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By DAVID HILL | June 18, 2012
ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) — The Maryland State Archives collection is among the largest in the country with nearly 400 years of history, including Colonial-era paintings, keepsakes of the state's governors, and thousands of land, court and genealogy records. With all that history, the Archives has run out of space. The agency first filled its Annapolis headquarters to capacity in 2000, then leased and filled a warehouse. It leased a second warehouse and a third before brokering a deal to store some of its property at the Baltimore City Archives.
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NEWS
Peter Crispino and For The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
In the 2.3 acres surrounding Asbury Broadneck United Methodist Church, a subtle link to local history lies in a cemetery that dates back nearly 200 years. At least 1,800 graves - few with headstones, many belonging to former slaves - are on the grounds, each bearing a story and a key to the past. For the past 15 months, a dedicated team from the church has worked to identify each person buried there and perhaps even discover their stories. "It's important that we know who helped pave the way for us, because if this generation does not do it, I don't know what the next generation will do," said Elinor Thompson, who has led the effort.
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NEWS
November 30, 1990
The Maryland State Archives in Annapolis has made available an important new reference resource for historians and genealogists.The resource, "An Historical List of Public Officials of Maryland," has the names of nearly 32,000 Maryland public officials from 1632 to the present and will be of enormous value to scholars and researchers interested in the history of Maryland.The book is the first volume in a new series of the Archives of Maryland collection of transcribed documents and indexes that was published from 1883 to 1972.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Karen A. Stuart, a Library of Congress archivist who earlier had been head librarian at the Maryland Historical Society where she also was associate editor of the Maryland Historical Magazine, died of cancer Aug. 19 at Stella Maris Hospice. She was 59. "As head librarian at the Maryland Historical Society, Karen always took her job seriously, trying hard to help researchers who sometimes had fairly arcane questions of projects," said Robert J. Brugger, an author and Maryland historian who is a senior editor at the Johns Hopkins University Press.
NEWS
March 9, 1996
The Maryland State Archives has named new members to its search room advisory committee: Geneva Sparks of Baltimore; V. L. Skinner Jr. of Brookville; Jane McWilliams and Lois Green Carr, both of Annapolis; Eleanor M. V. Cook of Silver Spring; and Mary K. Meyer of Mount Airy.The committee meets twice a year with staff of the archives to discuss operation of the public search room used by researchers, genealogists and others.Pub Date: 3/09/96
NEWS
March 18, 2007
The cornerstone for the Annapolis State House was laid in March 1772 by the governor of the colony, Robert Eden. It was a propitious period in the thriving seaport, poised on the edge of revolution. Yet the trans-Atlantic slave trade was a regular presence, too, with human cargo disembarking from the docks a short walk from the State House site. The project was unfinished in 1783 when Annapolis was briefly the national capital and Congress met here, under a leaky roof. The handsome dome that we see today was not done until 1788.
NEWS
April 11, 1991
Space is still available for the all-day conference on "Maryland andthe Civil War," from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. April 20 at the Joint Hearing Room of the Legislative Service Building in Annapolis.The conference, sponsored by the Maryland State Archives, will assess the state of knowledge about Maryland and the Civil War and will feature such experts on the subject as Ross Kimmel, William L. Brown, James Walker and Brian Pohanka. Pohanka was a consultant to the film "Glory."Registration for the conference is $25 -- $20 for students -- which includes a box lunch and attendance at a reception following the program in the honor of Phebe R. Jacobsen, a senior archivist who recently retired.
NEWS
February 13, 2005
State Archives taking applications for internships The Maryland State Archives is accepting applications for its summer intern program. The internships are open to high school and college students attending Maryland schools or from Maryland attending out-of-state schools. These are paid internships that include experience and training in archival records management, digital imaging and historical research methods. The 10-week program runs from June 15 to Aug. 23. Qualifications include academic excellence, with an interest preferred in history, archival science, library science, computer science, American studies or related fields.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2000
Most people know Phebe R. Jacobsen as the archivist who helped Alex Haley find his roots. They've heard how she was on duty the day in 1967 when Haley walked into the Maryland State Archives searching for records of his ancestor, Kunta Kinte. They've heard how she found the handwritten port ledger noting the "cargo of choice, healthy slaves" from Gambia on the Lord Ligonier, how that record formed a pivotal link in Haley's Pulitzer Prize-winning "Roots." They may even know about the long friendship she maintained with the writer and his family.
