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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | June 9, 2002
WASHINGTON - The photograph was taken in the first breathless hours after the Sept. 11 attack. Someone in some far-flung outpost of Islamic radicalism had scrawled a sign and held it up for a photographer's camera. The message asked Americans to think about why they are hated all over the world. I suppose it was intended to make Americans who saw it uneasy or uncertain. The only thing it ever made me was angry. Not that the sentiment was unique. To the contrary, it repeatedly popped up in my e-mail and on various editorial pages.
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EXPLORE
July 20, 2011
Kenya is calling Gina Pierleoni. The invitation is out for everyone to meet and greet the Bel Air artist Saturday night, July 23, and, by the way, to enjoy an evening of live entertainment, silent auctions and raffles. The goal is to raise money to help send Gina to Kenya in October for two weeks, where she'll do a workshop and service work with members of the Masai tribe. It is the second year for the venture, which is named Kenya Calling. The benefit is from 7 p.m. until 11 at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Church at 2515 Churchville Road in Bel Air. Admission is free.
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NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,Sun foreign reporter | March 2, 2008
ARUSHA, Tanzania -- One night when Neema Laizer was 14, her father announced that she had to go live with her new husband and his two wives the next day. Nobody asked the seventh-grader how she felt; it did not matter. But Neema, sensing her life was about to end, refused to submit. With help from her courageous mother and an uncle who was a priest, she fled her family's rural compound that night. Driven over bad roads to this city near Mount Kilimanjaro, she ended up at a center that places girls in schools and keeps them safe from forced marriage.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,Sun foreign reporter | March 2, 2008
ARUSHA, Tanzania -- One night when Neema Laizer was 14, her father announced that she had to go live with her new husband and his two wives the next day. Nobody asked the seventh-grader how she felt; it did not matter. But Neema, sensing her life was about to end, refused to submit. With help from her courageous mother and an uncle who was a priest, she fled her family's rural compound that night. Driven over bad roads to this city near Mount Kilimanjaro, she ended up at a center that places girls in schools and keeps them safe from forced marriage.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 2, 1997
Eighth-grade students at North Carroll Middle School have had a textbook view of Africa, but Friday they studied the continent through the tales of a Masai tribesman.Moses Olesakuda, whose formal name is "longer than a sentence," delighted his young audience with tales of fearsome lion hunts, charging buffalo and powerful snakes. The students saw the sword Olesakuda used to slay a lion, a rite of passage for boys about their age."Killing a lion is like getting a degree in our culture," Olesakuda said.
NEWS
October 20, 1994
Stefan Martin, 58, an artist noted for his wood engravings, drowned Oct. 7 in Assunpink Lake in Millstone Township, N.J. He lived in Roosevelt, N.J. He was in a rowboat that apparently capsized, said his brother, Tony Martin of Brooklyn, N.Y.Dakari Hru, 42, a poet and an author of children's books, died Aug. 31 at Cabrini Medical Center in Manhattan after a brief illness. His first picture book, "Joshua's Masai Mask," published in 1993, was described as "splendidly universal" in a review in the New York Times.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff writer | October 23, 1991
Richard Frye Diggs will come out of Africa with a title and a few more relatives.The 80-year-old man returns to his Westminster home this weekend, as an honorary member of the Masai, a tribal people living in East Africa.Diggs said he doesn't know in which country his African ancestorslived originally. The Rev. Paul Maxey, who traveled to Kenya with Diggs and Phillip Hooks on a mission of mercy, decided to help his friend acquire some roots.At Maxey's request, a Masai chief installedDiggs as a member of his village, situated in Amboselli National Park along the border of Kenya and Ethiopia.
NEWS
October 11, 2002
McDaniel College to present `Music from Latin America' Chamber Music on the Hill at McDaniel College will present "Music from Latin America" at 7 p.m. Sunday on the Alumni Hall main stage. The concert will feature McDaniel College faculty David Duree, Don Horneff, Linda Kirkpatrick, David Kreider, Lynne Griffith and Peggy Ward. Elizabeth Lee, Julie Gregorian, Phanos Dymiotis, Thomas Mitchell and Mindy Niles also will perform. The McDaniel College Madrigal Singers, directed by Margaret Boudreaux, will perform.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,Contributing Writer | November 18, 1992
Four people stepped along the slim beam of Rebecca Harman's flashlight tracing the narrow path. Thousands of miles from her hometown of New Windsor, Mrs. Harman led her group downhill to their camp. It was night at the foot of Mount Kenya, in safari country."Don't look now," she whispered, tapping her friend Dotty on the shoulder, "but there's a Masai warrior behind me."The Masai, stretching 7 feet tall, held a war club in one hand, a spear in the other. A red sash was draped across his chest.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | September 28, 2003
A Memorable Place Toronto rises above SARS worries By Evan Balkan SPECIAL TO THE SUN Five years ago, my wife and I spent a wonderful honeymoon in the Canadian Maritimes. When our five-year anniversary neared, we decided to spend a long weekend away, the best our schedules would allow. It seemed appropriate to return to Canada, where things are generally clean, efficient and civil -- and where Americans enjoy the spoils of a great exchange rate. We chose to go to Niagara Falls and Toronto.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | October 17, 2004
A Memorable Place The pleasures and pains of Africa By David Berry SPECIAL TO THE SUN The first thing you notice in Africa are the smells. In Nairobi, Kenya, it is the smell of walking dusty paths along city streets choked with fumes from poorly tuned, oil-burning cars and trucks. It is the smell of corn roasting over open charcoal fires. Even in the best neighborhoods, it is the smell of trash burning along the roads. It is the smell of poverty so overwhelming that the average American has no frame of reference.
