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By Glenn McNatt | October 5, 1997
YEARS AGO, WHEN I was a cub reporter for the Newark Star-Ledger, an older colleague gave me a piece of advice: "Work here a coupla years, then get a job on TV," he said.He was thinking, no doubt, of the fantastic salaries television anchors earned. But as it happened, I never followed his advice, and today I still marvel at the fact that a fellow journalist once tried to persuade me to work in a medium that was so totally unreal.Yes, I know, we ink-stained wretches are prejudiced against our electronic brethren.
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NEWS
By Joseph Gasper | April 19, 2007
This week's shooting incident at Virginia Tech has spawned intense media coverage, much of which has served to perpetuate myths about school shootings. The first myth is that this latest shooting is a point in an escalation of such incidents. Although rampage school shootings increased during the 1990s, after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, school shootings virtually came to a halt. One explanation is that school officials have gotten better at foiling shooting plots before they materialize.
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By Norman Markowitz | October 1, 2000
A RECENT SURVEY of college students' knowledge of U.S. history yielded the sad fact that the students know little about the facts of U.S. history, failing even to place the Civil War within the right 50-year period. Sens. Joseph I. Lieberman and Slade Gorton easily guided a resolution denouncing these results through the U.S. Senate. Such surveys are not groundbreaking. They have long furnished grist for the mills of both critics of U.S. education and advertising agency executives. In the 1920s, ad agency researchers noted with some satisfaction that many Americans shared Henry Ford's opinion that history "is more or less bunk" and were ignorant of both current events and the historical past.
NEWS
By NICK MADIGAN and NICK MADIGAN,SUN REPORTER | January 8, 2006
WHEN HE CONSIDERS THE STATE OF the media in 2006, Matthew T. Felling harks back to 17th-century metaphysical poet John Donne, who famously observed that "no man is an island." "In the 21st century, we're all media islands -- we're a nation of virtual archipelagoes," said Felling, media director at the Center for Media and Public Affairs in Washington D.C. "Want to watch last night's Lost on the subway? Here's your $2 download," Felling said. "Love that song you heard, but don't want to put down $15 for the whole CD, and get it right now, instead of trekking to Border's?
NEWS
By CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER | November 26, 1993
In a recent essay in The American Scholar titled ''Defining Deviancy Down,'' Daniel Patrick Moynihan offers an arresting view of the epidemic of deviancy -- of criminality, family breakdown, mental illness -- that has come to characterize the American social landscape. Deviancy has reached such incomprehensible proportions, argues Mr. Moynihan, that we have had to adopt a singular form of denial: We deal with the epidemic simply by defining away most of the disease. We lower the threshold for what we are prepared to call normal in order to keep the volume of deviancy -- redefined deviancy -- within manageable proportions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Kephart and By Beth Kephart,Special to the Sun | February 4, 2001
"Salvation: Black People and Love," by bell hooks. William Morrow. 256 pages. $22. With her 18th book, "Salvation: Black People and Love," the feminist theorist bell hooks has her heart, it would seem, in all the right places. "Salvation," hooks tells her readers, is about love as the "platform on which to renew progressive anti-racist struggle," love as the "blueprint for black survival and self-determination." Who could deny the probable power of such a thesis? Who wouldn't want to see it coherently, persuasively argued?
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | November 28, 2001
The number of Howard Community College students taking visual and performing arts classes has jumped nearly 40 percent in the past year, mirroring a growing diversity of interests of students attending the vocationally oriented two-year school. "We've made a very big effort to make sure students have a comprehensive arts education, from the business side to the performance side," said Valerie E. Costantini, chairwoman of the arts and humanities department at the college. School officials believe the prospect of new facilities has given an extra boost to HCC arts programs.
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | November 12, 1991
In Mexico, a song by two leading pop singers encouraged teen-age listeners to put off having sex because "love on the run creates bread-and-water children." In Turkey, a televised spot by a top comedian showed a fictional farmer able to leave each of his seven sons only a flower-pot full of dirt, the result of generations of large families. And in Zimbabwe, a radio soap opera dealt with the personal burden faced by men who had several children.For nearly a decade, Phyllis T. Piotrow and Patrick L. Coleman, two Johns Hopkins University public health communications specialists, have worked to develop and disseminate these and other mass media campaigns promoting family planning and sexual responsibility in developing countries around the world.
NEWS
By Adam Clayton Powell III | May 18, 1997
THE ONLY CERTAINTY for the next 160 years is change. We will still have news and people reporting the news. But 22nd-century news outlets may not be recognizable to us as newspapers, as newcasts or even as Internet services.Think back to the year The Sun was founded: Still ahead were the telegraph and its ability to transmit news instantly; photography and its ability to capture an event almost as the human eye, and the steam-powered press that fostered the rise of mass-circulation newspapers and magazines.
