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By GREGORY KANE | August 25, 2007
According to the BMI chart, the Baltimore Ravens should rename themselves the Baltimore Fat Boys. BMI stands for "body mass index." It's basically a ratio of weight to height that's supposed to tell if you're normal, overweight or an obese fatso. The weights and heights of 12 of my beloved Ravens are on my 2007 Baltimore Ravens calendar, which I proudly display on my bedroom wall. Before I tell you why the BMI chart shows that several Ravens are either fat or overweight, I'll tell you a quick story about why I even bothered to compute a body mass index for them.
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NEWS
By Clarence Page | September 5, 2007
Americans are too fat and getting fatter, a new study shows. I'm one of them. I'm not cool with that, but some people are. Some of them work in the restaurant and fast-food industries that lure us, the fat challenged, into feeding our habits. Some of them are loved ones who, like my late mom, have three memorable mantras: "Did you eat yet?" "Please have some more" and "Don't forget to clean your plate." Little did Mom know how cleaning that plate would clog our arteries. Mom comes to mind this time of year as Trust for America's Health, a research group funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, releases its fourth annual fatso survey.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 12, 1997
DENVER -- After the holidays, people across the country realize they have a little more around the middle than they want, but there is a little less of it on Coloradans.People in Colorado are the thinnest, on average, of those in any of the 48 contiguous states.A study by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and state health departments has found that only 19.9 percent of Coloradans are overweight, compared with the median of 26.7 for the nation.Hawaii was the only other state where residents are as thin, with 19.7 being overweight.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 25, 2007
According to the BMI chart, the Baltimore Ravens should rename themselves the Baltimore Fat Boys. BMI stands for "body mass index." It's basically a ratio of weight to height that's supposed to tell if you're normal, overweight or an obese fatso. The weights and heights of 12 of my beloved Ravens are on my 2007 Baltimore Ravens calendar, which I proudly display on my bedroom wall. Before I tell you why the BMI chart shows that several Ravens are either fat or overweight, I'll tell you a quick story about why I even bothered to compute a body mass index for them.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | June 15, 2005
NEW YORK - Obese teenagers who took the weight loss drug orlistat while making lifestyle changes gained less weight over 54 weeks, on average, than a control group of teens who changed behaviors but took a dummy pill, a new study found. Overall, teenagers taking orlistat experienced a reduction in body mass index, a critical measure of whether one's weight falls within a healthy range for one's height, while those in the placebo group saw their BMIs rise. Weight increased by about a pound on orlistat and by almost seven pounds for the placebo group.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | February 23, 2003
A friend and I walk briskly for five miles on Saturdays and then chat over a breakfast of bagels or pancakes at a nearby diner. Are we undoing any benefit of our exercise with the breakfast we eat? It depends on what health benefits you want from your five-miler. No matter what you eat, you are still getting valuable aerobic benefits from your walk. If weight loss is your goal, however, you should rethink your routine. Are bagels and pancakes the pot of gold at the end of your outing?
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2003
A 20-year-old who is severely obese could lose more than a decade of life to medical complications, according to a new study on a national epidemic that some experts say could rival smoking in its consequences. Researchers found that the severely obese could lose five to 20 years - depending on whether one is male or female, black or white - and discovered that even a mild paunch can translate into an earlier death. "The message is that obesity is not a cosmetic problem, not a problem to be made light of," said Dr. David B. Allison of the University of Alabama, Birmingham, who conducted the study with researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | June 3, 2005
I am a 56-year-old woman, 5 feet 6 and 138 pounds. I am in good condition and walk 2 miles a day, but I need an effective exercise for my abs. What can you recommend? We posed your question to Jeffrey W. Brandes, certified personal trainer at Merritt Downtown Athletic Club in Baltimore, who says you should start with basic floor crunches. When your abdominal muscles become stronger, Brandes says you can begin incorporating single and double leg movements, and twists to work the obliques.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | March 13, 2005
MIAMI HEAT superstar Shaquille O'Neal has a legitimate gripe, and for once it's not about Kobe Bryant. Shaq is a big, big guy, but he was a little taken aback when he found out the other day that he was rated as "obese" in a weight analysis of NBA players that was based on a formula promoted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The CDC uses something called the Body Mass Index (BMI) to assess the risk of weight-related diseases by placing individuals into one of four categories, which are determined by a calculation of height and weight.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2005
Greg Peyser and Benson Erwin never think of themselves as overweight. As members of Johns Hopkins' top-ranked lacrosse team, they lift weights two to three times a week, and five days a week they run, scrimmage and hustle through a series of agility, shooting, passing and defensive drills "I feel like I'm in the best shape of my life," said Erwin, 23, a senior majoring in international studies. But all is not as it seems. Because both athletes are 6 feet 1 inch tall and weigh about 200 pounds, they're both overweight - according to federal standards - and so are most of their teammates.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | June 15, 2005
