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Maryland State Police

NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2014
George B. Brosan, a former Maryland State Police superintendent from Annapolis, died Thursday, according to the state police. Brosan served as state police superintendent from Nov. 1, 1985 until April 22, 1987. Before leading the state police, Brosan had worked in law enforcement for 26 years, including with the New York Police Department, the U.S. Customs Service and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency, incuding as deputy assistant administrator of the DEA. Brosan was appointed Maryland State Police superintendent by Gov. Harry R. Hughes following the retirement of Wilbert T. Travers Jr. The current Maryland State Police superintendent, Col. Marcus L. Brown, said in a statement that Brosan served "with a diligent commitment to excellence.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser | February 21, 2014
Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown on Friday edged a small step further toward acceptance of eventual legalization of marijuana in Maryland, telling lawmakers he applauds the steps Colorado and Washington have taken to allow regulated use of the drug. Brown, a candidate for the Democratic nomination for governor, said he remains opposed to legalization now, saying Maryland should observe the results in those two states before taking that step. But he told the all-Democratic Baltimore House delegation that eventually "that may be the way to go. " "I applaud Colorado and Washington for moving ahead on this issue," Brown said.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan and Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2014
Law enforcement agencies across Maryland have launched a joint investigation to find the source of a deadly variant of heroin that has claimed dozens of lives in recent months and sent outreach workers scrambling to warn addicts. Authorities say the powerful mixture of heroin and the synthetic opiate fentanyl has also turned up in New England, New York and Pennsylvania. In Maryland, they say, they have been caught off guard by the scale of the problem. For months, health workers, drug users and police have caught glimpses of the cocktail and the damage it has caused.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
Timothy Virts, the man who allegedly killed the mother of his children and then fled to South Carolina with one daughter, has waived his right to extradition proceedings, authorities said Monday. Virts, 38, is waiting to be transported by Maryland authorities, South Carolina officials said Monday. Baltimore County police said they are working with police in South Carolina on his return but have not determined when he will handed over. "He'll be flown back," and the department is working with Maryland State Police's aviation unit, county police spokeswoman Elise Armacost said in an email.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2013
A Mount Airy man was arrested Monday on suspicion that he might have fatally stabbed his father after a violent fight spilled onto the lawn of the home that the pair shared. Joseph W. Pine, 31, of 706 Bridlewreath Way, was expected to be charged Tuesday with first and second degree murder according to Greg Shipley, a spokesman for the Maryland State Police. The suspect's father, Michael J. Pine, 63, was found slumped on his front porch at 3 p.m. Monday with "obvious trauma" to his upper torso, Shipley said.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
Maryland State Police reiterated their call Wednesday for witnesses to come forward in the unsolved slaying of a University of Maryland, Eastern Shore student a year ago. Edmond St. Clair, a 21-year-old junior biology major from Severn, was fatally stabbed on the UMES campus Feb. 16 last year. St. Clair, his brother and a friend were driving through campus to get food when they encountered several people, one of whom stabbed St. Clair when he stepped out of the car, police and his brother have said.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2013
A man was critically injured in Laurel on Friday morning when his car veered off Interstate 95 and crashed into the rear of a parked tractor trailer, Maryland State Police said. According to State Police Sgt. Anthony Riley, the driver was traveling northbound when his vehicle left the road, drifted onto the shoulder and struck the tractor trailer, which was parked on the shoulder. The driver's vehicle became trapped underneath the tractor trailer; fire and rescue officials removed the motorist from the vehicle with the Jaws of Life hydraulic rescue tool, Riley said.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
Marylanders have been rushing to buy guns at a rate of 1,000 a day over the past two weeks, hastening the pace of an unprecedented surge in gun sales. More than 102,000 gun purchase applications have been submitted so far this year - twice the number for all of 2011, state police said Monday. "It's like Prohibition," said Rick Kain, a gun owner from Howard County. "People want to get their guns before the law takes effect. " Maryland's tough new gun control law takes effect next week, banning the sale of assault-style rifles and requiring fingerprints and a license to buy a handgun.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel and Assistant editor, b | January 21, 2014
Curious to know exactly how it feels to jump into near-freezing water? Ask Josh Bronson - he's done it as a Polar Bear Plunge participant for the past two years and he's prepping for a third plunge this weekend. "It can feel like anything from taking ice and rubbing it all over your body [to] being stabbed repeatedly all over your body," said Bronson, 34, who lives in Westminster. The event benefits Special Olympics Maryland and features the majority of its plunges on Saturday at Sandy Point State Park in Annapolis (for more information, go to plungemd.com)
NEWS
By JULIE SCHARPER and JULIE SCHARPER,SUN REPORTER | February 15, 2006
Brake lights flashed, and dust scudded into the air. Then Donald Winding saw the car, which had slammed into the guardrail and spun into a grassy area, snapping a tree in two. Winding pulled over and ran down the embankment to the crumpled Taurus. The driver, a burly man in his 30s, stared ahead glassily, unseeing. His throat was swollen, his torso bent backward and his leg soaked with blood. Another man grabbed Winding's arm: "It's no use. He's already dead." But Winding, an operating room nurse and CPR instructor, sensed that the driver was still alive.
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