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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2011
A leggy baby gazelle is the newest part of the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore. The addra gazelle calf, named Elvira, was born the morning of October 30. The healthy baby weighed 11 pounds. Her parents are Pearl, who's 9, and Makuru, who's four. But because Pearl is showing no interest in Elvira, zoo staff has decided to hand-raise her. Peal gave birth to another calf, Ray-Ray, earlier this year.  “Because the calf is so significant to the overall population of this endangered species, we decided that a quick intervention was necessary in order to keep her healthy,"  Mike McClure, general curator of the Zoo, said in a statement.
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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
Devin Cook's community college lacrosse coach said that the 20-year-old, a business major who was active in lacrosse leagues around the city, wanted to use sports as a way of getting a scholarship and completing college. He had recently earned enough - he worked two jobs - to buy a car and was taking his fellow lacrosse players at the Community College of Baltimore County home after a game last Thursday night. They were stopped in the car on Wilern Avenue in Park Heights when a gunman killed Mr. Cook and wounded his passenger, a fellow lacrosse player.
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By Krishana Davis and The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2012
Bunny, a 22-year-old chimpanzee at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore, gave birth to a stillborn baby Thursday, the Zoo announced today. The Zoo's chimpanzees were given "mourning time" with the stillborn baby, according to Zoo officials. "This was Bunny's first pregnancy and things seemed very normal up to and including her last ultrasound earlier this week. At this time, we do not know what caused the infant to be stillborn," said Meredith Wagoner, mammal collection and conservation manager for the Zoo, in a press release.
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By Will Fesperman, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
A zoo menagerie - including a parrot, a boa constrictor and an African pygmy hedgehog - greeted 5-year-old Finn Seamans of Odenton on Wednesday when he arrived at a courtyard between two office buildings in Elkridge. But the animals, provided by the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore , were only a preview of coming attractions. This month, Finn and his parents leave for a trip to California's wine country to admire giraffes and wildebeests at an African-style preserve, thanks to Make-A-Wish Mid-Atlantic.
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December 6, 2012
I was utterly thrilled by your story about the new animals arriving at the zoo ("Maryland Zoo welcomes new lioness, giraffe," Dec. 3). However, I wish there had been as much in the article about the lioness, such as her age and weight, as there was about the giraffe. For a while, I have been going to the National Zoo in Washington because I felt that the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore was not doing anything new. it was the same-old, same-old that I've seen since I was little. However, with the new animals arriving I will be going to the Maryland Zoo once more.
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By Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2014
The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore had been tracking the migration of North American snowy owls to evaluate their health when one was found injured in Maryland last month. The Department of Natural Resources brought the owl, which had a "severe wing droop and couldn't fly," to the zoo for treatment. After a surgery on its broken wing, the owl is in recovery and eating reliably, as documented in a video (above) detailing the owl's rehabilitation. The zoo's research on the birds is studying an increase in snowy owls in the U.S. that resulted from an irruption in the Arctic's snowy owl population.
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By Rachel Martin and The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2012
The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore now welcomes Oscar, Niles and Sandy from their winter home in North Carolina. Visitors to the zoo can take an exhilarating ride on one of Maryland's summer resident camels. Until July 31 and throughout the month of September, guests can visit and ride 12-year-old Oscar, who is a 2,800 pound Bactrian camel, or 11-year-old Niles, a Dromedary camel who is almost eight feet tall. Sandy, who is three and a half, is too young to take riders but will be joining Oscar and Niles for some summer fun in between the Rock Island penguin exhibit and the Elephant Overlook.
NEWS
November 18, 2009
Former Baltimore County Executive Donald P. Hutchinson has agreed to stay on as president and CEO of the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore, dropping the "interim" designation he has held since being hired in 2007. Hutchinson, 63, took the post with a 15-month mandate to straighten out the zoo's finances and help find his permanent replacement. "We are so pleased that he is having so much fun running the zoo that both he and the board have decided to extend his tenure," said zoo Chairman Eric Orlinsky.
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By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2012
The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore has paid the majority of its $130,000 overdue water bill, city records show. Jane Ballentine, a spokeswoman for the zoo, alerted The Sun to the payment this weekend. "The checks have cleared, so we consider the water bill to be paid and our account current," she wrote in an email. City records show the zoo paid about $124,000 of the bill, and owes about $6,000. The zoo's overdue bill dated back to 2011 and officials said the non-profit, which receives funding from the state and city, had set up a payment plan with the city.
