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November 5, 2012
Maryland voters will decide the outcome of seven ballot questions in November. Question 1 - All Maryland voters will decide whether the judges in Prince George's County who oversee estate and will disputes must be admitted to the Maryland Bar. Baltimore City and Montgomery and Harford counties currently require this. Supporters say the measure will professionalize the so-called “Orphan's Court” which oversees estate disputes. Opponents are concerned that the change will lead to a statewide requirement that Orphan's Court judges be attorneys, which they believe is unnecessary.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 12, 2014
Republican Larry Hogan could win this year's governor's race, but it's going to take more than he's shown voters so far in this campaign. That's the message of today's Sun Poll, which shows him trailing Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown by seven percentage points with just over three weeks to go before election day. The Sun's results are in line with two other recent polls, one conducted by the Washington Post, which showed Mr. Brown with a nine-point lead,...
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BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2010
Maryland has endured a bruising recession better than many other states, but voters here are still wary over the economy and personal finances, and could punish incumbent politicians at the ballot box next month, a Baltimore Sun survey shows. The Sun survey of 798 likely Maryland voters showed that nearly two-thirds worry about their finances — and one in four say they fret about money every day. More than half of voters say the performance of the economy will influence their voting decisions.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 25, 2014
In Ukraine last month, some people braved the threat of violence to get to the polls to vote for a new president. According to news reports, heavily armed men in ski masks tried to scare off voters by smashing ballot boxes and blocking entry to polling stations in the eastern part of the country; election officials were threatened, some kidnapped. In Maryland, we just had a primary election to nominate candidates for governor - you know, like the president of Maryland - and the voter turnout was embarrassingly low . The vast majority of registered Democrats and Republicans did not participate.
NEWS
September 23, 2011
A headline in your paper reported that "2012 called year gas tax must go up" (Sept. 20). Yet the article accompanying it failed to explain why. Has everyone forgotten that Gov. Martin O'Malley cleaned out the Transportation Trust Fund to balance his budget? Not only did he raid the transportation fund, he raided several others as well. The year 2012 needs to be the year that Maryland government lives within its means and that its trust funds are used as intended. These are not slush funds for politicians to hand out as perks.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | November 19, 2012
Maryland voters are supportive of health care reform even though some still haven't grasped all the details, a new survey has found. The survey sponsored by independent health philanthropy The Horizon Foundation and advocacy group Maryland Health Care for All! Coalition , found that those who would gain the most from health reform seemed to know the least about it. The study results were based on a telphone poll of 1,413 voters conducted September 14 to 23. Fifty-nine percent of respondents support health reform, compared to 19 percent who oppose it. The other 22 percent are unsure.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2012
If four years ago they voted for historic change, on Tuesday, Maryland supporters of President Barack Obama cast their ballots for patience. "I figure that in four years, he couldn't have done everything to right the course after the previous administration," Kimberly Shorter, 39, of Woodlawn said after casting her vote for him. "Of course, there was some disappointment with the fact that he didn't do everything he set out to do, but he's human...
NEWS
February 24, 2011
In 2010, Wisconsin gubernatorial candidate Scott Walker and his fellow conservative Republicans campaigned with a clear message that if elected, they would confront the public unions right to collective bargaining, cut salaries and benefits instead of using public worker layoffs to correct budget shortfalls. The public unions threw everything they could at Mr. Walker and the Republicans candidates but the voters found the conservative message the right one to correct the budget deficit and voted them in. The Sun's recent editorial ("Union Badgering," Feb. 22)
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and David Michael Ettlin,Staff Writer | November 4, 1992
Call it a Maryland miracle: While voters had to slog through snow to reach the polls in Wyoming and endure heavy rain in New England, clear skies and spring-like temperatures made the quadrennial exercise in citizenship feel like a picnic here."
NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR | August 15, 1993
Paul Tsongas is a popular guy these days. So is Ross Perot. Virtually every Maryland candidate contemplating a run for governor next year has embraced one of these iconoclasts.And no wonder. Mr. Tsongas coasted to victory over Bill Clinton in Maryland's 1992 Democratic presidential primary with a suburban strategy that could set new standards for future statewide elections. Then in November, Mr. Perot highlighted the discontent among a strong minority of voters -- 271,000 strong -- who could provide the winning margin in next year's state races.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2014
As votes were being counted Tuesday night, politicians and poll workers estimated that the turnout for the primary was among the lowest in recent history - leading some to call for the voting to be moved back to the fall in future years. Despite vigorous campaigning from a full slate of candidates for governor, attorney general and many high-profile local races, such as Baltimore state's attorney, some said the primary didn't take precedence over summer vacations. "The General Assembly should re-examine this," Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz, a Democrat, said at Hillcrest Elementary School in Catonsville.
