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December 12, 1992
The Finance Committee of the University of Maryland System will conduct a public forum from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Dec. 16 at the University of Maryland Baltimore County in the Catonsville school's faculty/staff dining hall to discuss tuition policy.The committee will address these issues and others: Should the tuition policy of the 11-campus University of Maryland System ensure accessfor qualified students regardless of ability to pay? Should the system's institutions charge different tuition for different academic programs?
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NEWS
By William E. Kirwan | June 28, 2014
As I look back over my 12 years as chancellor of the University System of Maryland (USM), one of the developments in which I take the most pride has been the USM's genuine partnership with state leaders in Annapolis. Now that the primary is over and the election looms, I encourage candidates for office across Maryland, especially those running for governor, to commit themselves to upholding this partnership. It has served our students, the state and the citizens exceptionally well.
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BUSINESS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | February 4, 1996
The Dream Home feature will periodically visit the homes of notable citizens.Not too many people can say a dream house came with their job.However, for the chancellor of the University of Maryland System, living at Hidden Waters, a three-story brick mansion on 120 acres in Baltimore County, is a condition of employment.In 1988, shortly after Donald N. Langenberg took the position as chancellor, the Board of Regents decided that the chancellor should live there. The board leased the property from the University of Maryland Foundation, a private, not-for-profit that manages gifts to the university.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2014
Veterans in Maryland scheduling a primary care appointment through the Department of Veterans Affairs for the first time wait an average of 80 days to see a doctor, making the state's system fourth-worst in the nation out of 141 systems reviewed, according to data released by the federal government. An extensive audit made public Monday as part of the agency's effort to confront a national scandal over wait times showed that the VA Maryland Health Care System performed worse on that measure than Atlanta, Dallas and Boston, where wait times averaged 64 days, 60 days and 59 days, respectively.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Evening Sun Staff | December 10, 1991
The University of Maryland System Board of Regents unanimously voted today to merge its Baltimore City and Baltimore County campuses.The resolution approved by 16 board members today also asks Gov. William Donald Schaefer and state legislators to give the necessary approvals, which would probably include a bill in the General Assembly.If approved, the combined school would be called University of Maryland Baltimore.The new school would focus on the health sciences, life sciences, technology, social work, law and public policy.
NEWS
By DONALD N. LANGENBERG and WILLIAM C. RICHARDSON | January 22, 1992
Imagine this headline in the sports section: ''World-classrunner shoots self in foot to heal broken leg.''Laughable, of course. It would never happen.But turn back to the front page a moment: ''Higher ed funding cut again as state struggles with economic slump.''We're shooting ourselves in the foot, all right. Just when Maryland is most in need of both the intellectual vigor and the job-creating power of its colleges and universities, we have taken aim at them and squeezed the trigger.Gov.
NEWS
June 30, 1992
For its first dive in the fund-raising pool, the University of Maryland System executed a fairly impressive full-gainer: UMS has reached a $200 million goal it had set for its five-year campaign 1 1/2 years ahead of schedule. The campaign, begun in 1988, isn't to run out until the end of 1993, so officials have revised the goal to a level they initially rejected as unrealistic: $236 million."It can no longer be said that Maryland's public universities do not enjoy private support," said Allen J. Krowe, a senior vice president and chief financial officer of Texaco Inc., who chairs the campaign.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | April 5, 1996
Towson State University is no stranger to name changes. It's had four in 130 years.But now it's ready for a new identity.Hoke L. Smith, president of the university, would like to eliminate "state" from the name, calling it Towson University."
NEWS
By DONALD N. LANGENBERG | July 1, 1993
College Park. -- The University of Maryland System is five years old today! A birthday is a good time in the life of a person or an institution to take stock, to ask ''How are we doing?'' For our system, the answer is ''Remarkably well, everything considered.''The University of Maryland System was created to provide Maryland with a nationally eminent system of public higher education. In its initial years, it was given unprecedented increases in financial support. Hopes and expectations were high.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | October 5, 1996
If regents who set policy for Maryland's public university system have their way, the university in Towson will lose its state. The public professional schools in downtown Baltimore will lose a preposition. And Maryland's flagship university will lose its hometown.Under a measure adopted unanimously yesterday by regents at a meeting in Cambridge, Towson State University would become Towson University.The University of Maryland College Park, the flagship campus, and the University of Maryland at Baltimore, the cluster of professional schools, would both call themselves the University of Maryland -- although, on official letterheads, their hometowns would be listed either after a comma or below the words "University of Maryland."
