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By Liz Bowie | liz.bowie@baltsun.com | January 16, 2010
Schoolchildren are being asked to empty their piggy banks and hold fundraisers in a statewide campaign organized by the Maryland State Department of Education to help children in Haiti. The donations will be collected at the state's 1,600 schools and then given to the 2010 Haiti Relief and Development Fund of the American Red Cross. "Most students have seen the devastation in Haiti, and they feel helpless. This is something they can do," said Bill Reinhard, a spokesman for the department.
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TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Was it Big Kahuna? That's just a guess after seeing a video of a shark circling a boat off the coast of Ocean City that was posted online by University of Maryland student Aaron Caplan. Caplan, 19, said he was shark fishing with friends on July 30 about 5-6 miles off shore when a great white shark became curious about his boat. He estimated the shark was about 13-15 feet - a wee bit smaller than his 24-foot fishing boat. "It got close enough that we identified it as a great white," he said in a phone interview Thursday, adding that he never expected to attract anything that big. "We actually got to pet it one of the times when it rubbed against the boat.
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NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2010
Maryland seniors performed slightly better on both the math and critical reading sections of the SAT in 2010, according to results released Monday by the College Board. Graduating seniors increased their average math scores over last year from 502 to 506 and their average reading scores from 500 to 501. Average writing scores remained the same at 495. The highest possible score on each section is 800. "Our state's students continue to improve across the board, with some of the biggest gains coming from minority students often underrepresented on national tests," said state schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick.
NEWS
July 10, 2014
It's heartening that Baltimore City's new schools CEO, Gregory Thornton, has made limiting the number of out-of-school suspensions for the system's youngest children a priority in his first weeks on the job. In doing so he has sent a strong signal to principals and teachers that they need to find alternative methods for disciplining troublesome or disruptive students and that kicking kids out of school is rarely effective and should only be used as...
NEWS
Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie | July 9, 2013
Teachers and administrators across the state are nervous about the move this fall to a new curriculum, one that everyone believes will expect a lot more from students. The Common Core will require students to read more non-fiction, to write more often and to learn math more deep. The switch from a Maryland curriculum to a voluntary national curriculum means school systems are now deep in the weeds of rewriting their lessons for the fall or winter. So there's a lot of angst in schools around the region and across the country.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2011
On a warm spring day when the only thing Maryland students would have had to complain about was a strong, gusting wind, the school and basketball program were dealt another shocking blow in as many days. This time, the winds of change carried away coach Gary Williams after 22 seasons at Maryland. A day after sophomore center Jordan Williams signed with an agent and officially left the men's basketball program without a viable low-post presence for the 2011 season, the coach resigned suddenly Thursday afternoon, casting an uncharacteristically quiet pall over the College Park campus on a beautiful spring evening.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
The overwhelming majority of Maryland's high school graduates are passing state assessments needed to obtain a diploma, according to data released Wednesday by the state Department of Education, though gaps persist between minority students and their peers. Roughly 59,500 students in the Class of 2013 completed high school, with nearly 90 percent passing the High School Assessments, which are required for graduation and are administered in English, algebra and biology. No student failed to graduate because of failing to meet the requirement.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 1, 2011
December 1960 was a memorable month for disasters. On Dec. 16, United Airlines Flight 826 from Chicago was headed for Idlewild Airport, now John F. Kennedy International, when it collided over New York City with Trans World Airways Flight 266, which had originated in Dayton, Ohio, and was preparing to land at LaGuardia. The spectacular daytime collision, which occurred while it was raining, sleeting and slightly foggy, sent debris and death into Brooklyn's Park Slope neighborhood.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,arin.gencer@baltsun.com | August 20, 2009
Maryland students continued to post slight gains on the ACT this year, with scores consistently remaining above the national average, according to results released Wednesday for the Class of 2009. "This is a reflection of the quality of the instruction that students are receiving," said state schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick, who also noted Maryland's better performance relative to neighboring states on the national standardized test taken by students applying for college. The percentage of "college ready" students rose by one point from last year, to 30 percent - compared with 23 percent nationwide, according to the state ACT report.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF WRITER | August 30, 2005
Dressed in a crisp white shirt and neatly pressed khakis, Corey Neal arrived at his new Annapolis charter school yesterday at precisely 7:30 a.m., prepared for classes that will run until 5 p.m. and for a stringent code of conduct. Corey was among thousands of Maryland students who joined an educational experiment yesterday, as 10 new charter schools opened their doors in Baltimore City and Anne Arundel County. Before yesterday, Maryland's only charter school was in Frederick County. The charter schools are the first to open since a 2003 state law required local school boards to establish policies for allowing charter schools, which receive government funds but have greater freedom in curriculum and policies.
