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By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2012
When the first Wine in the Woods festival was being planned in 1992, Ellicott City restaurateur Fernand Tersiguel suggested organizers add enlightenment to their goals for the event. This weekend, as the wine festival marks its 20th anniversary in Symphony Woods, the education seminars still attract a loyal following. But these are not the formal or snobby classes one might imagine. Instead, they are casual interactions among wine lovers. "You start tasting wine almost right away," said Larry Elletson, an Ellicott City resident and one of three co-directors of the Maryland chapter of Tasters Guild International.
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BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2013
Boordy Vineyards, Maryland's oldest and one of its largest wineries, has started over. Transforming the northern Baltimore County winery meant ripping up its grape-growing and winemaking operations literally root and branch, and rebuilding them at a cost of more than $3.3 million. "What we're doing is making a big investment in the future of making wine in Maryland," said Rob Deford, Boordy's president and co-owner, whose family will host a reception this week opening the new winemaking operation.
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FEATURES
By Jenn Williams and Jenn Williams,contributing writer | April 28, 1999
As he adjusts his wire-rimmed glasses, 24-year-old Kevin M. Atticks, a journalism teacher at Loyola College, says it is a rare Maryland wine that he would not recommend."
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2013
This could be the big summer of cider. We've fallen hard for the crisp dry hard ciders coming out of Millstone Cellars in Monkton, which are so refreshing for hot-weather dining. The Maryland Wineries will host Locapour - Drink Local , a tasting event at the Baltimore County Center for Maryland Agriculture and Farm Park on July 11 featuring five Maryland cider and mead producers. The event will include food vendors, live music and family activities. The participating wine producers are Great Shoals Winery (Princess Anne)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | November 6, 2003
California's Napa Valley may be wine country, but it's not the only region in America to boast great-tasting, award-winning vintages. Locally produced wines have been recognized at numerous national and international competitions, and the critical acclaim has begun to put the state's burgeoning wine business on the map. "It makes the larger wine crowd look to Maryland for good wines," said Kevin Atticks, spokesman for the Association of Maryland Wineries....
NEWS
March 7, 1999
Maryland Wine Festival for farm museumI wish to bring to your attention inaccuracies in your March 2 article "Restaurant Cash Trail May Lead to Costa Rica." The Maryland Wine Festival is not a Jerry Hardesty festival. It is a well-respected wine festival conducted by the Carroll County Farm Museum as a fund-raiser to help defray the operating costs of the museum.The Maryland Wine Festival receives the wholehearted support of the Association of Maryland Wineries. Virtually all Maryland wineries participate in the festival.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER | February 12, 2006
Kevin Atticks Occupation Executive director of the Maryland Wineries Association. In the News Atticks raised a protest last week after the state Comptroller's Office said it would cancel the state's 22 wineries' right to sell directly to retailers and restaurants. Atticks said the move could put many small wineries out of business. Career highlights He has been the association's executive director for three years. Previously, he was a faculty member at Loyola College, teaching communications, journalism, public relations and publishing.
NEWS
May 12, 1993
Call it a vintage case of sour grapes, this tiff between the Association of Maryland Wineries and Annapolis tavern owner Jerry Hardesty.The 10 vintners in the association are stomping-mad at Mr. Hardesty for using his capital connections to win passage of a General Assembly bill allowing him to invite out-of-state wineries to his yearly beer and wine bash. The vintners say this violates the spirit of 1984 legislation that created the Maryland Wine Festival as a promotional tool for Maryland's small but reputable wine industry.