NEWS
June 2, 2014
Two years ago, Republican Del. Neil Parrott and MdPetitions.com had become so adept at petitioning Maryland laws to referendum that some Democrats, Gov. Martin O'Malley included, urged the General Assembly to make it tougher to do. How foolish that looks now. Over the weekend, the conservative group came up short in its efforts to petition to referendum the transgender rights law passed this year by the legislature. MdPetitions.com had only to produce 18,500 signatures by midnight on Saturday - a goal the organization had little trouble meeting previously when it petitioned same-sex marriage or Maryland's version of the Dream Act in recent years.
NEWS
April 27, 2014
I was disappointed to learn that The Baltimore Sun omitted one of the most significant Republican gubernatorial teams in the recent editorial about the sparring between Attorney General Doug Gansler and Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown ( "Back seat bickering," April 23). Republican candidate Charles Lollar and his running mate Kenneth Timmerman offer a refreshing choice for all Maryland voters, and their candidacy should be given equal attention in any review of the primary contests. Unfortunately, The Sun's editorial board has either been distracted by the noisy infighting of the predominant party's contenders or purposefully chose to ignore Mr. Lollar, an experienced businessman and former Marine who has crafted a realistic and workable plan to eliminate wasteful and fraudulent spending that will increase economic viability and turn around the exit of businesses and revenue that have resulted in our current situation.
NEWS
April 17, 2014
To vote in November for Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown for governor of our state will likely mean MOTS (More Of The Same) from Annapolis. Mr. Brown has proven that he is incapable of true leadership, as was learned firsthand with the botched Maryland health care program. Marylanders are still patiently waiting to hear what became of state taxpayers' $125 million invested in the health care implosion. Will Lieutenant Governor Brown come forth with details about why the health program was doomed and scuttled?
NEWS
April 6, 2014
It appears that Maryland lawmakers think that Maryland voters work for them; they have raised taxes and fees 80 times on Gov. Martin O'Malley's watch ( "House rejects bid to block pay raises," April 1) There are a lot of Marylanders who work full-time jobs and make less than $43,500 dollars a year. In the private sector the employer, like Maryland voters, decides if an employee deserves a raise. Let's not forget that if these lawmakers are so unhappy with their salaries, why do they spend millions of dollars to get elected and re-elected?
NEWS
March 22, 2014
Who in local and state government is in charge of watching and controlling how our tax dollars are spent ( "Pratt, Young object to plan to hire outside auditors for city agencies," March 20)? We know that Gov. Martin O'Malley wasted over $200 million on a health care exchange that does not work. We have seen public employees in Baltimore being paid the wrong salary for years. When are Maryland voters going to demand accountability from government employees like the private sector does?
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 26, 2005
Maryland voters came out to the polls last year in greater numbers than they did during the 2000 election, according to new figures released today from the U.S. census. Nearly 66 percent of U.S. citizens in Maryland voted in the 2004 presidential election, an increase from 61 percent in 2000, the study revealed. The increase in voter turnout was similar to national figures, which showed an increase from 60 percent in 2000 to 64 percent in 2004. Statewide, 56 percent of blacks voted, which matched national figures.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
By a wide margin, Maryland voters want to raise the state's minimum wage to $10.10 a hour, a poll conducted for The Baltimore Sun shows. A majority of voters in every region of the state supports that wage increase, and the proposal has near-unanimous support from African-Americans, according to the poll. Statewide, 69 percent of voters surveyed said they back a proposal now being debated in the General Assembly to increase Maryland's minimum wage from the current federal level of $7.25 an hour to $10.10 by 2016.
NEWS
February 6, 2014
When are the majority of Maryland voters going to wake up and see that the progressive, far left politicians in our state care only about the rich, not the middle class and certainly not the poor? When our elected officials have an opportunity to perhaps lower taxes on the ones who can least afford to pay, what do they do? They plan a cut in estate taxes so the millionaires can leave more money for their families ("Estate tax relief seems on track in Annapolis," Feb. 2). How does that help the middle class and the poor?
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