NEWS
By George W. Liebmann | February 19, 2014
The state pension system is Maryland's financial Achilles heel and has been for decades. All bond rating services have noted that rising pension debt endangers the state's AAA bond rating, and the Pew Center on the States rates Maryland as among the most under-funded states. The pension board is a semi-professional board made up of 15 people, a third of whom have investment expertise. It is presided over by the state treasurer, who is elected by the General Assembly. Traditionally, state treasurers were boring but capable bankers.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2013
After a surgical scandal involving a cardiologist brought St. Joseph Medical Center to its knees, the medical staff left behind struggled to move forward. Patients and doctors fled in droves after the scandal broke in 2009. Negative headlines beat at their morale. And many remaining employees believed the distant owner of the once-well-regarded community hospital in Towson was unresponsive, leaving them feeling abandoned. "It was difficult to face the reality that someone I trusted very much had failed us," said Dr. Gail Cunningham, a 23-year veteran who headed the emergency department and is now vice president of medical affairs.
NEWS
By John Reid | November 14, 2013
A patient-care technician for the University of Maryland Medical System must update his skills regularly to keep his job, but he hasn't seen an update in his salary. Another UMMS technician must work at least two jobs to have any money left after paying basic living expenses. And a third caregiver, who has worked for the medical system for several years, can barely afford care for his family at the very hospital where he cares for others. For UMMS caregivers, is this situation fair, decent or moral?
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2013
It is 6:45 a.m. and Severna Park High School freshman Chelsea Rogers has a decision to make: skip the most important meal of the day or skip the school bus. "There's no time for breakfast," said Rogers after reaching the corner of Hill Road and Baltimore Annapolis Boulevard in Severna Park, where the bus will take her to school in time for classes to begin at 7:17 a.m. She said she hadn't had a bite since 8 p.m. the night before and wouldn't eat...
NEWS
December 3, 2012
St. Joseph Medical Center officially became part of the University of Maryland Medical System this past weekend, and it's difficult not to see this development as a victory for all involved. The hospital had been rocked by a malpractice scandal — and hundreds of lawsuits — involving unnecessary surgeries conducted by its cardiology department, and the new ownership would seem to give the institution and its employees a fresh start. For several years, St. Joseph has been operating under a cloud left behind by Dr. Mark Midei and the stent procedures of questionable merit.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2012
A federal court has dismissed a case against a rehabilitation hospital owned by the University of Maryland Medical System that was accused of diagnosing patients with a rare malnutrition-related disorder to collect bigger Medicare and Medicaid payments. The federal government filed a $8.1 million lawsuit in U.S. District Court against Kernan Hospital last year, saying the West Baltimore facility manipulated its computer system to show that patients suffered from kwashiorkor, a disease most typically found in impoverished regions.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | January 11, 1996
Leaders of most of Maryland's colleges and universities have agreed to put aside their traditional rivalry during the General Assembly session and instead push for money for all the state's higher education institutions.Typically, presidents of the community colleges, private campuses and public universities clamor to win support for their schools -- even to the point of belittling their rivals.But University of Maryland System Chancellor Donald N. Langenberg, at the behest of state Sen. Barbara A. Hoffman a Baltimore Democrat, among others, convened several meetings of the state's college presidents last year to plan a coordinated campaign.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Sun Staff Writer | April 5, 1994
Has the Maryland hospital regulatory system outlived its usefulness? Is Maryland the leader or the laggard of health reform? Those are the questions the state's business leaders are asking these days. With good reason:* For the first time in 18 years, Maryland hospital costs rose faster than the national average in 1993.* At the same time, Maryland hospitals earned record profits on declining admissions.* At least two hospitals in the past two months asked for and received permission to lower their prices.
NEWS
Marta H. Mossburg | April 10, 2012
State legislators often prioritize important legislation the way kindergartners rank vegetables among the food groups. They focus on media-friendly social legislation instead of structural reform requiring time and effort to understand and craft. Why, for example, did they pass gay marriage and a law regulating how long a child must face rearward in a car seat but not figure out the budget until the absolute last minute? And why didn't they spend time this year on how to pay the pensions of the 373,000 people in the state retirement system?
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2012
Financially troubled St. Joseph Medical Center ended its search for a new owner Friday, announcing that it has entered an agreement to become part of the rapidly expanding University of Maryland Medical System. The announcement was greeted with cheers at the Towson hospital, said Dr. Paul McAfee, head of spinal surgery. "If the doctors in the operating room and emergency room had flowers, they would have thrown them," he said, adding that UMMS plans to upgrade the facilities and turn the hospital into a major surgery center.
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