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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 26, 2002
Maryland State Police said yesterday they are seeking a driver in an apparent road-rage shooting on southbound Interstate 795 in Owings Mills that left a Hampstead woman with a bullet wound in the foot. Just before midnight Friday, police say, a motorist pulled alongside a Chevrolet Blazer driven by Everett L. Poole, 32, of Lineboro and fired a single shot into the Blazer's passenger door, grazing the foot of passenger Josie M. Steger, 31, of Hampstead. The shooter continued south on I-795 as Poole pulled over.
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NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | June 6, 1997
Anne Arundel police raided the home of an Odenton man who owns a septic service Wednesday looking for drugs and found a 30-foot wide hole filled with raw sewage a few yards from the shore of a creek that runs into the Patuxent River.Carol Frye, a county police spokeswoman, said yesterday the hole was "close enough to the river that if it overflows, [the sewage] is going into the river."Police called the Environmental Protection Agency, which turned the investigation of possible environmental violations to the Maryland State Police.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2014
George B. Brosan, a former Maryland State Police superintendent from Annapolis, died Thursday, according to the state police. Brosan served as state police superintendent from Nov. 1, 1985 until April 22, 1987. Before leading the state police, Brosan had worked in law enforcement for 26 years, including with the New York Police Department, the U.S. Customs Service and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency, incuding as deputy assistant administrator of the DEA. Brosan was appointed Maryland State Police superintendent by Gov. Harry R. Hughes following the retirement of Wilbert T. Travers Jr. The current Maryland State Police superintendent, Col. Marcus L. Brown, said in a statement that Brosan served "with a diligent commitment to excellence.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2004
A shooting at a Baltimore County nightclub appears to have been sparked by a rivalry between motorcycle gangs, putting police on the watch for what they fear could become an ugly turf war in Maryland, authorities said yesterday. The gunman in the shooting Sunday night at Club Tattle Tails in Edgemere was wearing a vest identifying him as a prospective member of the Hells Angels motorcycle gang, and the two shooting victims are apparently members of the Pagans gang, police said. One of the victims remained in critical condition last night.
NEWS
September 16, 1999
PoliceWestminster: An employee of Ritz Camera in Cranberry Mall told city police Monday that a video recorder was stolen from the store. The loss was estimated at $200.Finksburg: A resident of Summerfield Drive told Maryland State Police Tuesday that a gas grill was stolen from outside the home. The loss was estimated at $1,600.Westminster: An employee of Timonium developer James Keelty & Co. told Maryland State Police that someone entered a residence under construction in the 1100 block of Chandler Drive between 4 p.m. Monday and 10 a.m. Tuesday and stole 20 sheets of plywood.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson | September 29, 1990
After working for 13 months to identify two female bodies found in a trash bin behind a Joppatowne supermarket, Maryland State Police detectives not only found out yesterday who the women were, but learned that the suspected murderer was a police officer from New Jersey.The break in the case came when a Philadelphia police officer matched composite pictures of the women made by the Maryland State Police with Teletype descriptions of two missing women from Gloucester County, N.J.The suspect, Sgt. Andrew J. Woodrow, 26, a six-year veteran of the police department in Woodbury, N.J., was already under arrest and in jail in New Jersey.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | January 9, 1999
The Maryland State Police have fired a probationary trooper charged with raping a female acquaintance after a party celebrating his graduation from the academy, a spokesman said yesterday.Jonathan M. Pilch, 26, of Myersville was fired Wednesday after an internal investigation of the criminal charges by Maryland State Police officers, said Capt. Gregory M. Shipley.Pilch is charged with second-degree rape, a felony, and his trial has been scheduled for early next month."The information contained in that investigation was cause enough to terminate him," Shipley said.
NEWS
June 16, 1993
WHAT'S the most recognizable symbol of Maryland's state government?Perhaps you would say the state flag, albeit with cluttered field and a design more appropriate to the finish line of an auto race. Or maybe the Great Seal, whose prominence was recently revived by free translations of the old Tuscan motto Fatti Maschii, etc.But just as recognizable is the Stetson hat worn by the Maryland State Police for nearly four decades. It's the hat that the Texas Rangers made famous as a symbol of law enforcement on the frontier, later adopted by a number of local and state police forces.
NEWS
May 11, 1998
The 37 troopers who have died in the line of duty will be honored by the Maryland State Police today as part of National Law Enforcement Officer's Memorial Week.The name of Raymond G. Armstead Jr., a state trooper killed in a car accident in March, will be added to a permanent memorial in a ceremony at 11: 30 a.m. at Maryland State Police headquarters, 1201 Reisterstown Road.Gov. Parris N. Glendening, Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, Col. David B. Mitchell of the Maryland State Police and the families of the officers will participate in the remembrance.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
More than 300 people banned from owning guns were able to buy them last year because the state police were overwhelmed with background check requests, police said Wednesday. People with histories of mental illness or convictions for violent misdemeanors, felons and fugitives were able to obtain and keep guns for three months or longer before state police reviewed the sales, according to records released by request to The Baltimore Sun. Maryland State Police finally cleared the backlog of background-check requests last week that began more than a year ago and once stood at more than 60,000, leading to months-long delays in investigating thousands of firearm transactions.
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