NEWS
January 22, 2006
1648: remarkable Margaret Brent Talk about audacity. On Jan. 21, 1648, Margaret Brent, then 47, appeared before the Maryland General Assembly and requested two votes: one for herself as a landowner and one as Lord Baltimore's attorney. Her request was denied, but she is remembered as a remarkable woman of the 17th century. Brent and other family members came to the Maryland colony empowered with a land grant, hailing from a landed Catholic family in Gloucestershire, England. Her single status was unusual because in Maryland she entered a society in which men outnumbered women about six to one. The governor, Leonard Calvert, did not fare well during a period of religious strife.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
Ben Blake envisions a future where academics from New York and Boston will catch Amtrak trains to Baltimore's Penn Station with the singular purpose of becoming immersed in one of the country's most compelling archives on the gay rights movement. Blake, head of special collections at the University of Baltimore's Langsdale Library, thinks the foundation of that archive arrived in December, when volunteers with the city's Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center brought boxes and boxes of old newspapers and legislative memos, photographs and fliers.
NEWS
By Alain Leray | March 7, 2014
Perhaps the darkest episode in human history, the Holocaust has been at the center of Jewish and world consciousness for over six decades. In the spring of 1940, France was invaded and occupied by Nazi troops. Both my parents and grandparents, who were living in Paris at the time, fled into hiding to survive. During this time, SNCF, the company operating the French railroad system, and the parent company of my current employer, SNCF America, was placed under Nazi command according to Article 13 of the French-German Armistice agreement of June 1940.
NEWS
January 31, 2014
Sunday, Feb. 2 World Wetland's Day World Mission Society Church of God and the Chesapeake Children's Museum will host activities for children, including nature walks, interactive games and projects to help children understand the importance of water conservation, from noon to 4 p.m. at the Chesapeake Children's Museum, 25 Silopanna Road, Annapolis. Cost is $5; Free for accompanying adults. Information: 410-990-1993. Tuesday, Feb. 4 Luncheon The Retired Officers' Wives' Club holds a luncheon at 11 a.m. at Club Meade, 6600 Mapes Road.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2013
It's a piece of history that many in Maryland want to forget: an underfunded, overcrowded, state-run mental hospital where African-American patients lived in squalid conditions, were given few helpful treatments and were made the subjects of experiments — possibly against their will. Crownsville Hospital Center was eventually integrated and became a modern mental health facility. But for decades — from its founding in 1911 to the 1960s — the now-shuttered hospital offered substandard care to poor, sick, black Marylanders, according to historians, advocates and state officials.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2013
Video crews from C-SPAN are filming in Annapolis this week, highlighting the history of the state capital for programs that will air on the cable channel in September. Mayor Josh Cohen said the public affairs network's focus on Annapolis is "a really cool promotional opportunity" for the city to be seen by a national audience. The segments are part of C-SPAN's 2013 Local Cities Tour, in which producers and crews are visiting more than two dozen small and mid-size cities to document contributions to America.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2013
Edward C. Papenfuse, an Annapolis icon who has presided over the Maryland State Archives for almost 38 years, announced this week that he will retire as of Nov. 1. Papenfuse, a leading authority on Maryland history, announced his intentions at Monday's meeting of the state Hall of Records Commission. A decade into his tenure as state archivist and commissioner of land patents, the archives moved to the building it now occupies on Rowe Boulevard in Annapolis. In 2005, to commemorate Papenfuse's 30th anniversary in his job, the Board of Public Works named the building for him. A white-bearded man with a jovial manner, Papenfuse has long been a familiar figure at Maryland historical commemorations and other public events.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2013
Edward C. Papenfuse, an Annapolis icon who has presided over the Maryland State Archives for almost 38 years, announced this week that he will retire as of Nov. 1. Papenfuse, a leading authority on Maryland history, announced his intentions at Monday's meeting of the state Hall of Records Commission. A decade into his tenure as state archivist and commissioner of land patents, the archives moved to the building it now occupies on Rowe Boulevard in Annapolis. In 2005, to commemorate Papenfuse's 30th anniversary in his job, the Board of Public Works named the building for him. A white-bearded man with a jovial manner, Papenfuse has long been a familiar figure at Maryland historical commemorations and other public events.
NEWS
By DAVID HILL | June 18, 2012
ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) — The Maryland State Archives collection is among the largest in the country with nearly 400 years of history, including Colonial-era paintings, keepsakes of the state's governors, and thousands of land, court and genealogy records. With all that history, the Archives has run out of space. The agency first filled its Annapolis headquarters to capacity in 2000, then leased and filled a warehouse. It leased a second warehouse and a third before brokering a deal to store some of its property at the Baltimore City Archives.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2010
As he prepared to resign his commission as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army, Gen. George Washington traveled to Annapolis and while staying at Mann's Tavern, put his thoughts on paper. His Dec. 23, 1783 address to Congress, which was then meeting in the Old Senate Chamber in what is today the State House, concluded with a farewell to public life. Preparing to resign his commission as the Continental Army's commander in chief, Gen. George Washington put his thoughts on paper while staying at Mann's Tavern in Annapolis.
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