NEWS
By DENNIS BARTEL | March 21, 1994
I knew Charles Bukowski. We bet the horses together sometimes. I can still see him, in an old undershirt and army-surplus pants, his face like a spoiled melon, upturned, watching the tote.This was many years ago. Back in L.A. Before the movie ''Barfly.'' Before many of the 40 books: ''Notes of a Dirty Old Man,'' ''Flower, Fist and Bestial Wail,'' ''Erections, Ejaculations, Exhibitions and General Tales of Ordinary Madness.'' The cult around Bukowski was still small back then, made up of druggies, whores and other outcasts, and peach-fuzz kids like me fascinated with the slimy underbelly and barely literate enough to read Bukowski's simple, brutal picture of it.Now Bukowski has died a hard death at 73, leukemia and pneumonia, disappearing in the dead of winter.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | October 3, 2004
JUST WHEN you think the human race has turned sex into some kind of carnal Match Game, with hook-ups, buddy sex and "friends with benefits," there is Dr. Ruth to cheer you up. As tiny as a sparkplug and with just as much energy, the gently aging sex therapist is still talking as if sex is an act of love, humor, patience and communication between two people who are committed to each other. "I am a grandmother, and I am still talking about sex," Westheimer told a packed auditorium of Johns Hopkins University students recently.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2004
The noisy clackety-clack of the Linotype machine, once a staple of print shops and newspaper composing rooms everywhere, is an industrial sound that has practically vanished. The Linotype, whose operators created lines of type rather than individual letters, replaced the laborious job and tedium of hand-setting text. "They quickly cast characters in various typefaces and sizes, allowing publishers to print larger works in greater numbers at lower cost. Newspapers, which had consumed large amounts of lead type, could become a truly mass medium, delivering more news to more people affordably," observed a 1996 article in Editor & Publisher.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | November 28, 2001
The number of Howard Community College students taking visual and performing arts classes has jumped nearly 40 percent in the past year, mirroring a growing diversity of interests of students attending the vocationally oriented two-year school. "We've made a very big effort to make sure students have a comprehensive arts education, from the business side to the performance side," said Valerie E. Costantini, chairwoman of the arts and humanities department at the college. School officials believe the prospect of new facilities has given an extra boost to HCC arts programs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Kephart and By Beth Kephart,Special to the Sun | February 4, 2001
"Salvation: Black People and Love," by bell hooks. William Morrow. 256 pages. $22. With her 18th book, "Salvation: Black People and Love," the feminist theorist bell hooks has her heart, it would seem, in all the right places. "Salvation," hooks tells her readers, is about love as the "platform on which to renew progressive anti-racist struggle," love as the "blueprint for black survival and self-determination." Who could deny the probable power of such a thesis? Who wouldn't want to see it coherently, persuasively argued?
TOPIC
By Norman Markowitz | October 1, 2000
A RECENT SURVEY of college students' knowledge of U.S. history yielded the sad fact that the students know little about the facts of U.S. history, failing even to place the Civil War within the right 50-year period. Sens. Joseph I. Lieberman and Slade Gorton easily guided a resolution denouncing these results through the U.S. Senate. Such surveys are not groundbreaking. They have long furnished grist for the mills of both critics of U.S. education and advertising agency executives. In the 1920s, ad agency researchers noted with some satisfaction that many Americans shared Henry Ford's opinion that history "is more or less bunk" and were ignorant of both current events and the historical past.
NEWS
September 9, 2000
IN THE PAST month, horrified Russians have watched officials' helplessness as a nuclear submarine sank and Moscow's gigantic television tower burned out of control. Yet even these catastrophes could pale in comparison with a disaster currently in the making -- President Vladimir Putin's attempt to muzzle the country's free-wheeling media. At the moment the Kremlin is trying to take over two nationwide television networks. The owner of gutsy NTV, Vladimir Gusinsky, is resisting, even though he was jailed on trumped-up charges for three days during the spring.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | March 16, 1994
Scott Ponemone's two series of paintings at Galerie Francoise, "Past Time" and "Double Time," were created from photographs taken at Oriole Park at Camden Yards. But they don't show the playing field or the stands. Rather, they're of people riding escalators amid the behind-the-scenes structure of steel posts and beams that place the crowds in impersonal, geometric settings.Ponemone uses other devices to further distance these scenes from naturalism. The people in a given image tend to be tinted all one color -- all blue or all orangy brown, for instance.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 2, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Why is Donna E. Shalala wearing a milk mustache?The secretary of health and human services has been showing up in full-color ads for months, a line of dairy product etched above her upper lip.Shalala, with the likes of David Copperfield, Spike Lee and Tyra Banks, is pitching the dairy industry. And some folks are having a cow over it.Shalala has insisted that her promotion of the milk industry is meant to encourage teen-age girls to get more calcium and prevent osteoporosis later in life.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 5, 2000
MOSCOW - The man who controls Russia's largest television network said yesterday that the government was trying to take it away from him, but he vowed to give it away to others before allowing the Kremlin of Vladimir V. Putin to seize control. "If I cede to the ultimatum," Boris A. Berezovsky told Putin in a letter that he made public, "TV information will cease in Russia and will be replaced by TV propaganda controlled by your aides." Berezovsky, who assembled a business empire in oil and car sales, developed close and apparently profitable ties to former President Boris N. Yeltsin and freely used his network to promote his political interests, is casting himself in the unlikely role of defender of a free press.
TOPIC
By Jeff Cohen | March 7, 1999
LET ME acknowledge my bias up front: I subscribe to the old-fashioned notion that party activists and voters -- not the mass media -- should be the main players in nominating political candidates.As for Hillary Rodham Clinton, her New York Senate candidacy -- launched by political reporters left dangerously idle by the closing of Monica-gate -- rocketed through the studios of "Crossfire" and "Nightline" to the covers of Newsweek and Time. A real grass-roots mobilization of the media elite.
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