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By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2011
The Chesapeake Bay Foundation is concerned that state education officials have created a "major loophole" in the proposed regulations that would make environmental education part of every high-schooler's studies. In September, the Maryland State Board of Education voted unanimously to make environmental literacy part of the curriculum. However, it is not clear whether the vote made it a graduation requirement. The new regulation, which the board is receiving public comment on until Feb. 3, says that students must take a social studies course, a science course or an AP Environmental Science course in order to graduate.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
For Austin Bradburn, a fresh cup of coffee, brewed and delivered during the busy early-morning hallway rush, became an unlikely path into the complex social world of his high school. Bradburn and eight fellow Patapsco High School special-education students began brewing coffee in their Patriot Java Stop last December, an idea launched by their teachers as a way to give the students real-world skills for their life after high school. "Nothing we have ever done has given them so many gains," said Dana Evans, who has taught the students with Beth Gray for the past dozen years.
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NEWS
April 5, 2004
City students are expected to protest today outside the Circuit Court of Baltimore, 111 N. Calvert St., saying that the state is in violation of a court order to pay the city schools hundreds of millions more in annual funding. The 11 a.m. protest is being organized by students of the Algebra Project, a citywide peer-tutoring program. The students are protesting what they say is the state's failure to comply with Bradford vs. Maryland State Board of Education, in which city schools were found to be underfunded by at least $2,000 a student.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
A recent appointee to the Baltimore City school board resigned Thursday, according to the mayor's office, which said it had discovered inconsistencies in his resume. Anthony A. Hamilton said he held a master's degree from the Johns Hopkins University School of Education, according to biographical information on the board's website and a news release from Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Gov. Martin O'Malley announcing his appointment to the board in June. But a Hopkins spokeswoman said the university never awarded him a degree and a review of the school's database did not turn up a student by that name.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | August 5, 1996
Thirty-one Baltimore City schools and one Somerset County school have received approval for their improvement plans from the Maryland State Board of Education.The plans for improving school management, tying curricula to state standards and making record-keeping more consistent are required because the schools were identified in January as failing to meet or progress toward state standards.The plans approved last week will take effect immediately and be replaced next spring by long-range plans for improvement.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2002
An Ellicott City dentist charged Thursday with sexually assaulting one of his anesthetized female patients will continue to practice while the Maryland State Board of Dental Examiners decides what, if any, action to take against him. Evan Carmo DePadua, 37, turned himself in to Howard County police Thursday and was charged with a fourth-degree sex offense and second-degree assault, both misdemeanors. He was released later that day on his own recognizance. DePadua was back at his Centennial Square Office Park suite in the 10300 block of Baltimore National Pike the next morning to see patients.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 8, 2004
The Maryland State Board of Education is seeking candidates to fill a vacancy on the Baltimore City Board of School Commissioners that was created when former board member David J. Stone resigned last month. Candidates must be city residents older than age 18, and should have knowledge of or experience in the education of children with disabilities. The parent of a child with a disability would be considered to have sufficient knowledge and experience. The vacancy is for a term that ends June 30. After the expiration of the term, the appointee could seek a full three-year term.
NEWS
February 24, 1991
Churchville resident Ann B. Ramsay has been appointed to Harford Community College's board of trustees by Gov. William Donald Schaefer.She will serve the remainder of a five-year term, which began July 1990. Ramsay replaces Dr. Richard Streett, who left the board to takea position with the Maryland State Board for Community Colleges.Ramsay is retired from the Harford County public school system, where she served at a number of schools, most recently as principal ofDarlington Elementary School, from 1983 to 1989.
BUSINESS
August 19, 2006
Awards Kelly Hodge-Williams, executive director of Business Volunteers Unlimited Maryland, was given the 2006 Bravo! Entrepreneur Award by SmartWoman magazine. Karen Kurland, an insurance specialist with Thompson Financial Group, of Hunt Valley, has been named to the Excalibur Club of the Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Co. Nonprofits news Business Volunteers Unlimited Maryland announced that Naomi King was appointed as volunteer engagement coordinator for the organization. On the board Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. announced the appointment of H. Terry Hancock, a managing partner of Clifton Gunderson LLP, to the Maryland State Board of Public Accountancy.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 6, 2002
Supporters of Libertarian Party gubernatorial candidate Spear Lancaster delivered 35,600 petition signatures to the Maryland State Board of Elections yesterday in an effort to place the first minor-party candidate on the ballot for the state's top job since 1966. To appear on the ballot, state law requires independent and third-party candidates to collect valid signatures from 1 percent of the state's registered voters. About 2.7 million Maryland residents are registered as voters, meaning Lancaster needs about 27,000 valid signatures.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2012
The Maryland State Board of Education said Wednesday that Anne Arundel County government underfunded schools by nearly $12 million for the current fiscal year, striking down the county's appeal of an earlier ruling that it failed to meet a state-mandated funding requirement. The requirement, referred to as maintenance of effort, says that counties must give school systems at least the same level of funding per pupil as in the previous year, adjusted for student growth. In November, Anne Arundel Superintendent Kevin Maxwell indicated to the state board that the county had appropriated $556.1 million for the schools, about $12 million short of the maintenance-of-effort target.
