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By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2010
The College of Notre Dame will be known as Notre Dame of Maryland University starting next fall, school officials announced Tuesday at an on-campus pep rally. President Mary Pat Seurkamp said the new name, chosen by a unanimous vote of the board of trustees Oct. 30, is a nod to a long tradition of all-women's undergraduate education and to Notre Dame's evolution into a more complex institution that offers doctoral degrees in education and pharmacy. "We needed a name that pointed to the best of both worlds," she said.
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NEWS
By Bruce Hull and Maggie Cohen | September 18, 2014
The University of Maryland University College (UMUC) is in crisis with declining student numbers. The challenge has accelerated in the last few years, and enrollments are projected to drop another 6.5 percent this fall, greatly due to competition from "for-profit" universities and a loss of military students. Unfortunately, UMUC's long term response to this challenge has led the institution to weaken its educational standards and imitate for-profit rivals. This is seen in UMUC's 5-year campaign to make student work less costly and less difficult, reducing the distance learning term from 12 to eight weeks, jettisoning peer-reviewed textbooks in favor of a hodgepodge of Internet resources, abolishing proctored exams, allowing substantially more credits to be earned through demonstrated student "competencies," promoting classroom credit for student "life experiences," and replacing final exams with "class projects.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2011
Born 200 years ago on Oct. 22, Franz Liszt changed music history. Even if the Hungarian-born pianist/composer had not done so, people would probably still remember him, if only for his romances. There was the dancer, Lola, who got so mad when Liszt tired of her that she followed him from city to city, finally crashing a banquet given in his honor and boogieing on a table in front of a startled crowd. And Olga, who, likewise faced with Liszt's waning affections, disguised herself as a gardener and burst into his villa ready to stab him. She settled for one more bout of lovemaking that night, but soon hounded him again, this time with a revolver and poison.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
Jasmine White was accepted to Morgan State University, her dream college, almost 10 years ago. But the New Yorker discovered she could not afford the out-of-state tuition. "I just started crying because I had no idea where I was going to get [the money] before class started," White recalled. Instead of coming to Baltimore, she earned an associate's degree at a community college in New York, and served five years in the Army Reserve. Now 26, she is finally enrolling at Morgan State this fall.
NEWS
By Patricia J. Mitchell | August 5, 2013
With the recent announcements that Wilson College in Pennsylvania and Pine Manor College in Massachusetts will join the lengthening list of formerly women-only institutions that are now co-educational - including Hood College and Goucher College here in Maryland - what hope is there for the single-sex colleges that remain? In a word: plenty. Graduates of women's colleges are twice as likely as female graduates of co-ed institutions to earn a Ph.D., attend medical school, be involved in philanthropic activity, attain higher positions in their careers and earn higher incomes.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2013
Maryland will soon be home to a new university — one in which students can train in acupuncture, Chinese herbs and other forms of integrative medicine. The Tai Sophia Institute, a Howard County holistic health training center, has received state accreditation and will be renamed the Maryland University of Integrative Health, school officials announced Monday. The school plans to nearly triple its student body, begin granting doctorates in acupuncture and other healing techniques, and bolster its reputation nationally and internationally, said its provost, Judith Broida.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2012
Mildred Otenasek, a pioneering force for women in Maryland Democratic politics and a much-loved professor and mentor at her alma mater, Notre Dame of Maryland University, died Nov. 19 at her home in Roland Park. She was 98. A diminutive, soft-spoken woman with a fierce intellect and a determination to both succeed and blaze a path for the women who would follow her, Mrs. Otenasek became a driving force in politics, including a stint as the first female member of the Democratic National Committee for Maryland.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2013
Sister Marie Vincent Brothers, a member of the School Sisters of Notre Dame who spent nearly three decades as a teacher and graphics designer at Notre Dame of Maryland University and was once described as one of the "swingingest" nuns, died June 8 at Maria Health Care Center in Baltimore County of lymphoma. She was 86. "She had a lovely gift of integrating art into just about everything," said Sister Miriam Jansen, who knew Sister Marie Vincent for at least 40 years. "Her creativity was just remarkable.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2014
Notre Dame of Maryland University announced Thursday that a New Jersey liberal arts college provost known for her research on domestic violence will be its new president. Marylou Yam, currently provost at Saint Peter's University, a Catholic liberal arts institution in Jersey City, N.J., will take over the post at the North Baltimore school on July 1. In a statement, Notre Dame officials said Yam played a key role in Saint Peter's transition from a college to a university. They said she exemplifies Notre Dame's mission of preparing leaders to transform the world as well as its active and longstanding commitment to social responsibility.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | April 30, 1998
Eastern Shore artist William Willis, who lives in Preston, Caroline County, is best known for his paintings of abstracted landscape elements. The paintings have been shown widely, but there has never been a major exhibit of his works on paper. Now there is, at University of Maryland University College in College Park. Comprising both prints and drawings, the show reveals the artist exploring formal issues, and the works also incorporate certain images the artist considers symbolic, such as a snake biting its tail and a bird in flight.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
Sylvia "Cookie" Harris, the wife of Rep. Andy Harris and a prominent anti-abortion advocate in Annapolis, died suddenly on Thursday, a spokeswoman for the congressman said. Mrs. Harris, who would have turned 58 this weekend, was a frequent presence in Annapolis, where state lawmakers said she was a forceful advocate for causes she believed in, particularly anti-abortion policies. "She was an amazing and wonderful woman, a fabulous mother and very supportive of Andy in all that he did," said Diana Waterman, chairwoman of the Maryland Republican Party.
