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By Mark Weisbrot | June 23, 2000
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court's unanimous decision to strike down the Massachusetts Burma law says more about the pro-business bias of the present court than it does about the legal principles involved in the case. The Massachusetts selective purchasing law made it hard for companies that do business in Burma to win contracts from the state. It is difficult to see what is wrong with that. After all, our law respects the concept of consumer sovereignty: as individuals, we are free to vote with our dollars and refuse to buy anything from any company that we dislike.
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NEWS
July 9, 2014
Jenny Black, the president and CEO of Planned Parenthood of Maryland, has condemned the Supreme Court's Hobby Lobby decision and another case striking down a Massachusetts law barring protesters from coming within 30 feet of an abortion clinic ( "In 2014, why are women still struggling to get basic health care?" July 2). Yet both rulings are small steps in the recognition and restoration of the inalienable rights of religious freedom and peaceful protest. Neither decision extends rights nor abrogates the rights of others.
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NEWS
July 1, 2014
Marylanders seeking health care will still be protected from illegal conduct when they enter a health care facility even though the Massachusetts Reproductive Health Care Facilities Act was found unconstitutional by the Supreme Court last week. Our law prohibits conduct with the intent to prevent an individual from entering or exiting a medical facility by physically "detaining the individual or obstructing, impeding, or hindering the individual's passage. " This legislation, enacted in 1989, is not limited to reproductive health care facilities as was the Massachusetts law, and it explicitly excludes speech from the actions that are illegal.
NEWS
July 1, 2014
Marylanders seeking health care will still be protected from illegal conduct when they enter a health care facility even though the Massachusetts Reproductive Health Care Facilities Act was found unconstitutional by the Supreme Court last week. Our law prohibits conduct with the intent to prevent an individual from entering or exiting a medical facility by physically "detaining the individual or obstructing, impeding, or hindering the individual's passage. " This legislation, enacted in 1989, is not limited to reproductive health care facilities as was the Massachusetts law, and it explicitly excludes speech from the actions that are illegal.
NEWS
July 9, 2014
Jenny Black, the president and CEO of Planned Parenthood of Maryland, has condemned the Supreme Court's Hobby Lobby decision and another case striking down a Massachusetts law barring protesters from coming within 30 feet of an abortion clinic ( "In 2014, why are women still struggling to get basic health care?" July 2). Yet both rulings are small steps in the recognition and restoration of the inalienable rights of religious freedom and peaceful protest. Neither decision extends rights nor abrogates the rights of others.
NEWS
By Jonathan Schanzer and Howard Slugh | July 26, 2007
Last month, Florida Gov. Charlie Crist signed a bill ordering his state to divest its pension fund from businesses that work with Iran's energy sector. The legislation, led by Adam Hasner, Republican majority leader of Florida's House of Representatives, passed unanimously in both chambers of the Legislature. Unfortunately, the state legislation is unconstitutional. Only new federal legislation can legally allow states to divest from Iran. In 1996, Massachusetts restricted state businesses from working with companies that dealt with Myanmar, formerly called Burma.
BUSINESS
By M. WILLIAM SALGANIK and M. WILLIAM SALGANIK,SUN REPORTER | April 20, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Massachusetts' groundbreaking legislation to make health insurance universally available may not work as a direct model for other states, but it does demonstrate that a melding of conservative and "progressive" ideas can bring political consensus, according to key players involved in designing the plan. The Bay State has some big pluses - namely fewer uninsured than other states and an available source of funding. But the law, which takes effect next year, could usher in broader effort by the states to tackle a problem that has evaded a national solution.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | January 26, 2011
Maryland lawmakers are again considering legislation to bar gifts from companies to health care providers in the wake of allegations that a Towson cardiologist was "indirectly influenced" to perform unnecessary stent procedures by device maker Abbott Laboratories. Vermont and Massachusetts have recently enacted similar laws, considered the most restrictive in the nation, that significantly limit the items sales representatives can offer to physicians, prohibiting trinkets, trips and most meals.
