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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2011
A leggy baby gazelle is the newest part of the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore. The addra gazelle calf, named Elvira, was born the morning of October 30. The healthy baby weighed 11 pounds. Her parents are Pearl, who's 9, and Makuru, who's four. But because Pearl is showing no interest in Elvira, zoo staff has decided to hand-raise her. Peal gave birth to another calf, Ray-Ray, earlier this year.  “Because the calf is so significant to the overall population of this endangered species, we decided that a quick intervention was necessary in order to keep her healthy,"  Mike McClure, general curator of the Zoo, said in a statement.
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By Donald P. Hutchinson | October 9, 2014
In the past (almost) seven years since I came to the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore as president and CEO, I've said many times that the zoo is a place full of life and stories - funny stories, sad stories, public stories and private stories. Judging from the comments I have been getting from visitors lately, stories about all of the new exhibits at the zoo - including the recently opened Penguin Coast - may be some of the best stories yet. In 2008, it was widely reported that we were at a critical juncture at the zoo - and that was true then.
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NEWS
December 6, 2012
I was utterly thrilled by your story about the new animals arriving at the zoo ("Maryland Zoo welcomes new lioness, giraffe," Dec. 3). However, I wish there had been as much in the article about the lioness, such as her age and weight, as there was about the giraffe. For a while, I have been going to the National Zoo in Washington because I felt that the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore was not doing anything new. it was the same-old, same-old that I've seen since I was little. However, with the new animals arriving I will be going to the Maryland Zoo once more.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Morgan Eichensehr and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Maryland Zoo in Baltimore zookeeper Crystal Duff, 31, is asked all the time whether penguins would make good pets. Her answer is "no. " "They look super cute and cuddly, but they're not the nicest birds," said Duff, who lives in Perry Hall and has worked at the zoo since 2009. Duff has experienced a few penguin bites, but still really likes her job. At the newly unveiled Penguin Coast exhibit, she not only watches over the 54 endangered African penguins, she cleans up after them.
FEATURES
By Rebecca Hyler, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2012
A chimpanzee, born yesterday around 9:45 a.m. at The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore, has died, Zoo officials announced today. The baby chimp was born to Joice (pictured), the matriarch of the Zoo's chimpanzees. "During overnight checks, the keeper staff noticed that the baby didn't appear to be nursing and was becoming lethargic," stated Mike McClure, general curator at The Maryland Zoo, in a press release. "We then determined that the baby had died sometime early this morning. " The cause of death will not be determined for several weeks.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2014
The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore had been tracking the migration of North American snowy owls to evaluate their health when one was found injured in Maryland last month. The Department of Natural Resources brought the owl, which had a "severe wing droop and couldn't fly," to the zoo for treatment. After a surgery on its broken wing, the owl is in recovery and eating reliably, as documented in a video (above) detailing the owl's rehabilitation. The zoo's research on the birds is studying an increase in snowy owls in the U.S. that resulted from an irruption in the Arctic's snowy owl population.
FEATURES
By Rachel Martin and The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2012
The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore now welcomes Oscar, Niles and Sandy from their winter home in North Carolina. Visitors to the zoo can take an exhilarating ride on one of Maryland's summer resident camels. Until July 31 and throughout the month of September, guests can visit and ride 12-year-old Oscar, who is a 2,800 pound Bactrian camel, or 11-year-old Niles, a Dromedary camel who is almost eight feet tall. Sandy, who is three and a half, is too young to take riders but will be joining Oscar and Niles for some summer fun in between the Rock Island penguin exhibit and the Elephant Overlook.
NEWS
November 18, 2009
Former Baltimore County Executive Donald P. Hutchinson has agreed to stay on as president and CEO of the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore, dropping the "interim" designation he has held since being hired in 2007. Hutchinson, 63, took the post with a 15-month mandate to straighten out the zoo's finances and help find his permanent replacement. "We are so pleased that he is having so much fun running the zoo that both he and the board have decided to extend his tenure," said zoo Chairman Eric Orlinsky.
