Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMass Destruction
IN THE NEWS

Mass Destruction

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | May 25, 2004
SOMETIMES YOU don't know whether to laugh or cry. Time.com reported last week that the FBI had alerted law enforcement offices around America to be on the lookout for possible suicide bombers. Police forces were told to keep an eye out for people wearing bulky overcoats in the heat of summer, people with electric wires sticking out of their clothing, or people smelling of chemicals. Unfortunately, such bizarre warnings could be the first of many, because while we have not found the WMD in Iraq, we have found there a disturbing number of PMDs - people of mass destruction.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 9, 2013
The Sun editorial staff is of the opinion that the "U.S. must act decisively and forcefully to punish [President Bashar] Assad for his choice to unleash chemical weapons on innocent civilians in Syria - even if our allies won't" ("Where is the outrage?" Sept. 4). The editorial goes on to suggest that there were "more than 1,400 people dead, 400 of them children, from rocket attacks spreading a chemical agent. " But is President Barack Obama's belated concern over civilian casualties really about punishing Mr. Assad for using chemical weapons - or about covering up his Middle East policy disasters in Libya and Egypt, plus his ill-advised "red line" speech?
Advertisement
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 1, 1998
WASHINGTON -- In a last-minute compromise, Congress has revived the independent commission charged with streamlining the efforts of 96 federal agencies that deal with the threat of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons, as well as the means to deliver them.The panel was left for dead three months ago, largely at the hands of House Speaker Newt Gingrich and a top foreign policy lieutenant, Rep. Benjamin A. Gilman, a New York Republican. The lawmakers objected to the scope and makeup of the panel, headed by John Deutch, former director of the CIA, and let its legislative mandate lapse.
NEWS
August 26, 2013
David Zurawik feels that George W. Bush lied about Iraq's possession of weapons of mass destruction (" Why I stopped trusting TV history - totally," Aug. 24 ). Mr. Zurawik can critique the investigative techniques of the National Geographic show, but he has no evidence to show that the Bush administration and our European allies lied about their knowledge of WMDs. Iraqi scientists even convinced Saddam Hussein's generals that they were making progress on WMDs so they would not end up in the wood chipper.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 24, 2004
WASHINGTON - President Bush eased economic sanctions on Libya yesterday, rewarding Col. Muammar el Kadafi for renouncing weapons of mass destruction and opening opportunities for American companies to do business in his nation. The action, announced by the White House while Bush was in Florida, had been anticipated for many weeks. But it was nonetheless drastic, since it softened a hard-line policy that has been in place for years against a leader who was once an enemy of the United States.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 21, 2004
While the White House was fixated on Saddam Hussein's interest in procuring biological and chemical weapons, evidence uncovered by American investigators suggests that the Iraqi president spent his final years in power more determined to develop and deploy conventional ballistic missiles, hoping to keep pace with his neighbors in the Middle East. And in that quest for weapons of more-modest destruction, the evidence shows that Iraq was not a major threat to its neighbors, much less to Europe or the United States.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 13, 2002
WASHINGTON - Their prestige and influence at stake, world leaders began coalescing yesterday around the goal of destroying Iraq's weapons of mass destruction, raising the prospect that a less-threatening Saddam Hussein might be able to avoid an American attack and cling to power. Responding to mounting pressure from the United States, capped by President Bush's warning to the United Nations General Assembly yesterday, a number of leaders echoed American calls for urgent action by the international community to disarm Iraq.
NEWS
By Steve Yetiv | March 8, 1998
The most recent crisis in the Persian Gulf appears to be over, but few people would place big bets on the notion that Iraqi President Saddam Hussein will actually relinquish his weapons of mass destruction. While we may hope that this agreement sticks, we need to be wary of Hussein and cognizant of why he has become such a threat in the first place. For that purpose, we need not look too far.While Hussein is an over-ambitious, brutal dictator, Western countries are partly to blame for creating him. This is something we should all remember, because if sanctions are ever lifted on Iraq, the financial temptation to arm him again will be strong among some Western arms manufacturers and even nations.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 22, 2002
WASHINGTON - In still another blunt warning from the Bush administration, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said yesterday that terrorists "inevitably" will obtain chemical, biological or nuclear weapons and try to use them against Americans. "We have to recognize that terrorist networks have relationships with terrorist states that have weapons of mass destruction and that they inevitably are going to get their hands on them, and they would not hesitate one minute in using them," Rumsfeld told a congressional panel.
NEWS
By Richard B. Schmitt and Richard B. Schmitt,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 13, 2005
WASHINGTON - Three British nationals whose alleged surveillance of U.S. financial landmarks triggered an increase in the terrorist threat level last summer were indicted by a federal grand jury on charges that they were planning a catastrophic attack with "weapons of mass destruction," the Justice Department disclosed yesterday. The federal indictment, unsealed in New York, alleges that the three men, including a reputed top al-Qaida operative, conducted secret surveillance of the New York Stock Exchange, the headquarters of the International Monetary Fund in Washington and other structures in 2000 and 2001 as part of a plot to destroy the buildings and kill Americans, Justice Department officials said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2013
Don't trust TV history - ever. That's the big conclusion I came to this week after starting out on the simple assignment of previewing a two-hour National Geographic special on the Iraq War. “America Vs. Iraq,” which premieres at 9 p.m. Monday on the National Geographic Channel, drove me to it with a maddening hole at its core. And that squishy center of imprecise research and confusing assertions has enormous consequences in that it gives former Vice President Dick Cheney and the rest of George W. Bush's administration loads of wiggle room to try and rewrite history with their claims that they didn't lie about possessing evidence that Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction.