NEWS
August 22, 2014
I read with great interest your article, "Residency program tries to solve problem of teacher burnout" (Aug. 18) about the Baltimore-based Urban Teacher Center developed by Jennifer Green, a former employee of the Baltimore City Schools. This initiative to procure highly talented, dual-certified future educators to serve our urban students is, like many teacher education pathways to certification in Maryland, a viable and successful endeavor. The Urban Teacher Center (UTC) reminds me of a similar program initiated under my supervision when I served as the human resource officer for the Baltimore City Public Schools.
NEWS
July 30, 2014
The University of Maryland University College has long been at the forefront of online continuing education and job training for its mostly adult student body, so a recent proposal by UMUC President Javier Miyares to tie the school's future more closely to the private sector and adopt a learning model that lets students progress at their own pace seems like a natural evolution of the institution's history of innovation. The plan is still in the preliminary stages, with many details left to be worked out. But overall it could represent a way forward for an institution with a worldwide student body that has experienced declining enrollments, staff cuts and increased competition from for-profit schools in recent years.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
Sister Mary Mark Walsh, a retired teacher who was a member of the Sisters of Mercy for nearly 78 years, died of heart failure Saturday at the Villa, her order's Baltimore County retirement home. She was 97. Born Ruth Anna Walsh in Baltimore County, she was the daughter of Charles S. Walsh, a farmer, and Minnie Woolrey Walsh, a homemaker. According to a biography supplied by the Sisters of Mercy, she grew up on the family farm near the Liberty Dam. There were no Catholic schools in immediate area and she received her early religious training from the Jesuit fathers at the old Woodstock College.
NEWS
By William E. Kirwan | June 28, 2014
As I look back over my 12 years as chancellor of the University System of Maryland (USM), one of the developments in which I take the most pride has been the USM's genuine partnership with state leaders in Annapolis. Now that the primary is over and the election looms, I encourage candidates for office across Maryland, especially those running for governor, to commit themselves to upholding this partnership. It has served our students, the state and the citizens exceptionally well.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2014
Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake will sign a pact with several leading universities and hospitals Wednesday to work together on some of the city's most vexing challenges, officials said. The Baltimore City Anchor Plan calls on city agencies and the local institutions to discuss how they can share goals and resources to address public safety, business and the quality of life in the city. Set to sign the pact are the leaders of the Johns Hopkins University, Bon Secours Hospital, Coppin State University, Loyola University Maryland, the Maryland Institute College of Art , Morgan State University, Notre Dame of Maryland University and the University of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2014
Josephine Atwater, a retired state Department of Human Resources employee who was a founding member of the Renaissance Institute at Notre Dame of Maryland University, died of cancer Thursday at her Halethorpe home. She was 89. Born Josephine Louise McNulty in Baltimore, she was the daughter of Thomas Aloysius McNulty, an Army Corps of Engineers employee, and Catherine Louise Gempp McNulty, who worked at American Can Co. Raised on Poplar Grove Street, she was a 1942 graduate of the Institute of Notre Dame and earned a bachelor of arts degree at Notre Dame of Maryland University after attending Mount St. Agnes Junior College.
SPORTS
By Jonas Shaffer and The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
The Maryland football team's latest pledge got the school name backward, but Randy Edsall probably is willing to overlook that. Verbally committed to play football at Maryland university #BIG10 #Terps pic.twitter.com/fZfve1bl7X - Gus Little (@Gus_Little1) June 19, 2014 Little, a three-star linebacker out of Massaponax High in Fredericksburg, Va., committed to Maryland on Thursday, becoming the Terps' 10th commit in the class of 2015. The 6-foot-3, 230-pound Little also claimed offers from Boston College and Army, among others.
SPORTS
By Jonas Shaffer and The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
The Maryland football team's latest pledge got the school name backward, but Randy Edsall probably is willing to overlook that. Verbally committed to play football at Maryland university #BIG10 #Terps pic.twitter.com/fZfve1bl7X - Gus Little (@Gus_Little1) June 19, 2014 Little, a three-star linebacker out of Massaponax High in Fredericksburg, Va., committed to Maryland on Thursday, becoming the Terps' 10th commit in the class of 2015. The 6-foot-3, 230-pound Little also claimed offers from Boston College and Army, among others.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
Mary Bracken Neale, a retired natal intensive care nurse and ocean sailor, died of cancer May 10 at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The Towson resident was 74. Born Mary Elizabeth Bracken in Baltimore and raised on Atwood Road, she was the daughter of Thomas Bracken, a National Labor Relations Board attorney, and Adeline Ogier Bracken, an award-winning athlete and graduate of what is now Notre Dame of Maryland University. Mrs. Neale attended St. Mary's of the Assumption School in Govans and was a 1958 graduate of Maryvale Preparatory School.
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