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Maryland State Police

NEWS
October 5, 2013
The Benson Post Office was robbed Saturday morning by a man who fired at a Good Samaritan as he followed the robber getting away, according to Maryland State Police. At about 9:41 a.m., troopers from the Bel Air Barrack of the Maryland State Police responded to the Benson Post Office at 108 Connolly Road for a report of an armed robbery. , Benson, Harford County, Maryland for an armed robbery. The suspect displayed a weapon to the cashier. After he fled the post office, a Good Samaritan chased the suspect.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2013
Maryland State Police are searching for two of three men they say robbed an Eldersburg bank Saturday morning. Employees of the Carroll Community Bank, 1321 Liberty Road, told police that three men entered the bank shortly after 11:30 a.m., displayed a gun and demanded money, police said. One robber fled in a red Dodge Durango on Barnett Avenue, while the others left in a blue four-door sedan, police said. Police apprehended a suspect in the red Dodge Durango after a brief pursuit.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2013
Maryland's new handgun licensing law will be waived for the nearly 50,000 gun buyers still waiting for background checks, the state police said Tuesday. The department also deployed a new team of two dozen data-entry workers to help address the backlog, which has left gun purchasers waiting for months. Maryland's new gun law, which takes effect Tuesday, calls for handgun buyers to give their fingerprints to law enforcement and get a $50 license. An advisory letter from the attorney general said even buyers who applied long ago would have to comply with those provisions if they didn't pick up their firearm until Oct. 1 or after.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
Maryland's gun laws are widely considered tougher than those of neighboring Virginia, but they would not have stopped the Navy Yard shooter from buying a shotgun and walking out of a store with it the same day. Authorities said Aaron Alexis' Monday shooting spree that killed 12 in Washington began with a 12-gauge, 870 Remington pump-action shotgun. He had purchased it two days before from a Virginia gun shop. If Alexis - who police said had brushes with the law and showed signs of mental illness - had visited a Maryland gun store instead, he would have been able to walk out with the same gun. Most of Maryland's strict laws about background checks, waiting periods and purchase limits apply only to regulated firearms, which in most cases means handguns and assault rifles, Maryland State Police spokesman Greg Shipley said.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
Marylanders have been rushing to buy guns at a rate of 1,000 a day over the past two weeks, hastening the pace of an unprecedented surge in gun sales. More than 102,000 gun purchase applications have been submitted so far this year - twice the number for all of 2011, state police said Monday. "It's like Prohibition," said Rick Kain, a gun owner from Howard County. "People want to get their guns before the law takes effect. " Maryland's tough new gun control law takes effect next week, banning the sale of assault-style rifles and requiring fingerprints and a license to buy a handgun.
NEWS
September 19, 2013
The easiest place to throw the blame regarding the backlog of gun background checks is on the Maryland State Police (" Critics say state police have risked gun buyers' privacy," Sept. 16). But, in fact, it just highlights your ignorance on the matter. The police are a state entity under the control of Gov. Martin O'Malley. They, like another other department, have a budget that has to be submitted and approved. Perhaps you didn't stop and consider that they were not given the resources to tackle such a problem.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2013
A state lawyer determined there was nothing illegal about Maryland State Police deploying dozens of state workers from other agencies to help claw through a backlog of more than 35,000 background checks for gun buyers. In a Monday "letter of advice" to Allegany County Del. Kevin Kelly, who questioned the legality of the move, a lawyer from the Maryland attorney general's office, wrote that no law prevents state workers from doing clerical work for another agency and state police did not violate a law requiring Maryland State Police to review and investigate applications to buy guns.
NEWS
By Justin George, John Fritze and Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2013
John Johnson could have retired from the Washington Navy Yard years ago, but he loved the work. Richard Michael Ridgell, a former Maryland state trooper who helped train police in Iraq, was devoted to his daughters. Vishnu Pandit, who came to the United States to build a better life for his family, was proud of his quarter-century working for the U.S. Navy. All were gunned down Monday in one of the worst mass killings ever on a U.S. military installation. As investigators continued Tuesday to sift clues into the motivations of alleged shooter Aaron Alexis, details began to emerge of the women and men authorities say he shot to death.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis and Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2013
Maryland State Police used an unencrypted website last week to transfer personal information about firearm purchasers into an online system used for background checks, a practice that gun rights advocates say compromised their privacy and security. The state agency says it has no evidence that anybody's information was accessed improperly, arguing that it had safeguards in place. But for some gun owners and lawmakers, the revelation compounded concerns about state efforts to tackle a massive backlog of background check applications.
NEWS
September 12, 2013
Dear Governor O'Malley: I am writing to share a portion of an e-mail that I received Friday, Sept. 6, stating that "the Governor and the Maryland State Police were going to be calling on five other state agencies to help do data entry to help clear up the backlog of gun applications. " Each agency is "expected to do 8,000 applications over the next two days. " Within hours of my receipt of this information, word had already gotten out to the public. My office started receiving a firestorm of e-mails from very upset citizens of this state.
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