NEWS
October 1, 2006
QUOTE OF THE DAY A lot of the people who practice paganism aren't terribly public about it. We jokingly say they're in the broom closet." Sherry Marts, Open Hearth Foundation board member Article, PG 3B Up next Monday Rock class The Baltimore School of Rock tries to turn wannabe musicians into budding rock stars. IN TODAY Wednesday Coffee hour At Dukem Restaurant, 50 to 60 people show up each Sunday afternoon for an aromatic, Old World ritual: the Ethiopian coffee ceremony. IN TASTE Friday Gangsters The Departed, a film by Martin Scorsese, tells the story of two moles within Massachusetts law enforcement and the Irish mafia.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | January 5, 1992
BOSTON -- Secretary of State Michael J. Connolly has reversed his December decision to exclude former Ku Klux Klansman David Duke from the Massachusetts Republican presidential primary ballot.Mr. Connolly said that the threat of a lawsuit from the American Civil Liberties Union left him no choice but to award Mr. Duke a ballot spot."As much as I find this distasteful . . . given the legal maneuverings that have gone on, he will have a place on the ballot," Mr. Connolly said Friday.Marc Ellis, a spokesman for Mr. Duke's campaign, said that as a result, Mr. Duke would come to Massachusetts in February to campaign.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | January 26, 2011
Maryland lawmakers are again considering legislation to bar gifts from companies to health care providers in the wake of allegations that a Towson cardiologist was "indirectly influenced" to perform unnecessary stent procedures by device maker Abbott Laboratories. Vermont and Massachusetts have recently enacted similar laws, considered the most restrictive in the nation, that significantly limit the items sales representatives can offer to physicians, prohibiting trinkets, trips and most meals.
NEWS
By Jonathan Schanzer and Howard Slugh | July 26, 2007
Last month, Florida Gov. Charlie Crist signed a bill ordering his state to divest its pension fund from businesses that work with Iran's energy sector. The legislation, led by Adam Hasner, Republican majority leader of Florida's House of Representatives, passed unanimously in both chambers of the Legislature. Unfortunately, the state legislation is unconstitutional. Only new federal legislation can legally allow states to divest from Iran. In 1996, Massachusetts restricted state businesses from working with companies that dealt with Myanmar, formerly called Burma.
BUSINESS
By M. WILLIAM SALGANIK and M. WILLIAM SALGANIK,SUN REPORTER | April 20, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Massachusetts' groundbreaking legislation to make health insurance universally available may not work as a direct model for other states, but it does demonstrate that a melding of conservative and "progressive" ideas can bring political consensus, according to key players involved in designing the plan. The Bay State has some big pluses - namely fewer uninsured than other states and an available source of funding. But the law, which takes effect next year, could usher in broader effort by the states to tackle a problem that has evaded a national solution.
NEWS
By Mark Weisbrot | June 23, 2000
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court's unanimous decision to strike down the Massachusetts Burma law says more about the pro-business bias of the present court than it does about the legal principles involved in the case. The Massachusetts selective purchasing law made it hard for companies that do business in Burma to win contracts from the state. It is difficult to see what is wrong with that. After all, our law respects the concept of consumer sovereignty: as individuals, we are free to vote with our dollars and refuse to buy anything from any company that we dislike.
BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 20, 2000
WASHINGTON - A unanimous Supreme Court sharply restricted the authority of state and local governments yesterday to use their purchasing power to try to influence the human rights policies of foreign nations. The court struck down a 1996 Massachusetts law aimed at promoting democracy in Burma, saying it intruded heavily on the power of the president to conduct foreign policy. The state law, affecting about $2 billion a year of purchases by state agencies, barred those agencies from buying goods or services from companies - American or overseas - that do business with or in Burma.
NEWS
September 19, 1993
Before Katherine Ann Power can really come to terms with her past as an anti-Vietnam War revolutionary, she should come to terms with the suffering of her victims. And there were many: A policeman slain in a 1970 Boston bank robbery as she drove the getaway car. A widow forced to live in a housing project. Nine children who had to grow up without a father. All the many relatives in an extended family with a law enforcement tradition who had to watch anti-war campus activists issue pamphlets exulting: "Pig is dead."
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