Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMaryland Waters
IN THE NEWS

Maryland Waters

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
Three people have died in Maryland waters in as many days, and a U.S. Coast Guard search is underway for another who went missing Monday, authorities said. The bodies of two boaters were found after their vessel encountered storms Sunday into Monday. After the body of Brigette Marchand, 42, of Annapolis, was found in the water off Brandon Shores on Monday, police initiated a search for her partner. Around 11:15 a.m. Tuesday near Fort Howard in Baltimore County, Natural Resources Police found the body of David Frandzen, 40, of Pasadena.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
Three people have died in Maryland waters in as many days, and a U.S. Coast Guard search is underway for another who went missing Monday, authorities said. The bodies of two boaters were found after their vessel encountered storms Sunday into Monday. After the body of Brigette Marchand, 42, of Annapolis, was found in the water off Brandon Shores on Monday, police initiated a search for her partner. Around 11:15 a.m. Tuesday near Fort Howard in Baltimore County, Natural Resources Police found the body of David Frandzen, 40, of Pasadena.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 29, 1991
The Department of Natural Resources has announced that "The Guide ToCruising Maryland Waters" is available for the 1991 boating season in the Chesapeake Bay.The guide is Maryland's marine atlas of all its tidal waters and features detailed insets of rivers and harbors. The guide is published every two years and is available at $18 a copy.The guide is available at the DNR Licensing center in Annapolis and at regional service centers across the state.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2013
Lifeguards, Cullin Brown will have you know, do not laze around beaches, lakes and pools. "There's a stereotype that we sit in the sun and tan," said Brown, a 19-year-old lifeguard at Rocky Gap State Park in Western Maryland. State park lifeguards train every day - running, swimming or practicing rescue skills, all of which Brown and about 75 other guards put on display Tuesday at Sandy Point State Park near Annapolis at the annual competition of lifeguards from every state park with a beach or pool.
NEWS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 14, 1991
ANNNAPOLIS -- The state announced yesterday that its annual survey of rockfish, or striped bass, had found subpar reproduction for the second straight year, but officials said they continue to believe the species is recovering in Maryland waters.The young-of-the-year index -- a mathematical measure of successful reproduction from the spring spawn -- for 1991 was 4.4, the state Department of Natural Resources reported. The average is 8.6. Officials attributed the below-average count to minimal rainfall and above-normal water temperatures from early May through the summer.
NEWS
April 12, 1993
The tragic boating deaths of two Cleveland Indians pitchers last month stand as a warning for Marylanders as their season on the Chesapeake Bay commences.Alcohol is increasingly a factor in boating accidents in Maryland waters, despite federal and state education efforts. Alcohol is now involved in more than half the fatal small-boat accidents on Maryland waters, double the proportion of alcohol-related fatalities on state highways. Alcohol and gasoline don't mix, and the combination is even more deadly on the water than on land.
NEWS
By John Frece and John Frece,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | January 24, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Every child under 12 on open pleasure boats in Maryland waters would have to wear a life jacket most of the time under legislation pushed yesterday by a Cecil County Democrat.Del. Ethel Murray's bill would not apply to children in an enclosed cabin or otherwise below deck, or to those riding in harbor taxis or other commercial passenger vessels regulated by the Coast Guard.Natural Resources Police Maj. Wayne O. Bromwell said his department supports the bill. The statistics he offered the Environmental Matters Committee did not show a widespread problem with children falling off boats and drowning, however.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Sun Staff Writer | April 9, 1995
In the latter part of May each year, schools of black drum begin to congregate off the mouth of the Choptank River on Maryland's Eastern Shore, and for a couple of weeks morning fishing can be fast and furious.But then the black drum disperse.Department of Natural Resources fisheries managers will implement a telemetry study this year to determine where the black drum go.Using fish caught by commercial fishermen and then implanted with acoustical tags by biologists, fisheries managers will be able to track the movements of the black drum.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | April 19, 2000
This summer's crab harvest won't be any better than last year's, according to the state Department of Natural Resources. But it won't be any worse. However, this season, which runs from April 1 to Nov. 30, has started more smoothly, according to Eric Schwaab, DNR fisheries manager. Commercial crabbers caught few crabs in April and May last year, but the harvest picked up later and finished strong. This year, "We're hearing from commercial watermen that they're catching a fair number of crabs early on," Schwaab.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | August 31, 1993
Fifty-three weeks ago, Hurricane Andrew blew ashore in Florida and caused more than $200 million damage to recreational boats, largely because boaters had not prepared their crafts for the coming storm.Hurricane Emily, which by this evening will either be ashore in the Carolinas or tracking up the Atlantic Coast toward Maryland waters, could present a similar threat to area boats and boaters.Even if Emily goes ashore in North Carolina, it is possible that as the hurricane loses strength over land it also will curve around to the north and northeast and pass through Maryland as a strong storm.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2013
An alarming spike in the number of fatalities over the past three years on Maryland waterways has prompted Gov. Martin O'Malley and Natural Resources Police to encourage boaters and swimmers to take part in Operation Dry Water this weekend. Operation Dry Water is a national initiative designed to promote boater safety, particularly cracking down on drinking and boating. Natural Resources Police patrolling Maryland waterways “will aggressively target those driving in a reckless or negligent manner and/or under the influence of alcohol.