NEW YORK - Obese teenagers who took the weight loss drug orlistat while making lifestyle changes gained less weight over 54 weeks, on average, than a control group of teens who changed behaviors but took a dummy pill, a new study found. Overall, teenagers taking orlistat experienced a reduction in body mass index, a critical measure of whether one's weight falls within a healthy range for one's height, while those in the placebo group saw their BMIs rise. Weight increased by about a pound on orlistat and by almost seven pounds for the placebo group.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | June 3, 2005
I am a 56-year-old woman, 5 feet 6 and 138 pounds. I am in good condition and walk 2 miles a day, but I need an effective exercise for my abs. What can you recommend? We posed your question to Jeffrey W. Brandes, certified personal trainer at Merritt Downtown Athletic Club in Baltimore, who says you should start with basic floor crunches. When your abdominal muscles become stronger, Brandes says you can begin incorporating single and double leg movements, and twists to work the obliques.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2005
Greg Peyser and Benson Erwin never think of themselves as overweight. As members of Johns Hopkins' top-ranked lacrosse team, they lift weights two to three times a week, and five days a week they run, scrimmage and hustle through a series of agility, shooting, passing and defensive drills "I feel like I'm in the best shape of my life," said Erwin, 23, a senior majoring in international studies. But all is not as it seems. Because both athletes are 6 feet 1 inch tall and weigh about 200 pounds, they're both overweight - according to federal standards - and so are most of their teammates.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | March 13, 2005
MIAMI HEAT superstar Shaquille O'Neal has a legitimate gripe, and for once it's not about Kobe Bryant. Shaq is a big, big guy, but he was a little taken aback when he found out the other day that he was rated as "obese" in a weight analysis of NBA players that was based on a formula promoted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The CDC uses something called the Body Mass Index (BMI) to assess the risk of weight-related diseases by placing individuals into one of four categories, which are determined by a calculation of height and weight.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 1, 2004
A major report on the growing problem of childhood obesity calls for "fundamental changes in our society" that would affect how children spend their time and how food is advertised, packaged and sold to them. The report by the Institute of Medicine calls for schools to restrict vending machine sales and require at least 30 minutes of physical activity each day. Planners should design communities that encourage walking and other exercise, parents should restrict television and computer time to a total of two hours a day, and federal officials should monitor food advertising geared toward children, it says.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2004
Watch out, Silicon Valley: Maryland is nipping at your heels. The Milken Institute ranks the state fourth in the nation on its 2004 technology and science index, with a score that's a fraction behind second-place California and third-place Colorado. The index, first published in 2002 and updated last week, measures how well-positioned each state is to perform in an economy that's increasingly based on high technology and knowledge. Massachusetts ranked first. Maryland's Department of Business and Economic Development is delighted by the results because the state -- which placed fourth last time, too -- improved its average score while the rest of the top five dropped.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | September 5, 2007
Americans are too fat and getting fatter, a new study shows. I'm one of them. I'm not cool with that, but some people are. Some of them work in the restaurant and fast-food industries that lure us, the fat challenged, into feeding our habits. Some of them are loved ones who, like my late mom, have three memorable mantras: "Did you eat yet?" "Please have some more" and "Don't forget to clean your plate." Little did Mom know how cleaning that plate would clog our arteries. Mom comes to mind this time of year as Trust for America's Health, a research group funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, releases its fourth annual fatso survey.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 1, 2004
A major report on the growing problem of childhood obesity calls for "fundamental changes in our society" that would affect how children spend their time and how food is advertised, packaged and sold to them. The report by the Institute of Medicine calls for schools to restrict vending machine sales and require at least 30 minutes of physical activity each day. Planners should design communities that encourage walking and other exercise, parents should restrict television and computer time to a total of two hours a day, and federal officials should monitor food advertising geared toward children, it says.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | February 23, 2003
A friend and I walk briskly for five miles on Saturdays and then chat over a breakfast of bagels or pancakes at a nearby diner. Are we undoing any benefit of our exercise with the breakfast we eat? It depends on what health benefits you want from your five-miler. No matter what you eat, you are still getting valuable aerobic benefits from your walk. If weight loss is your goal, however, you should rethink your routine. Are bagels and pancakes the pot of gold at the end of your outing?
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2003
A 20-year-old who is severely obese could lose more than a decade of life to medical complications, according to a new study on a national epidemic that some experts say could rival smoking in its consequences. Researchers found that the severely obese could lose five to 20 years - depending on whether one is male or female, black or white - and discovered that even a mild paunch can translate into an earlier death. "The message is that obesity is not a cosmetic problem, not a problem to be made light of," said Dr. David B. Allison of the University of Alabama, Birmingham, who conducted the study with researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center.
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