NEWS
By Wallace D. Loh | June 30, 2014
Tuesday, the University of Maryland officially joins the Big Ten athletic conference. This is a winning moment for both athletics and academics at Maryland. In stadiums, arenas and on the Big Ten Network, new and challenging match-ups will excite Maryland players, fans and supporters. The Terps will compete at the highest level when they play against Ohio State's Buckeyes, Michigan's Wolverines, Penn State's Nittany Lions and other Big Ten teams. We will welcome to Maryland and to the Baltimore-Washington corridor the thousands of Big Ten fans who travel with their teams, as well as the tens of thousands of Big Ten alumni who already live in the area.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2014
He moved to Baltimore to take a job as a property manager, but when the company he worked for collapsed, Ganesh Boodram said, he found himself living in the streets. Homelessness was cruel to the Boston native. He was hit by a car, shattering a shoulder. Despite his skills as a handyman, few would hire him. He rarely got to see his grown daughters. Things got so bad not long ago, he said, he decided to take his own life. Then he walked into a small health center in Southwest Baltimore.
NEWS
April 11, 2014
On behalf of the nation's more than 200,000 career and technical education (CTE) professionals, I would like to thank The Sun for its recent editorial highlighting the importance of career and technical education ( "The day after graduation," April 7). It is crucial that Americans, especially parents and students, understand the value of these programs and the return on public investment provided by CTE. Maryland students can benefit from the millions of well-paying, respected careers that are available in CTE fields.
NEWS
January 15, 2014
When Education Week released its latest assessment of state education systems last week, the news for Maryland was once again great. Maryland remained the only state in the nation to receive at least a "B" across all six categories. Maryland was one of only five states to narrow the achievement gap for low income students by more than five percentage points. Maryland was first in Advanced Placement success. These accomplishments resulted in the No. 1 composite state ranking in the nation for the sixth consecutive year.
SPORTS
By Eric Meany and The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2013
Deana Parris had a decision to make. A year after she joined the trampoline team at the Fairland Sports and Aquatics Center in Laurel, her parents declared that she and her brother had to pare down their many extracurricular activities to two each. Choir would make the cut, Parris decided, leaving one spot open for sports. After thinking it over, she eventually chose to continue with trampoline even though she had been playing soccer longer. "My dad asked me why," Parris said.
NEWS
December 26, 2013
How disappointing to see the visual summary of state spending from 2008 to present in teacher-to-pupil ratio in The New York Times . Maryland was the worst state for not putting funds back into education after the recession. We need to reinvigorate spending in our Maryland public schools. With all the new gambling money in the state coffers, we need to embrace a first-rate education. Large classes do little to stimulate minds and foster lifelong learners. The articles I read in The Sun claim Maryland has a great educational system.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff Writer Mark Bomster, Meredith Schlow, Anne Haddad, Donna Boller and Michael K. Burns of the metropolitan staff contributed to this article | March 27, 1992
Nearly 70 percent of Maryland students scored at the lowest levels of a state-designed test to see if they can apply what they've learned in the classroom.State officials insisted the potentially embarrassing numbers were unimportant, however."It's important that we put this in the proper context," said state Superintendent of Schools Nancy S. Grasmick, who assembled 350 educators from around the state to announce the long-awaited results of the Maryland School Assessment Program (MSPAP).
FEATURES
By Rasmi Simhan and Rasmi Simhan,SUN STAFF | June 15, 2000
A Holocaust survivor didn't tell his children or his parents about the time he spent in the Warsaw ghetto. But he told students and their video camera. Fighter pilots spent hours telling another student about the Battle of Midway. He in turn spent 20 hours editing their words on film. These documentaries, both by Maryland students, reached the final round of the 25th annual National History Day contest this week in Washington. Winners in four presentation categories will be announced today(in a ceremony that will be Webcast live from 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on www.TheHistoryChannel.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2013
Acknowledging that scores on a national reading test may have been inflated, Maryland education officials changed course this week, saying they will work harder to reduce the number of special education students excluded from taking the test. State school Superintendent Lillian M. Lowery said she would discuss the issue with local superintendents, testing directors and special education supervisors across the state in the coming year, putting more pressure on the local school districts to limit the practice.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2013
For the first time this spring, students who want to take a class at the University of Baltimore with a Pulitzer Prize-winning civil rights historian won't be bound by the university they chose to attend. The class, taught by local author Taylor Branch, is the University System of Maryland's first crack at offering an online, credit course for students from any of the system's 14 institutions, including Coppin, Towson and the University of Maryland, College Park. They will be able to communicate and interact in real time with classmates and with Branch, best known for writing the trilogy "America in the King Years.
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