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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2011
A leggy baby gazelle is the newest part of the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore. The addra gazelle calf, named Elvira, was born the morning of October 30. The healthy baby weighed 11 pounds. Her parents are Pearl, who's 9, and Makuru, who's four. But because Pearl is showing no interest in Elvira, zoo staff has decided to hand-raise her. Peal gave birth to another calf, Ray-Ray, earlier this year.  “Because the calf is so significant to the overall population of this endangered species, we decided that a quick intervention was necessary in order to keep her healthy,"  Mike McClure, general curator of the Zoo, said in a statement.
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By Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2014
The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore had been tracking the migration of North American snowy owls to evaluate their health when one was found injured in Maryland last month. The Department of Natural Resources brought the owl, which had a "severe wing droop and couldn't fly," to the zoo for treatment. After a surgery on its broken wing, the owl is in recovery and eating reliably, as documented in a video (above) detailing the owl's rehabilitation. The zoo's research on the birds is studying an increase in snowy owls in the U.S. that resulted from an irruption in the Arctic's snowy owl population.
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By Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2014
The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore had been tracking the migration of North American snowy owls to evaluate their health when one was found injured in Maryland last month. The Department of Natural Resources brought the owl, which had a "severe wing droop and couldn't fly," to the zoo for treatment. After a surgery on its broken wing, the owl is in recovery and eating reliably, as documented in a video (above) detailing the owl's rehabilitation. The zoo's research on the birds is studying an increase in snowy owls in the U.S. that resulted from an irruption in the Arctic's snowy owl population.
FEATURES
By Sean Welsh, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
Biologists from Maryland's Department of Natural Resources got to hold some cute bear cubs Monday. But it was more than just an opportunity to see the state's wildlife up close. DNR's Wildlife and Heritage Service used the winter check-up to "keep an eye on the size and health of Maryland's bruin population," said DNR spokeswoman Candus Thomson . Staff ventured into the woods Monday, while sows and bears were still located in their dens, Thomson said. The exercise allowed biologists "to change the batteries in radio collars worn by some sows and tag the new cubs with microchips, so they can be scanned in subsequent years without disturbing their hibernation.
NEWS
December 6, 2012
I was utterly thrilled by your story about the new animals arriving at the zoo ("Maryland Zoo welcomes new lioness, giraffe," Dec. 3). However, I wish there had been as much in the article about the lioness, such as her age and weight, as there was about the giraffe. For a while, I have been going to the National Zoo in Washington because I felt that the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore was not doing anything new. it was the same-old, same-old that I've seen since I was little. However, with the new animals arriving I will be going to the Maryland Zoo once more.
FEATURES
By Rebecca Hyler, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2012
A chimpanzee, born yesterday around 9:45 a.m. at The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore, has died, Zoo officials announced today. The baby chimp was born to Joice (pictured), the matriarch of the Zoo's chimpanzees. "During overnight checks, the keeper staff noticed that the baby didn't appear to be nursing and was becoming lethargic," stated Mike McClure, general curator at The Maryland Zoo, in a press release. "We then determined that the baby had died sometime early this morning. " The cause of death will not be determined for several weeks.
FEATURES
By Rachel Martin and The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2012
The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore now welcomes Oscar, Niles and Sandy from their winter home in North Carolina. Visitors to the zoo can take an exhilarating ride on one of Maryland's summer resident camels. Until July 31 and throughout the month of September, guests can visit and ride 12-year-old Oscar, who is a 2,800 pound Bactrian camel, or 11-year-old Niles, a Dromedary camel who is almost eight feet tall. Sandy, who is three and a half, is too young to take riders but will be joining Oscar and Niles for some summer fun in between the Rock Island penguin exhibit and the Elephant Overlook.
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By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2013
"Alaska," a Maryland Zoo polar bear that had been rescued from a Mexican circus a decade ago, was euthanized Tuesday after suffering from kidney failure, zoo officials said. The female bear had been confiscated in Puerto Rico by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service agents in March 2002 after the circus abandoned her there. When she arrived at the zoo soon after, animal keepers found that she was deaf, overweight and had poor muscle tone, but they nursed her to health and developed a training program using hand signals and other visual cues.