NEWS
July 10, 2013
Ray McGovern's commentary on National Security Agency eavesdropping was a blast of fresh air ("Clean house over NSA spying," July 8). It was wonderful to read it on the same day I attended a vigil on behalf of Pfc. Bradley Manning at Fort Meade. What can be more undemocratic than government operatives lying to the citizens? If you can't be honest with the taxpayers, you should find another job. I am in complete agreement that President Obama should fire Director of National Intelligence James Clapper and NSA Director Keith Alexander.
NEWS
By Ralph Masi | February 21, 2013
It has been 10 years since then-Secretary of State Colin Powell's U.N. speech on Iraq's weapons of mass destruction. I watched the secretary's presentation intently on assignment to Fort Jackson, S.C. that day. The presentation, of course, would make the final case for war with Iraq before the world, Congress and, arguably most importantly, the American people. Like many of my colleagues on active duty, I had been highly skeptical of this pretext for war while serving as a military planner, particularly over what many regarded as plausible exaggerations and outright distortions.
NEWS
December 9, 2012
Here we go again with a "chemical weapons" bogey man ("New fears over Syrian conflict," Dec. 4). America invaded and is occupying Iraq thanks to alleged weapons of mass destruction, and now Syria is in our gun sights based on similar claims. Don't we know when to quit with these outdated scare tactics? Most nightly news shows are talking about a "fiscal cliff" our economy is headed for, and so now is not the time for a new military exercise in the Middle East. As much as I deplore the horrors of present day Syria, there are other nations in the area that should be involved.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,david.wood@baltsun.com | April 24, 2009
In a crowded classroom above the lawns of the U.S. Naval Academy, midshipmen are getting a dose of reality from a muscular Marine officer in desert fatigues. "You have to have the willpower to make a decision even when you don't have all the answers, even when your decision is going to get someone killed," growls Capt. Ted Greeley. "Everybody's going to be scared, physically exhausted, unwilling to go on ... but you have to." Greeley led a Marine rifle company through fierce fighting in Fallujah, Iraq.
NEWS
By RON SMITH | April 3, 2009
It's hard to decide which part of the establishment to despise the most, the corporate or the political. I say it's fair to divide your disdain equally, since the political class and the corporate cutthroats are co-conspirators in the creation of the world's most powerful oligarchy, the one that has leeched mountains of money from the masses for the oligarchs' own hedonistic pursuits, sparking the financial forest fire now engulfing the world economy....
TOPIC
By THE ECONOMIST | February 9, 2003
IN AN IDEAL WORLD, working out whether Saddam Hussein still has or wants weapons of mass destruction would not be a matter of subjective judgment, turning on how you rate Colin Powell's performance in the Security Council on Wednesday. Some people feel that America's secretary of state put forward an impressive case. Others argue that most of what he said was familiar, and that the bits that were new were inconclusive. The truth, vexingly, lies somewhere in between. But what is plain is that the Americans have not produced the fabled "smoking gun" that some governments insist on before they will support an American-led war to disarm Iraq.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 31, 2003
LONDON - Prime Minister Tony Blair angrily denied yesterday allegations that in making the case for the Iraqi war his government had exaggerated intelligence reports showing that Saddam Hussein was harboring weapons of mass destruction. Speaking at a news conference in Warsaw, the British leader said he had "absolutely no doubt" that such weapons existed. "Saddam's history in relation to weapons of mass destruction is not some invention of the British security services," Blair said. "There are 12 years of United Nations resolutions about the weapons of mass destruction found in Iraq."
NEWS
January 13, 2009
President George W. Bush, who for much of the last eight years engaged in long-range combat with critical media, spent an entertaining 45 minutes yesterday morning up close and personal with the White House press corps. It was an elliptical final encounter that skipped from serious issues to post-presidential musings such as how he would feel about making his wife's morning coffee. No shoes were thrown as Mr. Bush cheerfully thanked the journalists for their service, aggressively defended many controversial decisions, admitted a number of tactical errors, complained that reporters had "misunderappreciated" him, and cautioned President-elect Barack Obama against self-pity or neglecting defense of the nation against a possible terrorist attack.
NEWS
By Thomas F. Schaller | December 30, 2008
The Bush family devised a simple, numerical means to distinguish between the presidencies of father and son: George H.W. Bush was called "41," and George W. Bush became "43." To mark the imminent - and merciful - end of 43's reign, here are 43 remembrances of the departing administration. There were actions to pacify or mobilize the right-wing elements that brought Mr. Bush to power: 43. Restoring the so-called Mexico City policy prohibiting American aid to groups that provide abortion counseling in other countries.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.