Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMashed Potatoes
IN THE NEWS

Mashed Potatoes

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Maria Hiaasen | April 2, 1997
What you get: 6.6 ounces (9 servings)Cost: $1.09Tlme to prepare: 3 1/2 minutes to microwave 4 servings; about 5 minutes stove-top.Review: I still view instant mashed potatoes as space-aged food, something probably developed for the Apollo missions. But new flavors like garlic and sour cream and chives lured me to my grocer's display. I like Hungry Jack's convenience: They mix the flavoring with the potato flakes, then pack them loosely into the box, so you can prepare as much as you'd like at a time.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman
For The Baltimore Sun
| September 24, 2013
Kathy Blair from Somerset, Ky., was looking for a recipe she had clipped from a magazine years ago and has since lost for an unusual meatloaf. She said this meatloaf mixture was rolled out flat; mashed potatoes and chopped celery leaves were spread over the mixture and then it was rolled up jellyroll-style. It was then baked and when cooled slightly it could be sliced and the slices resembled pinwheels. I located a recipe on a food blog called DiaryofaCraftyCook.com that sounded very similar to what Blair had described.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | November 18, 1998
* Item: Inland Valley Homestyle Mashed Potatoes* What you get: 4 servings* Cost: About $2.50* Preparation time: 10 to 14 minutes microwaved, 51 to 62 minutes in the oven* Review: A reader sent a rave review of these frozen mashed potatoes after we published a positive review of another brand last fall. "You'll love them," she promised. And she was right. We tried Inland Valley's plain and seasoned versions. Both taste better than instant potatoes and are easier to make. Just pop the tray in a conventional or microwave oven, heat and serve.
FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard,
For The Baltimore Sun
| July 29, 2013
Chef and cooking instructor Nikki McGowan spices up traditional shepherd's pie with kid-friendly Mexican seasonings. The pie is simple enough for kids to help cook, too. During the busy school year, McGowan suggests prepping the pie (with the help of the kids) on Sunday, so it's ready to “pop into the oven on a crazy night of homework and after-school activities.” She recommends serving the pie with hot sauce and tortilla chips. “Kids can eat it by scooping it up with the chips,” she says.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 2, 1996
Mashed potatoes, Mother Nature's great comfort food, are suddenly back in style. Their recent return to restaurant menus, decked out in trendy seasoning combinations, could be your cue to get creative at home.Today's zesty, trimmed-down versions can save you 100 calories per one-cup serving over the classic whipped-with-butter-and-half-and-half kind. The mouth-watering flavors and down-home comfort of "'90s mashed" arise from spices, herbs, garlic and horseradish that deliciously make up for trimming the fat.Potatoes are a rich source of fat-free complex carbohydrates.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2002
Delores Philipp of La Pine, Ore., requested a recipe she saw in The Bend Bulletin in Bend, Ore. It was for mashed potatoes that "could be frozen and which contained cream cheese. We can't find the recipe and hope you can help us." Paige Lutz of Abingdon responded. "I am known as the `mashed potato queen' because of my love for mashed potatoes. A co-worker made this dish and brought it in for me for lunch one day. It is delicious. She gave me this recipe, and I hope that it may be the one that Delores Philipp is seeking."
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | December 14, 1997
In many ways Tapestry -- formerly Tomcat Alley -- is very much like other Fells Point restaurants. The setting, particularly the bar, has lots of funky charm. (In fact, after this review, critics should be banned from ever using that phrase to describe a Fells Point bar-restaurant again.) The narrow dining room is appealing, although it won't sound like it when I describe the color scheme as acorn-squash yellow and dark green.On a Sunday night, with every table taken, there's one waiter and one cook.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | February 15, 1995
Man cannot live by fancy food alone. The craving for a solid homecooked meal will sometimes overcome. Nothing fills that longing like a hearty meatloaf.This rib-sticking recipe piles the meat and potatoes together in one delicious round, streamlining the traditional meatloaf in time and calories. The microwave cuts the cooking time by about 75 percent and the result is a fabulous, moist savory cake of flavorful meatloaf sandwiching a thick layer of mashed potatoes.A food processor makes fast work of this, but if you don't have one use some convenience products such as pregrated carrots from the salad bar.Store-bought refrigerated mashed potatoes also save time and are quite good, even straight from the package.
NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,[Sun reporter] | January 31, 2007
Trinidad Gourmet 418 E. 31st St. -- 410-243-0072 Hours --7 a.m.-8:30 p.m. Mondays-Saturdays Restaurant's estimate --5 minutes Ready in --16 minutes BEST BITE The stewed oxtail with rice and peas, $10.49, was almost too much food for one person. We ordered a side of mashed pumpkin, which was deliciously rich. A large mound of rice and peas and a couple of slices of plantain also accompanied the meat. BEST BARGAIN With cooked spinach, green beans and pumpkin covering mashed potatoes and chickpeas, the vegetarian roti, $6.30, was a solid deal.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff Writer | March 22, 1995
When it comes to comfort, you can't beat mashed potatoes. But are they chic, trendy, all the rage?You bet they are, at least in the restaurants where this down-home staple is taking on some '90s polish, paired with the likes of roasted garlic, saffron, kalamata olives, truffles, and chives.Why the new passion for such an old-fashioned dish? "I think it's a return of comfort food -- with a twist to it," said restaurateur Susan Daniel, owner of Tabrizi's in Federal Hill, noting that the desire for comfort seems to be a general social trend.