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By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2013
Alaska, a Maryland Zoo polar bear that had been rescued from a Mexican circus a decade ago, was euthanized Tuesday after suffering kidney failure, zoo officials said. The bear had been confiscated in Puerto Rico by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service agents in March 2002 after the circus abandoned her there. When she arrived at the zoo soon after, animal keepers found that she was deaf, overweight and had poor muscle tone, but they nursed her to health and developed a training program using hand signals and other visual cues.
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By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2014
Will it be Scout? Sioux? Vega? The first bald eagle to land at Baltimore's zoo in a decade is finishing a mandatory quarantine and preparing to meet visitors for the first time later this month. But first, the female bald eagle needs a name. Zoo keepers at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore have come up with five possibilities and want the public's help picking one through an online poll. The eagle, which came from the National Aviary in Pittsburgh, currently has just a species name - Haliaeetus leucocephalus, which in Latin means "sea eagle with white head.
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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2014
The Maryland Zoo is calling all birds of a feather to help name its new bald eagle. The contest, which opened on Independence Day and runs through July 14, is asking the public to name its newest avian resident, a female eagle found in North Carolina in 2009 that is estimated to be about 5-years-old. Though efforts were made to rehabilitate the bird, it was determined that she wouldn't be likely to survive if released back into the wild, according to the zoo's website. The zoo's staff previously selected five finalists: Annie (for gunfighter Annie Oakley)
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By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore announced Wednesday that it will no longer permit visitors to smoke on its grounds beginning July 1. The zoo said that it will ask visitors to leave the grounds to smoke or use tobacco products, including e-cigarettes. The zoo had previously prohibited smoking inside buildings under the Clean Indoor Air Act of Maryland, which was passed in 2007. The zoo's decision comes after the City Council voted this year to ban smoking near playgrounds, swimming pools and ball fields.
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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2014
Melvin Ray Harris, a longtime employee of the United States Information Agency whose love of the outdoors led to stints with the National Park Service and as a volunteer at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore and the National Aquarium, died May 24 at the University of Maryland Medical Center of complications from a stroke. He was 83. A native of Youngstown, Ohio, Mr. Harris moved with his family to Washington, D.C., when he was very young. Save for occasional periods, many while overseas working for the State Department and the USIA, he remained in Washington until moving to South Baltimore in 1990.
NEWS
May 21, 2014
Thank you for your coverage of this past weekend's Art Outside festival - a real gem of an event for everyone in Baltimore ("Art Outside returns to Druid Hill Park," May 16). My wholehearted congratulations to Barbara Shapiro and her team who succeeded (for the second year in a row) to bring together a true cross section of the community through a festival that not only celebrated visual and performing arts but also another gem of ours, Druid Hill Park. It was not lost on me, however, that many of the patrons of this event probably have not set foot in the park in many years - other than to come to this now-annual event or to visit The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore . Perhaps we can use the energy surrounding Art Outside to begin a region-wide discussion on how the park (and other beautiful spaces in the city)
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By Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2014
The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore had been tracking the migration of North American snowy owls to evaluate their health when one was found injured in Maryland last month. The Department of Natural Resources brought the owl, which had a "severe wing droop and couldn't fly," to the zoo for treatment. After a surgery on its broken wing, the owl is in recovery and eating reliably, as documented in a video (above) detailing the owl's rehabilitation. The zoo's research on the birds is studying an increase in snowy owls in the U.S. that resulted from an irruption in the Arctic's snowy owl population.
FEATURES
By Sean Welsh, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
Biologists from Maryland's Department of Natural Resources got to hold some cute bear cubs Monday. But it was more than just an opportunity to see the state's wildlife up close. DNR's Wildlife and Heritage Service used the winter check-up to "keep an eye on the size and health of Maryland's bruin population," said DNR spokeswoman Candus Thomson . Staff ventured into the woods Monday, while sows and bears were still located in their dens, Thomson said. The exercise allowed biologists "to change the batteries in radio collars worn by some sows and tag the new cubs with microchips, so they can be scanned in subsequent years without disturbing their hibernation.
FEATURES
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2014
Four lion cubs were born at the National Zoo in Washington on Sunday, less than two weeks after the first lion cubs born at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore made their public debut. The cubs, who have not yet been named, were born to 9-year-old African lion Shera after a seven-hour delivery, National Zoo officials said. The cubs and their mother appear to be healthy, and zoo staff are giving them space to bond. The litter was Shera's second and the fifth for the cubs' father, 8-year-old Luke.
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