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By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 27, 1997
RANCHO SANTA FE, Calif. -- Police found the bodies of 39 young men, apparently cult members who believed they were sent to earth as angels, lying dead on their backs yesterday in a luxurious home -- victims of what authorities were calling a mass suicide.The cult they belonged to, called W.W. Higher Source, practiced celibacy and abstained from smoking and drinking, according to Milt Silverman Jr., an attorney for the owner of the home where the men died. They were apparently celebrating a "holy week" when they died, Silverman said.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 12, 2003
NEW YORK - Hector Berlioz was the Orson Welles of classical music - a certifiable genius, intriguingly eccentric, passionate, obstinate, way ahead of his time. Just as few people initially recognized the breadth of Welles' talent when it was first manifested in Citizen Kane, few understood the intense originality of Berlioz's first masterpiece, Symphonie fantastique. The analogy can be drawn out a little more. Consider the way Welles stretched himself even further with The Magnificent Ambersons but had a huge amount of his vision thrown onto the cutting room floor by insensitive producers.
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NEWS
March 28, 1997
IF THE SETTING seemed incongruous -- a luxurious home in an exclusive community near San Diego -- the circumstances were equally perplexing: More than three dozen bodies, dressed alike and partially covered with purple shrouds, found with no sign of violence or trauma. The explanation seems to be the mass suicide of members of a religious cult during a time they called their "holy week."As Christians celebrate their own Holy Week, the news from California gives all Americans pause. Are new cults springing up to rob families of their young?
NEWS
By Robert Jay Lifton | April 11, 2000
THE RECENT discovery of the violent deaths of more than 900 members of a Christian cult in Uganda may seem but another in a long string of tragic events in faraway places. But in this grisly episode lies a distinctly closer-to-home message: The danger of apocalyptic violence, not just in Uganda but anywhere in the world, did not die away with the first days of the new millennium as so many had assumed it would. The urge to "force the end" is distinctly a phenomenon of our moment, and from Heaven's Gate, the "peaceable" cult that committed mass suicide in 1997 in Rancho Santa Fe, Calif.
NEWS
By HOUSTON CHRONICLE | December 24, 1997
GARLAND, Texas -- The leader of a Taiwanese religious group that has settled in suburban Dallas said yesterday that he believes God will descend here in human form on March 31 and begin preparations to save the Western Hemisphere from nuclear annihilation in 1999.Hon-Ming Chen, a 42-year-old former sociology professor, also declared that 2,500 years ago he fathered Jesus Christ and that when God arrives next year, he will take Chen's form.If God doesn't appear as promised, Chen pledged to offer himself up in penance, submitting to death by stoning, %o crucifixion or some other method.
NEWS
By Robert Jay Lifton | April 11, 2000
THE RECENT discovery of the violent deaths of more than 900 members of a Christian cult in Uganda may seem but another in a long string of tragic events in faraway places. But in this grisly episode lies a distinctly closer-to-home message: The danger of apocalyptic violence, not just in Uganda but anywhere in the world, did not die away with the first days of the new millennium as so many had assumed it would. The urge to "force the end" is distinctly a phenomenon of our moment, and from Heaven's Gate, the "peaceable" cult that committed mass suicide in 1997 in Rancho Santa Fe, Calif.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Staff Writer | June 1, 1993
The Rev. Lawrence J. Gesy says that, from the beginning of the Branch Davidian standoff in Waco, Texas, he was pretty sure there would eventually be a mass suicide.Father Larry, as the Roman Catholic priest of the Baltimore archdiocese prefers to be known, has been studying fringe religious groups for about 13 years. He has just published a book, "Today's Destructive Cults and Movements," with a foreword by Mother Teresa of Calcutta, India.Born and reared on an Iowa farm, Father Larry was ordained in 1975.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 12, 2003
NEW YORK - Hector Berlioz was the Orson Welles of classical music - a certifiable genius, intriguingly eccentric, passionate, obstinate, way ahead of his time. Just as few people initially recognized the breadth of Welles' talent when it was first manifested in Citizen Kane, few understood the intense originality of Berlioz's first masterpiece, Symphonie fantastique. The analogy can be drawn out a little more. Consider the way Welles stretched himself even further with The Magnificent Ambersons but had a huge amount of his vision thrown onto the cutting room floor by insensitive producers.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Staff Writer | November 12, 1993
KIEV, Ukraine -- Ukrainian police were congratulating themselves on a job well done yesterday -- they had just saved the world.They had managed -- however inadvertently -- to capture doomsday cult leader Maria Devi Khristos, formerly known as Marina Tsvygun, thus forestalling a chain of events that once begun was supposed to result in the end of the world on Sunday.Many feared that the event, whose prelude has wrought havoc across the land, might have led to thousands of suicides.Col. Nikolai I. Kostyetski, a deputy chief of the Interior Ministry police, had begun to get impatient as "the end" neared.