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | December 29, 2011
Holiday parties are just a fancy cover, and traditional family dinners are simply an excuse. The truth is, all we want to do at this time of year is … eat. Winter days are shorter and colder, and the sunlight is weak. So is our will, and nothing fills that hole in the psyche like mom's meatloaf and scalloped potatoes. Or a slab of lasagna the size of a brick. Or a serving of spaghetti that would fill a garbage can lid. Carbs and home cookin' are feel-good foods. They either trigger the release of the feel-good hormone serotonin in the brain or they can bring back memories of happier times, when life was less complicated or sad. That's one explanation anyway.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jasmine Wiggins | March 9, 2011
Right around Valentine's Day I was searching for a recipe for mashed potatoes. I had never made them before. I know, I think that makes me part-alien or something. I decided to make them as part of a Valentine’s dinner for the boyfriend, who could probably eat mashed potatoes everyday. I came across this recipe over at Martha Stewart , only there was one thing missing from the recipe: the quantity of potatoes. I still liked the idea and decided to use it for inspiration.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE | March 25, 2009
The general consensus on Dining@Large was that potatoes would be the way to go in honor of St. Patrick's Day last Tuesday, so here's a list of the best potato dishes I've had in recent memory in area restaurants. Note: The list is in alphabetical order: 1 Crisp, salty house-made chips at Abbey Burger Bistro in Federal Hill 2 Truffle potatoes at Crush in Belvedere Square 3 Frites with parsley, minced garlic and lemon zest at the Grill at Harryman House in Reisterstown 4 The golden wedge of potatoes au gratin, creamy and rich, at Henninger's Tavern in Upper Fells Point 5 Fingerling potato salad with dill at Ixia in Mount Vernon 6 Mashed potatoes with butter and cream at Lucy's Irish Pub near Lexington Market 7 The potato puree finished with brown butter at Pazo in Harbor East 8 Lobster, bacon and potato hash at Peter's Inn in Fells Point 9 Greenberg potato skins at the Prime Rib (downtown north)
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | November 7, 2007
The sweet potato is an often-neglected spud, regularly pushed out of the culinary limelight by mashed potatoes, its renown not even close to that of the famous french fry. The sweet potato did not help its reputation when, for prior years, it regularly showed up at the supper table, tarted up, dotted with marshmallows and calling itself "candied." There was also the problem of being orange, not a fetching color. Despite these limitations, the sweet potato is, I think, a food this fella could fall for. The sweet potato happens to be a favorite of Deborah Madison.
NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,[Sun reporter] | January 31, 2007
Trinidad Gourmet 418 E. 31st St. -- 410-243-0072 Hours --7 a.m.-8:30 p.m. Mondays-Saturdays Restaurant's estimate --5 minutes Ready in --16 minutes BEST BITE The stewed oxtail with rice and peas, $10.49, was almost too much food for one person. We ordered a side of mashed pumpkin, which was deliciously rich. A large mound of rice and peas and a couple of slices of plantain also accompanied the meat. BEST BARGAIN With cooked spinach, green beans and pumpkin covering mashed potatoes and chickpeas, the vegetarian roti, $6.30, was a solid deal.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | November 24, 2006
Propped up on her aunt's lap, 1--year-old Kayla Boblett was in heaven when she dipped her tiny fingers into a pool of mashed potatoes, retrieved a sufficient glob and stuck it into her mouth. She then used her fork to spear a chuck of gravy-soaked turkey. She was in her own world and wasn't paying attention to the hundreds of people around her eating, serving up meals and giving thanks yesterday at the annual Bea Gaddy Thanksgiving dinner at the Patterson Park Recreation Center. "Mashed potatoes, that's her favorite," said her aunt Donna White of Dundalk.
NEWS
By DONNA PIERCE and DONNA PIERCE,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 26, 2006
Which potato makes the best mashed potatoes? Yukon golds or russets? In On Cooking: Techniques From Expert Chefs, a reference book often used in culinary schools, the authors call for waxy potatoes. In The America's Test Kitchen Cookbook, from the editors of Cook's Illustrated magazine, the authors cite the assets of both. "Russet potatoes make fluffier mashed potatoes," they write. "But Yukon golds have an appealing buttery flavor." So we weren't surprised when our own unofficial tasting yielded much the same results.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,sun staff | May 24, 1998
RESTON, Va. - It ain't over until the Lunch Lady sings.Gooood morning or good afternoon! begins the Lunch Lady, whose Grand Ol' Opryish voice can be heard weekdays on a phone recording hailing from a government cafeteria here in Northern Virginia.Today the soup of the day will be beef barley. For the "Market Carver," we are going to feature chicken piccata, and for the "Balance Choice Option," linguine, with broccoli, peppers and carrots ...For lo these five years, the Lunch Lady has been a cult figure around Washington - and way beyond.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Sun Reporter | November 19, 2006
Kathy Brown said the meal wouldn't be complete without mashed potatoes, gravy and stuffing. "You have to have mashed potatoes, and they want that homemade gravy and stuffing, just like you do at home with the celery and onions," said Brown, director of the Shepherd's Staff, a Westminster-based ecumenical ministry. She admitted, however, that the mashed potatoes are now boxed, rather than freshly peeled tubers. "We do everything like homemade, except the potatoes - it was just too much," she said.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | July 16, 2006
There was a time I refused to discuss chains. If I did that now, half the restaurants that survive and flourish in Baltimore would never get reviewed by me. Not to mention the fact that these days they often have better food, better service and better prices than comparable locally owned places -- much as it pains me to admit it. If nothing else, the well-known chains have a better chance of surviving in spots where others have failed. Case in point, the pleasant but out-of-the-way space behind the Power Plant on Pier 4. A Houlihan's recently opened there and seems to be doing well, and my guess is the name recognition factor (the chain has been around since the early '70s)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.