FEATURES
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2013
After taking a vacation from much of the mid-Atlantic coast last winter, migrating seals have been spotted making a return to Ocean City 's bays and beaches. Two or three gray or harbor seals have been spotted so far, according to reports relayed to the Maryland Coastal Bays Program. The creatures typically migrate from Canada and Maine as the water cools, but during last year's mild winter, few were seen, with little explanation. Seal trackers are encouraging spectators to report and document sightings.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2012
The National Weather Service issued coastal flood warnings for many parts of Maryland until 8 a.m. Wednesday. The affected areas are southern Baltimore County and Harford, Anne Arundel, Calvert, Charles and St. Mary's counties. Baltimore and Harford Counties should expect high tide levels 2 feet above normal. The other areas are expected to see levels 1 to 2 feet higher than usual. The tides will likely bring inundation of shoreline areas and large waves at high tide could make flooding worse, according to the weather service.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | August 13, 2012
The costly struggle to reduce storm-water pollution in Maryland may be harder than previously thought - because much of what's been done so far to control runoff has been misreported, allowed to deteriorate - or perhaps never even done. That's the upshot of a new survey by Owings Mills environmental consultant Richard Klein. Of 175 storm-water retention ponds, rain gardens and other "best management practices" for capturing runoff that he checked out in Baltimore city and nine of Maryland's largest counties, Klein found that 40 percent of them were either misidentified or impossible to find at all. Klein, founder and head of Community & Environmental Defense Services , relied for his survey on " StormPrint ," a computerized data base of storm-water controls that's been developed by the Maryland Department of the Environment.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 27, 2012
Maryland's swimming beaches have better water quality than those in most coastal states, but still lag neighboring Delaware and Virginia, according to the latest review by an environmental group. In its annual nationwide survey of beach water quality, the Natural Resources Defense Council says that Maryland's public wading and swimming areas ranked 11th among 30 coastal states, including those bordering the Great Lakes.  Delaware ranked first overall, while Virginia ranked sixth, with fewer high-bacteria readings on their beaches.  But a stretch of beach in Ocean City running from 126th Street north to 145th Street earned the NRDC's five-star rating as one of the 12 cleanest in the nation, for not showing any bacteria problems since 2007 and having strong standards for frequent testing and prompt notification of the public if a problem is found.  Delaware's Dewey Beach also earned a five-star rating.
NEWS
August 8, 2011
With Baltimore in the midst of Restaurant Week, there are probably many happily dining on rockfish these days, and rightly so. Rockfish (more commonly known as striped bass) represent one of the Chesapeake Bay's most treasured bounties, both a worthy challenge to anglers and a delight on the dinner plate. But if there is a lingering bitterness surrounding the catch of the day, it is the still-fresh memory of last winter's poaching incidents. Natural Resources Police hauled in an estimated 26,000 pounds of rockfish caught illegally in unattended gill nets.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | December 3, 1992
A warning to fishermen: Eating your catch from some waterways could be more hazardous to your health than the federal government would have you believe.So says a national report released yesterday by the Environmental Defense Fund, a group based in New York.The findings relate to the following Maryland waters: Baltimore Harbor, Back River, Lake Roland and the Potomac River in Western Maryland.The report accuses the Environmental Protection Agency of misleading the public about the extent of fish contamination from toxic chemicals.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker | May 26, 1991
Last year there were 344 boating accidents reported in Maryland waters. In those accidents, 20 people died. Next Sunday, National Safe Boating Week opens, and several organizations have scheduled activities to promote more responsible boating.Take a minute and think about boat use. How often does it include packing the cooler with beer or mixers and running up that jaunty cocktail ensign?Take another minute and realize that of the 344 boating accidents in Maryland waters last year, 50 percent involved alcohol abuse by operators or crew.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2011
Maryland Natural Resources Police will be stepping up patrols this weekend in an attempt to curb drunken boating and the number of maritime fatalities, which threatens to exceed a 10-year high reached in 2009. Eleven boaters have died in Maryland waters so far this year. By comparison, the state didn't record its fourth boating-related death last year until June 24. "We're way above where we should be," said NRP Sgt. Art Windemuth. Operation Dry Water, an annual anti-drug and alcohol enforcement effort, will run from Friday through Sunday.
NEWS
August 17, 2010
If you are out on the water and get tossed overboard, as happened over the weekend when a boat carrying two men struck a buoy in the Elk River in Cecil County, your chances of survival increase markedly if you are wearing a life jacket. Initially, the two boaters involved in the accident late Saturday night were not wearing life jackets. One donned a jacket as he floundered. Later, he was rescued and taken to an area hospital with non-life-threatening injuries. The body of the other, who was operating the 28-foot power boat, was discovered by searchers Monday evening.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.