any attempt to limit his ability to buy thousands of rounds of ammo along with oversize magazines for his semiautomatic weapon.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2012
Bonnie Branch Middle School eighth-graders Nick Kundrat and Matt Yagel point to a bar graph made for their school project examining security at the 1972 Summer Olympic Games in Munich, Germany, which ended with 11 athletes killed. The graph illustrates the amount of money spent on security for the 2004 Summer Games in Athens ($600 million) with a large vertical rectangle. The amount of security spent on the Munich Games ($2 million) is represented with a hairline sliver. "You can barely see the line for the Munich Olympics," said Matt, 14, who along with Nick crafted the project, "The Munich Massacre: Revolution of the Games.
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