NEWS
February 3, 2012
Kudos to the Maryland State Board of Education for its careful study of school discipline practices and for its plan to require Maryland school systems reduce out-of-school suspensions over the next three years ("State wants to curb student suspensions," Jan. 25). In effect, the state board is urging local school systems to use nonviolent transgressions as teachable opportunities, not suspendable ones. The state board's actions will guide principals who regularly face thorny discipline questions.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2011
Howard County Board of Education member Allen Dyer will find out next month whether he has thwarted his fellow members' attempt to oust him from the panel. An administration law judge said Thursday that he would hear Dyer's request to have the board's complaint against him dismissed. The school board passed a resolution June 9 to request that the Maryland State Board of Education remove Dyer, citing his repeated filing of lawsuits against the board and accusing him of, among other things, violating confidentiality agreements and bullying other board members.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2011
After strong objections surfaced from educators around the state, the Maryland State Board of Education delayed Tuesday any action on proposals to ensure that students who are suspended are dealt with fairly and quickly. Board members seemed unlikely to be swayed by opposition, but they asked state Education Department staff to gather more information from those who object to their proposals. The proposal would require a superintendent to decide within 10 days whether a student would be placed on long-term suspension or expelled.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2011
The Maryland State Board of Education wants to make sure school districts don't have zero-tolerance disciplinary policies similar to the one that may have contributed to the suicide of a Fairfax County, Va., teenager after he was suspended and subsequently transferred to a different school. Nick Stuban, a football player and Boy Scout, spent two months out of school after he admitted to buying one capsule of a legal substance and was then transferred to a new school where he had no support or friends.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2011
The Chesapeake Bay Foundation is concerned that state education officials have created a "major loophole" in the proposed regulations that would make environmental education part of every high-schooler's studies. In September, the Maryland State Board of Education voted unanimously to make environmental literacy part of the curriculum. However, it is not clear whether the vote made it a graduation requirement. The new regulation, which the board is receiving public comment on until Feb. 3, says that students must take a social studies course, a science course or an AP Environmental Science course in order to graduate.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV | June 7, 2009
The Maryland Court of Special Appeals has ruled against a former chief business officer for the Howard County school system who was dismissed by then-Superintendent John R. O'Rourke in September 2003. Bruce M. Venter was fired after failing to inform O'Rourke, top-ranking administrators and the board that construction of Marriotts Ridge High School was off schedule. Venter sued the school system in 2003. Before the Court of Special Appeals' decision, Venter had lost decisions by the Circuit Court for Howard County, the Maryland State Board of Education and the Board of Education of Howard County.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | November 13, 2001
Dr. Alan S. Exler, an oral surgeon, teacher and Sinai Hospital's chief of dentistry, died yesterday of pancreatic cancer at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. He was 51 and lived in Owings Mills. An assistant professor at the University of Maryland's School of Dentistry, he was a classroom instructor and hands-on teacher at its downtown Baltimore clinic. In his 24 years in the profession, he founded dental offices in Glen Burnie and Bel Air and also practiced in Eastpoint and Pikesville.
NEWS
December 28, 2010
The prescription developer David Tufaro writes for those interested in serving as Baltimore's mayor is based, in part, on an outdated diagnosis of public education options available in city schools ( "A reform agenda for Baltimore's next mayor," Dec. 27). Mr. Tufaro's view that education reform in Baltimore is incremental suggests that he has missed dramatic, positive developments in city schools since leaving the Maryland State Board of Education in 2008. City schools CEO Andrés Alonso and the Baltimore Board of School Commissioners, with steady and strong support from City Hall and Annapolis, have fundamentally changed what it means to be a student, parent, teacher or principal in city schools.
NEWS
July 29, 2010
My service on the Maryland State Board of Education overlapped with Jim Campbell's service on the City School Board. I am writing to correct some important facts, but, first of all, I agree that CEO Andrés Alonso's forcefulness and sense of mission have been very positive for the city schools, and the schools are headed in the right direction, albeit far too slowly. In "City school system ready to take the next step" (Commentary, July 22), Jim Campbell points out the successful opening of charter schools in the city, but prior to Mr. Alonso's arrival, the city school board, including Mr. Campbell, right after the state charter law was passed in 2003, strenuously fought new charter school applications and, most importantly, their full funding as required by state law. They did so to the point of opposing the full funding in court all the way to Maryland's top court.
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