FEATURES
By McClatchy News Service | May 31, 1991
SACRAMENTO -- The rolling hills of South Dakota gave birth to "Dances With Wolves." The streets of San Francisco were home to "Dirty Harry." And the gritty world of the Bronx gave life to "The Bonfire of the Vanities."Only Sacramento, the undisputed shallow-grave capital of the world, could offer us a low-budget horror flick called "Nudist Colony of the Dead."The plot? Suffice to say that religious fanatics force the closure of the "In the Buff" clothing-optional camp, prompting the nudists there to engage in a bit of ritualistic mass suicide.
NEWS
By HOUSTON CHRONICLE | December 24, 1997
GARLAND, Texas -- The leader of a Taiwanese religious group that has settled in suburban Dallas said yesterday that he believes God will descend here in human form on March 31 and begin preparations to save the Western Hemisphere from nuclear annihilation in 1999.Hon-Ming Chen, a 42-year-old former sociology professor, also declared that 2,500 years ago he fathered Jesus Christ and that when God arrives next year, he will take Chen's form.If God doesn't appear as promised, Chen pledged to offer himself up in penance, submitting to death by stoning, %o crucifixion or some other method.
NEWS
March 28, 1997
IF THE SETTING seemed incongruous -- a luxurious home in an exclusive community near San Diego -- the circumstances were equally perplexing: More than three dozen bodies, dressed alike and partially covered with purple shrouds, found with no sign of violence or trauma. The explanation seems to be the mass suicide of members of a religious cult during a time they called their "holy week."As Christians celebrate their own Holy Week, the news from California gives all Americans pause. Are new cults springing up to rob families of their young?
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 27, 1997
RANCHO SANTA FE, Calif. -- Police found the bodies of 39 young men, apparently cult members who believed they were sent to earth as angels, lying dead on their backs yesterday in a luxurious home -- victims of what authorities were calling a mass suicide.The cult they belonged to, called W.W. Higher Source, practiced celibacy and abstained from smoking and drinking, according to Milt Silverman Jr., an attorney for the owner of the home where the men died. They were apparently celebrating a "holy week" when they died, Silverman said.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Staff Writer | November 12, 1993
KIEV, Ukraine -- Ukrainian police were congratulating themselves on a job well done yesterday -- they had just saved the world.They had managed -- however inadvertently -- to capture doomsday cult leader Maria Devi Khristos, formerly known as Marina Tsvygun, thus forestalling a chain of events that once begun was supposed to result in the end of the world on Sunday.Many feared that the event, whose prelude has wrought havoc across the land, might have led to thousands of suicides.Col. Nikolai I. Kostyetski, a deputy chief of the Interior Ministry police, had begun to get impatient as "the end" neared.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Staff Writer | June 1, 1993
The Rev. Lawrence J. Gesy says that, from the beginning of the Branch Davidian standoff in Waco, Texas, he was pretty sure there would eventually be a mass suicide.Father Larry, as the Roman Catholic priest of the Baltimore archdiocese prefers to be known, has been studying fringe religious groups for about 13 years. He has just published a book, "Today's Destructive Cults and Movements," with a foreword by Mother Teresa of Calcutta, India.Born and reared on an Iowa farm, Father Larry was ordained in 1975.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | April 4, 1997
It is the 1970s, and out in the American heartland two small but devoted groups have begun spreading some pretty strange ideas about the future. Each follows a charismatic leader who preaches that the end is near. Salvation is possible only by following him, and deliverance will come from the skies.But during the next two decades, an odd thing happens. One group turns "respectable," almost banal in its normality. The other turns to mass suicide.The leader of the latter group, as you may have guessed, was a tranquil middle-aged man named Marshall Applewhite.
NEWS
By Abiodun Raufu and Abiodun Raufu,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 6, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. government expects the repatriation of Vietnamese boat people from Hong Kong to be carried out without the use of force, an administration official said yesterday."
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