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Maryland Tobacco

NEWS
By Dan Berger | February 21, 2001
Our side will bomb Iraq till Saddam Hussein (A) dies; (B) makes friends; (C)quits arming or (D) swallows three other countries. Choose one. Dale Earnhardt died so that NASCAR might flourish. Dan Burton and Arlen Specter want Bill to be president forever so their investigations never end. Agricultural educators want to convert Maryland tobacco growers into socially useful vintners.
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NEWS
May 7, 1991
Maryland's tobacco auction season has closed, posting the highest average price in its history at $187.19 a hundred pounds, according to the Maryland State Tobacco Authority.More than 9 million pounds of tobacco was sold at a value of $16,917,239, the authority reported. This represents an increase of 1.3 million pounds and $3.8 million in value from 1990.The 14-day tobacco auction exceeded the former record high price by $12.26 a hundred pounds set in 1982, the authority said.
BUSINESS
By MEREDITH COHN and MEREDITH COHN,SUN STAFF | April 4, 2004
Jacob Faiser said he's been growing tobacco since "I became old enough," and plans to continue, even though the majority of tobacco farmers in Maryland have agreed to stop. He also plans to put each of his nine children to work in the tobacco fields at 16. At 21, they will start their own family and farm. "It's what we know how to raise," the Amish farmer said matter-of-factly during a trip last month to Hughesville in Charles County to auction off his crop. Most of Maryland's tobacco growers - about 85 percent who produced 95 percent of the crop - have agreed to switch to other crops under a state buyout program.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2000
UPPER MARLBORO -- Like his father and his father's father, Leroy Russell is a tobacco farmer. Russell can trace his family's involvement with tobacco to a farm near Clements in 1650, shortly after the first European settlers arrived at St. Clements Island, aboard the Ark and the Dove. His ancestors rolled hogsheads of tobacco down to St. Clements bay, where ships waited to carry the valuable crop back to Europe. Tobacco was the backbone of Maryland's early economy. It was used as currency by the settlers.
NEWS
May 16, 2007
Baltimore residents who wish to quit smoking can obtain free nicotine patches or gum - as well as free telephone counseling sessions with experienced smoking-cessation experts - under a program coordinated by the Baltimore City Health Department. The patches and gum can be obtained by calling 800-QUIT-NOW. The service is funded by the state and run by Free and Clear. The city's share of Maryland's tobacco control program is paying for the nicotine replacement therapy, according to health officials.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2014
The air is alive with perhaps a dozen sweet scents at Kahuna Vapor in Ellicott City, customers adding to the aroma with every vaporous exhalation. They're not smoking. They're "vaping" - using a battery-powered electronic cigarette that heats flavored liquid nicotine into a vapor users can inhale. Such stores are popping up fast nationwide, quadrupling in the last year alone to about 3,000, according to an estimate by the Smoke Free Alternatives Trade Association. Kahuna Vapor, one of at least three to open locally in the last two months, opened a storefront soon after starting as an online business making local deliveries.
NEWS
By Jen DeGregorio and Jen DeGregorio,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | March 28, 2004
Amish farmers from Cecil County were among those attending the opening of last week's tobacco auction in Charles County, where the Farmers and Hughesville warehouses are the state's only remaining tobacco auction sites. Although the number of tobacco farmers has fallen in almost every county since Maryland started its buyout of farmers in 2001, the number is increasing in Cecil County, traditionally a nontobacco area. The reason is the Amish. Amish tobacco farmers - who for religious reasons do not participate in government programs - have crossed the Pennsylvania border into Cecil to try their luck at tobacco in Maryland.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | May 31, 2000
David L. Conrad's state government job puts him in an unusual position. While Gov. Parris N. Glendening crusades to snuff out tobacco use in Maryland, Conrad is busy distributing seeds to the state's 1,200 tobacco farmers and researching ways to help them improve their crops. Conrad recognizes the irony of his job as tobacco specialist for the University of Maryland, College Park cooperative extension program. But he says he's filling a traditional role by helping a segment of Maryland's farmers.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2005
UPPER MARLBORO - The tobacco thriving here on the University of Maryland's research farm looks like the plant that dominated state agriculture for centuries, the leaves mint green, fuzzy to the touch, long and wide as the blades of a ceiling fan. These plants have been to college, though, and might be nearing the threshold of a future that generations of tobacco farmers would scarcely recognize. For one thing, this vision of Maryland tobacco's future is stamped "NO SMOKING." Think, instead, of tobacco as a component of cosmetics, diet supplements, medicine or shampoo.
NEWS
By Robert M. Pennington of the Ann Arrundell County Historical Society | September 25, 1994
75 Years Ago* The Naval Academy formally reopened today with 2,086 midshipmen under pre-war conditions of a four-year course. -- The Sun, Oct. 1, 1919.* Anne Arundel County is facing a sugar crisis with prices over 11 cents a pound and expected to rise to 15 cents. Prohibition is being blamed as former drinkers of alcoholic beverages are turning to soft drinks and candy. -- The Sun, Oct. 9, 1919.* The American Legion sponsored a membership smoker in Annapolis that was enjoyed by over 100 men from Anne Arundel County.
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