FEATURES
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2013
"Alaska," a Maryland Zoo polar bear that had been rescued from a Mexican circus a decade ago, was euthanized Tuesday after suffering from kidney failure, zoo officials said. The female bear had been confiscated in Puerto Rico by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service agents in March 2002 after the circus abandoned her there. When she arrived at the zoo soon after, animal keepers found that she was deaf, overweight and had poor muscle tone, but they nursed her to health and developed a training program using hand signals and other visual cues.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2013
Alaska, a Maryland Zoo polar bear that had been rescued from a Mexican circus a decade ago, was euthanized Tuesday after suffering kidney failure, zoo officials said. The bear had been confiscated in Puerto Rico by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service agents in March 2002 after the circus abandoned her there. When she arrived at the zoo soon after, animal keepers found that she was deaf, overweight and had poor muscle tone, but they nursed her to health and developed a training program using hand signals and other visual cues.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Angel, an aging 17-year-old giraffe born and raised at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore , was euthanized Tuesday, officials said. Angel long struggled with leg and back pain, which worsened recently, Dr. Ellen Bronson, the zoo's chief veterinarian, said in a statement. "While we were able to provide her with pain medicine which made her more comfortable, we realized that her quality of life was declining and the decision was made to euthanize her," Bronson said. She is the fourth older female giraffe to die at the zoo since 2008.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
The Maryland Zoo opened its first new major exhibit in a decade on Saturday, pinning its hopes on the endangered African penguin to spark a renaissance for the beleaguered institution. The new, $11 million Penguin Coast is now one of the first things visitors see after taking a shuttle to the park's exhibits. A small island designed to mimic a makeshift South African fishing camp sits in the center of a ring of water, so the penguins can swim in circles past an enclosed underwater viewing area.
FEATURES
By Kristine Henry
The Baltimore Sun
| September 15, 2014
What would it take to get you to pose like a penguin and share it for everyone on the interwebs to see? It's worth contemplating because the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore is celebrating the opening of its new Penguin Coast -- which will let visitors get more up close and personal with the penguins -- with a promotion that will culminate with one person winning a lifetime family membership to the zoo. The "Penguins for Life" contest runs today through...
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
Devin Cook's community college lacrosse coach said that the 20-year-old, a business major who was active in lacrosse leagues around the city, wanted to use sports as a way of getting a scholarship and completing college. He had recently earned enough - he worked two jobs - to buy a car and was taking his fellow lacrosse players at the Community College of Baltimore County home after a game last Thursday night. They were stopped in the car on Wilern Avenue in Park Heights when a gunman killed Mr. Cook and wounded his passenger, a fellow lacrosse player.
NEWS
By Will Fesperman, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
A zoo menagerie - including a parrot, a boa constrictor and an African pygmy hedgehog - greeted 5-year-old Finn Seamans of Odenton on Wednesday when he arrived at a courtyard between two office buildings in Elkridge. But the animals, provided by the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore , were only a preview of coming attractions. This month, Finn and his parents leave for a trip to California's wine country to admire giraffes and wildebeests at an African-style preserve, thanks to Make-A-Wish Mid-Atlantic.
FEATURES
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2014
Will it be Scout? Sioux? Vega? The first bald eagle to land at Baltimore's zoo in a decade is finishing a mandatory quarantine and preparing to meet visitors for the first time later this month. But first, the female bald eagle needs a name. Zoo keepers at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore have come up with five possibilities and want the public's help picking one through an online poll. The eagle, which came from the National Aviary in Pittsburgh, currently has just a species name - Haliaeetus leucocephalus, which in Latin means "sea eagle with white head.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2014
The Maryland Zoo is calling all birds of a feather to help name its new bald eagle. The contest, which opened on Independence Day and runs through July 14, is asking the public to name its newest avian resident, a female eagle found in North Carolina in 2009 that is estimated to be about 5-years-old. Though efforts were made to rehabilitate the bird, it was determined that she wouldn't be likely to survive if released back into the wild, according to the zoo's website. The zoo's staff previously selected five finalists: Annie (for gunfighter Annie Oakley)
NEWS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore announced Wednesday that it will no longer permit visitors to smoke on its grounds beginning July 1. The zoo said that it will ask visitors to leave the grounds to smoke or use tobacco products, including e-cigarettes. The zoo had previously prohibited smoking inside buildings under the Clean Indoor Air Act of Maryland, which was passed in 2007. The zoo's decision comes after the City Council voted this year to ban smoking near playgrounds, swimming pools and ball fields.
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