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NEWS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | May 27, 1993
GAF Corp. said yesterday that it has settled with more than 8,500 Maryland plaintiffs who sued the company over injuries from asbestos products made by a GAF subsidiary.The settlement may mark a turning point toward resolution of the biggest consolidated asbestos case in the nation.The terms of the deal between the New Jersey-based chemical and building products conglomerate and the workers, most of whom were exposed to asbestos at Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s Sparrows Point steel mill, were not disclosed.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2014
Chesapeake Employers' Insurance Co. has some long-standing policyholders — 96 years, in one case. That happens when you date to the infancy of your industry. The Towson-based workers' compensation insurer — a century old this year — was created by Maryland legislators as they instituted a system to help injured employees and compensate the families of those who die in workplace accidents. States across the country were doing the same in rapid succession. Chesapeake Employers was called the State Accident Fund then, and it was a government agency.
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NEWS
By Dina ElBoghdady and Dina ElBoghdady,States News Service | June 17, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Two thousand Maryland workers have "LEAP-ed" into a brighter future, thanks to federal grants that support workplace literacy programs.Maryland's Labor Education Achievement Program (LEAP) is slated to receive $400,469 in July to fund the program's fourth year. With that money, LEAP hopes to help some 400 adults who lack high school-level reading, writing and math skills.The U.S. Department of Education yesterday awarded $19.2 million in grants to 55 workplace literacy programs in 30 states, including Maryland.
NEWS
March 1, 2014
As a peace activist, I am skeptical of the alleged cutbacks in military spending. I remember the "peace dividend" which never happened. Then I read "Pentagon cuts could affect Maryland" (Feb. 25). The article was misleading. Most economists will tell you that you can get more bang for the buck if tax dollars go instead to non-military investments such as Baltimore's infrastructure. For example, Maryland could really benefit if investments in renewable energy allow the state to slowly wean itself away from coal, gas and oil. Our Maryland senators and members of the House of Delegates must step up and support SB493/HB738, "Economic Development: Commission on Maryland's Future.
NEWS
By Jolene Ivey | December 9, 2013
Consider this scenario: A single mom's baby wakes up with a fever. She can either give him a dose of Tylenol, hoping it brings the baby's temperature down long enough to make it through her shift as a waitress, or stay home and miss a whole day's pay and not be able to afford rent or day care next week. She chooses the Tylenol, feeling guilty about it. Her son infects several other children at the day care, which sends him home. His mom has to miss work to care for him, then gets sick herself.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2012
Raquel Rojas has never worked for a company that gave her paid sick leave. Sometimes even unpaid leave isn't on offer. The Baltimore resident said a restaurant that employed her as a line cook three years ago stopped scheduling her for work after she stayed home for two weeks to recover from pneumonia. She said she had worked through worsening symptoms for several weeks — fever, mouth sores and eventually a bad cough — until she couldn't go on. "That happened to me, but also, not just to me," Rojas, 45, said through an interpreter.
NEWS
March 11, 2003
Dianna E. Farrell, former director of self-insurance for the Maryland Workers' Compensation Commission, died of cancer Saturday at Stella Maris Hospice at Mercy Medical Center. She was 56 and lived in Rosedale. Ms. Farrell was born and raised in Brooklyn, N.Y., and attended secretarial school after graduating from high school. Her work as a legal secretary and her activities in the Democratic Party in the 1960s brought her to the attention of Paul O'Dwyer, president of the New York City Council, who appointed her to his staff.
NEWS
November 3, 2011
I am no economic expert, but common sense suggests that if Constellation and Exelon merge, most if not all the consequences will be detrimental to Marylanders. Exelon would be buying Constellation, so when the number of workers is reduced - as always happens for cost-cutting reasons when mergers occur - Maryland workers will be the ones laid off. And does anyone doubt that electricity prices, especially in Maryland will go up? Anyone with eyes and ears must know that this will happen.
NEWS
June 6, 1999
Four students selected for scholarship programHoward Community College has announced the first recipients of a scholarship fund established by the Amerix Corp. of Columbia, the Amerix 21st Century Fund, to help low- and moderate-income students take job training courses.Winners are Luxie Gannon, Michele Williams and Linda Chiaverini of Columbia and Suzanne Sanders of Laurel.The women are enrolled in the college's Patient-Care Technician course, which prepares students to work in entry-level hospital positions.
NEWS
July 22, 2011
Your report using the figure of $220,000 for the "average sale price of a typical home" tells us nothing about what workers in relatively low-paying jobs can afford ("Housing costs out of reach for many Maryland workers," July 21). How about a more useful story about the difficulties ordinary people face in finding affordable housing? And stop using averages for housing costs and give us the median numbers. In the future, take the time to do a more in-depth look at your subject before publishing an alarming but not so useful article.