NEWS
October 11, 2002
McDaniel College to present `Music from Latin America' Chamber Music on the Hill at McDaniel College will present "Music from Latin America" at 7 p.m. Sunday on the Alumni Hall main stage. The concert will feature McDaniel College faculty David Duree, Don Horneff, Linda Kirkpatrick, David Kreider, Lynne Griffith and Peggy Ward. Elizabeth Lee, Julie Gregorian, Phanos Dymiotis, Thomas Mitchell and Mindy Niles also will perform. The McDaniel College Madrigal Singers, directed by Margaret Boudreaux, will perform.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | June 9, 2002
WASHINGTON - The photograph was taken in the first breathless hours after the Sept. 11 attack. Someone in some far-flung outpost of Islamic radicalism had scrawled a sign and held it up for a photographer's camera. The message asked Americans to think about why they are hated all over the world. I suppose it was intended to make Americans who saw it uneasy or uncertain. The only thing it ever made me was angry. Not that the sentiment was unique. To the contrary, it repeatedly popped up in my e-mail and on various editorial pages.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 2, 1997
Eighth-grade students at North Carroll Middle School have had a textbook view of Africa, but Friday they studied the continent through the tales of a Masai tribesman.Moses Olesakuda, whose formal name is "longer than a sentence," delighted his young audience with tales of fearsome lion hunts, charging buffalo and powerful snakes. The students saw the sword Olesakuda used to slay a lion, a rite of passage for boys about their age."Killing a lion is like getting a degree in our culture," Olesakuda said.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Sun Staff Correspondent | April 2, 1995
Masai Mara Game Reserve, Kenya -- Nature has provided few more spectacular stages for its incessant drama than these open plains on the southern edge of Kenya.That drama takes many forms, the touching interplay between elephant mother and child, the graceful dance of a lithe gazelle, the amusing antics of a bodacious baboon.But never is it more acute and demanding than when it is the life-and-death struggle between predator and prey. It was in the hopes of seeing that most spectacular of an African game reserve's shows that we had parked our Land Rover 100 yards or so away from a cheetah.
NEWS
October 20, 1994
Stefan Martin, 58, an artist noted for his wood engravings, drowned Oct. 7 in Assunpink Lake in Millstone Township, N.J. He lived in Roosevelt, N.J. He was in a rowboat that apparently capsized, said his brother, Tony Martin of Brooklyn, N.Y.Dakari Hru, 42, a poet and an author of children's books, died Aug. 31 at Cabrini Medical Center in Manhattan after a brief illness. His first picture book, "Joshua's Masai Mask," published in 1993, was described as "splendidly universal" in a review in the New York Times.
EXPLORE
July 20, 2011
Kenya is calling Gina Pierleoni. The invitation is out for everyone to meet and greet the Bel Air artist Saturday night, July 23, and, by the way, to enjoy an evening of live entertainment, silent auctions and raffles. The goal is to raise money to help send Gina to Kenya in October for two weeks, where she'll do a workshop and service work with members of the Masai tribe. It is the second year for the venture, which is named Kenya Calling. The benefit is from 7 p.m. until 11 at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Church at 2515 Churchville Road in Bel Air. Admission is free.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,Contributing Writer | November 18, 1992
Four people stepped along the slim beam of Rebecca Harman's flashlight tracing the narrow path. Thousands of miles from her hometown of New Windsor, Mrs. Harman led her group downhill to their camp. It was night at the foot of Mount Kenya, in safari country."Don't look now," she whispered, tapping her friend Dotty on the shoulder, "but there's a Masai warrior behind me."The Masai, stretching 7 feet tall, held a war club in one hand, a spear in the other. A red sash was draped across his chest.
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