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By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2005
Perhaps the most terrible images of last month's tsunami are the mass graves: pits lined with children, bodies bulldozed over with dirt. This footage is striking in part because it is rare. Usually the American camera discovers mass graves as they are uncovered, instead of created, when all that remains is a wreckage of skulls instead of distinct faces with matted eyelashes and blue lips. But the sad sight on the Indian Ocean's shore is also jarring because it flies in the face of our national instincts.
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By Lara J. Nettelfield and Sarah Wagner | June 6, 2011
Despite his efforts to stave off his long-overdue date with justice, indicted war criminal Ratko Mladic appeared before a panel of judges at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia in The Hague on Friday. Soon he will stand trial for war crimes, crimes against humanity, and genocide, atrocities he planned and executed throughout the 1992-1995 war, from the siege of Sarajevo to the concentration camps of Prijedor and the genocide at Srebrenica. Mr. Mladic's last request before his transfer was to visit the grave of his daughter, Ana, who committed suicide in 1994 with her father's pistol.
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By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 8, 2002
KABUL, Afghanistan -- Residents have discovered three mass graves near the town of Bamian in the rugged Hindu Kush Mountains, at a site near where the Taliban and opposition Northern Alliance forces frequently clashed, United Nations officials said yesterday. Afghans in the area say the graves are filled with civilians, ethnic Hazara killed by the Taliban just before the regime's collapse in December. The Taliban, mostly Pashtuns and militant followers of the Sunni branch of Islam, were accused several times in recent years of revenge killings of the Shiite Hazaras in the Bamian province.
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By Borzou Daragahi and Saif Rasheed and Borzou Daragahi and Saif Rasheed,Los Angeles Times | March 9, 2008
BAGHDAD -- Mystery and dread shrouded a freshly discovered mass grave site filled with the remains of at least 50 and perhaps as many as 100 people, some of them children, in a river valley northeast of Baghdad. Iraqi police announced the discovery yesterday after conducting a raid in the area and stumbling upon the badly decomposed bodies a day earlier. The dead were buried in one of the many fruit, date and palm orchards that line the Diyala River near the town of Khalis, just north of the provincial capital of Baqouba.
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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 18, 1999
PRISTINA, Yugoslavia -- At least 10,000 people were slaughtered by Serbian forces during their three-month campaign to drive the Albanians from Kosovo, according to war crimes investigators, NATO peacekeeping troops and humanitarian agencies struggling to keep up with fresh reports each day of newly discovered bodies and graves.That death toll would be more than twice the number of about 4,600 dead estimated by the State Department in late May, shortly before the international war crimes tribunal in The Hague indicted Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic and four of his top aides on charges of crimes against humanity.
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By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 1, 1996
TUZLA, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- Marking an important step in the U.S. role in securing Bosnia's peace, American soldiers will provide security to United Nations war crimes investigators this week as they begin examining suspected mass graves, officials said yesterday.Word that U.S. soldiers are about to offer limited support to the gruesome, politically sensitive work beginning tomorrow near the former "safe area" of Srebrenica in eastern Bosnia-Herzegovina coincided with a visit to the country yesterday by Defense Secretary William J. Perry, who said he fully supports the plan.
NEWS
By Solomon Moore and Solomon Moore,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 16, 2005
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Two mass graves that appear to contain the remains of as many as 7,000 people killed by Saddam Hussein's government have been discovered in southern Iraq, according to an Iraqi government minister. The new Iraqi government may use some of the remains to build its case against war crimes suspects, including Hussein, Human Rights Minister Bakhtiar Amin said yesterday. Iraqi officials said they have been unable to excavate the burial grounds found earlier this year because of security concerns and because Iraq lacks enough forensic workers to perform the grisly task.
NEWS
By Lara J. Nettelfield and Sarah Wagner | June 6, 2011
Despite his efforts to stave off his long-overdue date with justice, indicted war criminal Ratko Mladic appeared before a panel of judges at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia in The Hague on Friday. Soon he will stand trial for war crimes, crimes against humanity, and genocide, atrocities he planned and executed throughout the 1992-1995 war, from the siege of Sarajevo to the concentration camps of Prijedor and the genocide at Srebrenica. Mr. Mladic's last request before his transfer was to visit the grave of his daughter, Ana, who committed suicide in 1994 with her father's pistol.
NEWS
By Gordon Livingston | January 3, 2005
IN THE CALCULUS of human misery, it is impossible to grasp the cost of the tsunami that hit South Asia. At some point, our ability to respond emotionally is overwhelmed by the numbers of dead. The TV news coverage, with its wrecked resort areas, boats pushed inland and rows of bodies, fails utterly to convey the weight of grief that these pictures represent. Here, we are told, is a man who has lost his wife, there a mother who can find only one of her eight children. The faces we see reflect despair.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Sun Staff Correspondent | March 2, 1991
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia -- A large portion of Iraq's army cannot be accounted for, and the death toll may be far higher than imagined, military officials acknowledged yesterday.Commanders say they do not know what happened to many of the half-million men Iraq was known to have amassed in Kuwait, even after considering widespread desertions and the mass surrenders by dispirited Iraqi troops."I think it's going to turn out to be enormous," Marine Brig. Gen. Richard I. Neal said of the Iraqi casualty rate, although he cautioned that he did not know a total.