NEWS
May 12, 1993
Call it a vintage case of sour grapes, this tiff between the Association of Maryland Wineries and Annapolis tavern owner Jerry Hardesty.The 10 vintners in the association, including three based in Mt. Airy, are stomping-mad at Mr. Hardesty for using his capital connections to win passage of a General Assembly bill allowing him to ask out-of-state wineries to his yearly beer and wine bash. The vintners say this violates the spirit of 1984 legislation that created the Maryland Wine Festival as a promotional tool for Maryland's small but reputable wine industry.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | March 11, 1992
Beer drinkers are different from wine drinkers. They even listen to different music, one man argued Monday in opposing a state measure that would allow Annapolis' annual wine festival to include beer.His remarks before the City Council prompted snickers from beer drinkers and micro-brewery owners in the crowd.Worried that the event would turn into a giant frat party on the banks of College Creek, Alderman John Hammond, R-Ward 1, introduced aresolution calling for the House bill to be withdrawn.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2012
John and Cindy Stevenson had the perfect set-up Saturday at the Maryland Wine Festival: topped-off glasses of vino, a cadre of friends and family, blankets and chairs spread out under a shade tree, crusty bread, caprese salad and two kinds of cheese. The Ellicott City wine connoisseurs were among thousands who attended the 29th annual event on the sprawling grounds of Carroll County Farm Museum in Westminster. The two-day event continues Sunday from noon to 6 p.m. The Stevensons said Napa Valley has nothing on Maryland's homegrown wines.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2012
When the first Wine in the Woods festival was being planned in 1992, Ellicott City restaurateur Fernand Tersiguel suggested organizers add enlightenment to their goals for the event. This weekend, as the wine festival marks its 20th anniversary in Symphony Woods, the education seminars still attract a loyal following. But these are not the formal or snobby classes one might imagine. Instead, they are casual interactions among wine lovers. "You start tasting wine almost right away," said Larry Elletson, an Ellicott City resident and one of three co-directors of the Maryland chapter of Tasters Guild International.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2011
Jessica Klug of Pasadena and nine members of her all-girls wine club sat on blankets and folding chairs under the trees in Symphony Woods at Merriweather Post Pavilion on Sunday, 10 half-empty bottles of wine in front of them. "One each," she said cheerfully. The women, who purchased another 10 bottles to take home, were pleased to learn that Maryland law will soon allow them to order wine directly from out-of-state wineries but were not happy about the tax increase imposed on state liquor sales that some wine drinkers say will hit them the hardest.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2011
A proposal to allow Maryland wine drinkers to get bottles shipped directly to their homes has won the approval of two key legislative committees. The Senate Education, Health and Environmental Matters Committee and the House Economic Matters Committee both voted overwhelmingly Tuesday to send the direct-ship proposal to the full legislature. The development bodes well for the legislation; in years past, those two committees have bottled up the plan, which is popular among consumers.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2010
If you can't make it to this weekend's Maryland Wine Festival, there are a few smaller wine events coming up — at either end of the state. Riverside WineFest at Sotterley This festival in St. Mary's County is the weekend of Oct. 2-3. It runs from noon to 6 p.m. on the grounds of Historic Sotterley, 44300 Sotterley Lane in Hollywood. There will be crafts, food, live music and children's activities. Tickets are $20 and good for unlimited tastings. For more information, go to sotterley.org.
NEWS
July 29, 2010
Within an hour's drive of Maryland are a pair of vending machines that dispense wine. They are believed to be the first of their kind in the country and, according to Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board officials, the two kiosks located in Harrisburg-area supermarkets have proved to be a smashing success since their June debut. In other words, a state that has long had liquor laws even more arcane than Maryland's (hard liquor in Pennsylvania is available by the bottle only in state-run stores, while beer distributors can only sell kegs and cases)
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2002
It's a great year for Maryland wineries. While grain farmers bemoan the damage to their corn and soybean crops from the prolonged drought, grape growers and winemakers are celebrating. "Dry weather, like this year, produces smaller grapes, but the flavor is more concentrated, they are sweeter and they make a better wine," said Rose Fiore, secretary and treasurer of Fiore Winery, near Pylesville in northern Harford County. "We will get less wine this year," she said, "but it will be a better quality."
NEWS
By TED ROUSE | February 26, 2006
The recent decision by the state comptroller's office to make it illegal for small Maryland wineries to sell directly to retailers and restaurants will have a devastating impact on as many as 17 of Maryland's 21 wineries, and many small wineries in the state will likely sell their farms. Small wineries can't afford having a middleman take a large chunk of their slim revenues. Losing more small farms will contribute further to the decline of the Chesapeake Bay and, ultimately, the health of those of us who live in this region.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | July 25, 2009
Baltimore County will build a $9 million agriculture center in Hunt Valley that will offer office and meeting space as well as classrooms, greenhouses and demonstration fields for groups now spread throughout the area. Officials said the Baltimore County Center for Maryland Agriculture, located on a 149-acre property just west of Interstate 83 on Shawan Road, will extend the county's commitment to farming. The county purchased the land from the Tillman family, which had operated a horse farm and boarding business there.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,sun reporter | March 8, 2008
A House of Delegates committee yesterday rejected a bill that would let Maryland consumers buy wine directly from Internet merchants and wineries, as is permitted in at least 35 other states. The bill was also debated yesterday in the Senate, though its chance of passage appears slim. Wine lovers and Maryland wineries have been battling the state's liquor distributors for several years over the issue. Under current law, online direct-to-consumer sales of alcohol are largely prohibited because they circumvent the "three tier" regulatory system in place that requires producers to sell to wholesalers, who distribute cases of wine to retail stores.
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