NEWS
Tim Wheeler | February 11, 2014
Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown will stand in for Gov. Martin O'Malley in making the administration's case to a House committee Tuesday for raising Maryland's minimum wage. O'Malley had been scheduled to testify before the House Economic Matters Committee , in one of his last appearances before the General Assembly.  But he will instead attend the funeral of Baltimore construction magnate and philanthropist Willard Hackerman , who died Monday at age 95. The House panel will hear from a bevy of supporters and opponents of increasing the state's lowest hourly pay rate in stages to $10.10 an hour by 2016.
NEWS
By Jolene Ivey | December 9, 2013
Consider this scenario: A single mom's baby wakes up with a fever. She can either give him a dose of Tylenol, hoping it brings the baby's temperature down long enough to make it through her shift as a waitress, or stay home and miss a whole day's pay and not be able to afford rent or day care next week. She chooses the Tylenol, feeling guilty about it. Her son infects several other children at the day care, which sends him home. His mom has to miss work to care for him, then gets sick herself.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2013
Though the federal government shutdown ended last week, the economic impact is likely to be felt in Maryland for months, dimming prospects for a robust holiday shopping season. With Congress funding the government only through Jan. 15 - raising the specter of another shutdown - some federal workers in Maryland plan to limit their holiday spending. Stores are bracing for more frugal customers. And financial experts are urging federal workers to start saving immediately. "To move the economy forward, we need a strong consumer.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2013
With the deadline to avoid a federal government shutdown looming, some of the thousands of Maryland workers who could be furloughed said they were frustrated at the impasse Sunday. U.S. Congress is deadlocked as Republicans in the House have sought to tie government spending bills to a measure that would put the new healthcare law on hold for a year. Without an agreement, agencies will furlough workers and cut back on services Tuesday. With some members of his congregation worried they may be furloughed in the coming week, the Rev. Emmett C. Burns Jr. tried to speak words of comfort from the pulpit at the Rising Sun First Baptist Church not far from the Social Security Administration in Woodlawn.
NEWS
September 16, 2013
While minimum wage laws may be becoming popular with power brokers in the Maryland legislature, they remain an example of a well-intentioned piece of public policy that will hurt Maryland workers far more than any benefits it may create (" Miller joins voices urging minimum wage hike Sept. 5). Minimum wage laws attempt to create a minimum standard of living to protect the health and well-being of employees by mandating a base level of pay that employers are required to pay certain covered employees.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2013
At an age when many workers are thinking about winding down their careers, Victoria Baldassano of Silver Spring says she can't afford to give retirement a thought. The part-time English professor at Montgomery College said her income has been too low for too long to save for retirement, and she's carrying about $40,000 in credit card debt racked up to pay living expenses. "It's an awkward situation to be in at 61," said Baldassano, who said she thinks more about day-to-day bills than retirement.
NEWS
January 18, 1991
Any misgivings about Westinghouse Corp.'s diversification moves were put to rest by Defense Secretary Dick Cheney's decision to ax the A-12, the Navy's medium-range carrier-based stealth bomber. Westinghouse, a major subcontractor on the $52 billion project, expects to idle as many as 1,200 Maryland workers once it gets final word from prime contractor General Dynamics. In the interim, the company is scrambling to reassign some of these workers to other jobs.Disastrous as it was, the cancellation didn't catch the big contractor flat-footed.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark | May 11, 1991
Kirschner Medical Corp. announced yesterday it would phase out one of its Maryland medical equipment manufacturing operations, sell its Timonium headquarters building and move its administrative staff into smaller nearby offices.C. Scott Harrison, chairman of the troubled medical products company, said yesterday that the 30-worker orthopedics production facility in Maryland would be closed and moved to Kirschner's Fairlawn, N.J. plant.Some Maryland workers at the plant, which finishes products such as artificial knees, will be offered positions at the New Jersey facility, he said.
NEWS
February 3, 2013
The latest report from the nonpartisan Economic Policy Institute makes a compelling case for raising the minimum wage, nationally and in Maryland. Legislation introduced last week in Annapolis would raise the minimum from $7.25 an hour to $10 in two years and keep it indexed to inflation - a move that EPI says will not only put $778 million more in the pockets of Maryland workers but create 4,280 new jobs from increased economic activity generated by the higher pay. We know that the reaction to many in the business community will be, as it has always been, unyielding opposition.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2013
An engineering, construction and technical services firm notified the state that it might lay off 31 employees next month, Maryland's Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation said Wednesday. California-based URS Corp. said possible layoffs could occur at its operations on MacArthur Road at Fort Meade and 430 National Business Parkway in Annapolis Junction. If layoffs happen, they would take effect at the close of business on Feb. 27 t h , the state said. The company declined to comment.
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