NEWS
By Solomon Moore and Solomon Moore,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 16, 2005
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Two mass graves that appear to contain the remains of as many as 7,000 people killed by Saddam Hussein's government have been discovered in southern Iraq, according to an Iraqi government minister. The new Iraqi government may use some of the remains to build its case against war crimes suspects, including Hussein, Human Rights Minister Bakhtiar Amin said yesterday. Iraqi officials said they have been unable to excavate the burial grounds found earlier this year because of security concerns and because Iraq lacks enough forensic workers to perform the grisly task.
FEATURES
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2005
Perhaps the most terrible images of last month's tsunami are the mass graves: pits lined with children, bodies bulldozed over with dirt. This footage is striking in part because it is rare. Usually the American camera discovers mass graves as they are uncovered, instead of created, when all that remains is a wreckage of skulls instead of distinct faces with matted eyelashes and blue lips. But the sad sight on the Indian Ocean's shore is also jarring because it flies in the face of our national instincts.
NEWS
By Gordon Livingston | January 3, 2005
IN THE CALCULUS of human misery, it is impossible to grasp the cost of the tsunami that hit South Asia. At some point, our ability to respond emotionally is overwhelmed by the numbers of dead. The TV news coverage, with its wrecked resort areas, boats pushed inland and rows of bodies, fails utterly to convey the weight of grief that these pictures represent. Here, we are told, is a man who has lost his wife, there a mother who can find only one of her eight children. The faces we see reflect despair.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 18, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Officially, it is the Committee of War Rejecters, but its members prefer to call themselves the men with cut ears. Its chairman is a homeless 29-year-old named Saad Kadim, who joined the National Society for the Defense of Human Rights last year to document three decades of abuses committed by the regime of dictator Saddam Hussein. Kadim is missing the top half of his right ear, the punishment inflicted for deserting the army in 1994, branding him a traitor. Three thousand men are registered with the committee, and Kadim believes there are thousands more yet to be found.
NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and Zoran Cirjakovic and Tracy Wilkinson and Zoran Cirjakovic,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 21, 2003
SREBRENICA, Bosnia-Herzegovina - Draped in green cloth, 107 coffins were passed by outstretched arms yesterday over the heads of families mourning an 8-year-old massacre. The caskets were lowered, one by one, to final burial. Fathers with their sons. Brothers. Cousins. All of them male Muslims between ages 16 and 75. In a solemn ceremony, thousands of Bosnians and their guest of honor, former U.S. President Bill Clinton, dedicated the first official memorial to the more than 7,000 victims of the single bloodiest atrocity in Europe since World War II - a "genocidal madness," as Clinton put it. "History has assigned us a role as witness to human hatred," said Advija Ibrahimovic, who was 10 when her father was taken from her and led to his death, in opening the ceremony.
NEWS
July 18, 2003
THE LIGHT at the end of the tunnel recedes into the distance. The American general in charge of soldiers and Marines in Iraq acknowledges that he is fighting a guerrilla war; the Pentagon considers extending the deployment of individual units there to as much as a year; India, France and Germany decline to send troops to help out; Washington says it may call up the National Guard this winter to fill in the gaps. Reports from Iraq suggest that ordinary soldiers there aren't too happy about all of this.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | April 22, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Experts in surveillance photography, wartime propaganda and Balkan diplomacy say there is every reason to believe that atrocities are being committed against the ethnic Albanian majority in Kosovo, but little reason at this time to accept reports of huge numbers of dead and missing Kosovars that are being bandied about.The U.S. State Department said Monday that a half-million ethnic Albanian men are unaccounted for in the disputed province, which is part of Serb-dominated Yugoslavia but 90 percent Albanian, and a department spokesman hinted that 100,000 may have met with foul play.
NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and Zoran Cirjakovic and Tracy Wilkinson and Zoran Cirjakovic,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 21, 2003
SREBRENICA, Bosnia-Herzegovina - Draped in green cloth, 107 coffins were passed by outstretched arms yesterday over the heads of families mourning an 8-year-old massacre. The caskets were lowered, one by one, to final burial. Fathers with their sons. Brothers. Cousins. All of them male Muslims between ages 16 and 75. In a solemn ceremony, thousands of Bosnians and their guest of honor, former U.S. President Bill Clinton, dedicated the first official memorial to the more than 7,000 victims of the single bloodiest atrocity in Europe since World War II - a "genocidal madness," as Clinton put it. "History has assigned us a role as witness to human hatred," said Advija Ibrahimovic, who was 10 when her father was taken from her and led to his death, in opening the ceremony.
NEWS
By John Daniszewski and John Daniszewski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 9, 2003
SALMAN PAK, Iraq - As survivors desperate for news of missing relatives looked on, a big yellow backhoe methodically cut a trench in the sandy dirt, bringing up two more bodies yesterday. It was a small recovery for a hot morning's work, but it did not deter Sheik Khadim Fartousi, leader of an Islamic charity, who told reporters that they were standing on a mass grave - the site where some of the last executions of political prisoners of Saddam Hussein's regime took place. Fartousi said four busloads of political prisoners were brought to this area near the infamous Salman Pak training camp and chemical weapons facility and executed in April, only five days before U.S. forces took nearby Baghdad.
NEWS
By Eric Slater and Eric Slater,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 14, 2003
HILLAH, Iraq - Hundreds of Iraqis whose relatives vanished during the 1991 Shiite Muslim uprising watched yesterday as workers dug into the mass grave, a backhoe pulling up eight or nine bodies at a time, and perhaps as many as 3,000 over the past four days. Villagers clutched the remains to their chests, trying to keep them intact as they fell from the machine's big shovel. They laid the remains in the dirt nearby, next to hundreds of others waiting to be claimed. Then they searched for personal papers, the remnants of a wristwatch or other items that might reveal the identities of the dead.
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