NEWS
November 18, 2009
Former Baltimore County Executive Donald P. Hutchinson has agreed to stay on as president and CEO of the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore, dropping the "interim" designation he has held since being hired in 2007. Hutchinson, 63, took the post with a 15-month mandate to straighten out the zoo's finances and help find his permanent replacement. "We are so pleased that he is having so much fun running the zoo that both he and the board have decided to extend his tenure," said zoo Chairman Eric Orlinsky.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2012
The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore has paid the majority of its $130,000 overdue water bill, city records show. Jane Ballentine, a spokeswoman for the zoo, alerted The Sun to the payment this weekend. "The checks have cleared, so we consider the water bill to be paid and our account current," she wrote in an email. City records show the zoo paid about $124,000 of the bill, and owes about $6,000. The zoo's overdue bill dated back to 2011 and officials said the non-profit, which receives funding from the state and city, had set up a payment plan with the city.
FEATURES
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2014
Four lion cubs were born at the National Zoo in Washington on Sunday, less than two weeks after the first lion cubs born at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore made their public debut. The cubs, who have not yet been named, were born to 9-year-old African lion Shera after a seven-hour delivery, National Zoo officials said. The cubs and their mother appear to be healthy, and zoo staff are giving them space to bond. The litter was Shera's second and the fifth for the cubs' father, 8-year-old Luke.
FEATURES
The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2014
We'll continue to update this list of cultural and commercial institutions shutting down or opening late. If you know of additional closings or delays, please note in the comments field. B&O Railroad Museum is closed. Baltimore County Public Library branches are closed. Charles Theatre is closed. Maryland Film Festival screenings for tonight at MICA ("It Felt Like Love") and AMC White Marsh ("Bad Words") are canceled. Maryland Zoo in Baltimore is closed.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2014
Snow was tapering off by late morning in Baltimore and points north and west, expected to end with 3-6 inches of accumulation around the region. A blast of cold air was meanwhile moving in behind the storm. Snowfall totals included 5.5 inches in Westminster, 5 inches in Owings Mills and Hunt Valley, 4.7 inches near Perry Hall and 4 inches near Columbia and in Northeast Baltimore's Hamilton neighborhood, according to the National Weather Service. Ice accumulated to as much as a tenth of an inch around the region overnight before precipitation turned to snow, according to the weather service.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2014
Little Luke and Leia, the first lion cubs ever born at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore , made their public debut Saturday, and thousands visited the zoo to see them. "There were a lot of gasps, and 'Oh my God, how cutes,'" said Jane Ballentine, a zoo spokeswoman. "I like to call it the big-smile reaction - people just pointing and smiling and laughing. " The cubs, given their Star Wars-inspired names by zoo visitors in a voting contest at the end of last year, were joined by Zuri, another lion cub brought to the Baltimore zoo from Miami.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2014
Officials at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore are investigating the death of a middle-aged female chimpanzee that was found lifeless in an enclosure early Wednesday morning, several hours after being anesthetized for a scheduled physical exam. Whether the anesthesia was a factor in the animal's death will be reviewed as part of a necropsy, or animal autopsy, zoo officials said. The 21-year-old primate, named Renee, was among the first group of chimpanzees to inhabit the zoo's Chimpanzee Forest following its opening in 1995.
FEATURES
By Kristine Henry,
The Baltimore Sun
| December 10, 2013
Here's a fun project for the kids: The two cute lion cubs at The Maryland Zoo are in need of names, and the zoo wants the public's input. The 9-week-old cubs, who lost their mother when she died from labor complications, are reported to be in good health. The zoo reports that: "The male cub has a lighter coat of fur and is more laid back, a pretty relaxed cub who likes to stay near his sister. The sister is covered in dark spots. She has a fiery personality, is always the first one to check out new things and she is the instigator in all of their lion-cub tussles.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2013
Carolyn Jacobi's broad-brimmed hat and cape stood out bright red against a gray afternoon recently at Rosa Bonheur Memorial Park in Elkridge, a combined pet and human cemetery, the latest stop in her 18-year national crusade for the buried dead and their loved ones. In a voice ringing with a preacher's passion, she told some three dozen people protesting possible development that she would fight to protect cemeteries "as long as God puts breath in my body, as long as I have a brain.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore announced the "bittersweet" news Thursday that its first-ever lion cubs had been born, but their mother had died of birth complications. Lioness Badu, just 31/2 years old, went into labor and gave birth to two cubs, a male and a female, last Thursday. When she showed signs of distress the next day during her attempt to deliver a third, the veterinary staff made the decision to perform a cesarean section. Two more cubs were delivered but neither survived.
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