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Tim Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2014
The Senate moved Saturday to curtail commercial wind turbines across much of the state to protect a prized naval air station in southern Maryland, brushing aside arguments the curb would kill a $200 million energy project on the Eastern Shore. By a vote of 31-16, senators approved a 13-month moratorium on tall turbines within 56 miles of Naval Air Station Patuxent River.  Supporters said they feared a proposed Eastern Shore project could lead to cutbacks in operations at the base, the region's economic engine.  They argued a delay was needed to finish a study of whether such projects could operate without interfering with the station's radar.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
When it comes to picking their next state senator, many Harford County voters will choose between two familiar names. The Democrat is Mary-Dulany James, a four-term state delegate whose father, William S. James, was a Maryland Senate president. The Republican is Bob Cassilly, who served on Bel Air's board of town commissioners and on the Harford County Council — and whose two brothers are also running for office in Harford this year. Both James and Cassilly believe they have the experience and vision to represent Harford's interests in Annapolis, replacing Nancy Jacobs, a Republican who is retiring after 16 years in the Senate.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2013
Senate Majority Leader Rob Garagiola, who was elected to the Maryland Senate in 2002 as its youngest member and appeared destined for higher office, said Thursday that he is leaving the General Assembly to return to private life. Garagiola, a Montgomery County Democrat, said his resignation will take effect Sept. 1. Under Maryland's Constitution, he will be replaced by a candidate chosen by his party's local central committee. Now 40, Garagiola was 30 when he defeated the last Republican senator to represent increasingly Democratic Montgomery County.
NEWS
October 6, 2014
This fall, Maryland voters will have a constitutional amendment on the ballot of interest to all state residents, taxpayers and drivers: Question 1, which will create a "lockbox" for state transportation funds. The amendment language states: "Transportation Trust Funds may be used for non-transportation related purposes or transferred to the general fund or a special fund only if the Governor declares a fiscal emergency and the General Assembly approves legislation, by a three-fifths vote of both houses, concurring with the use or transfer of the funds.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2012
Four candidates for U.S. Senate wrangled over the economy, budget deficits and the state's controversial ballot initiatives in a Wednesday radio debate that stressed deep ideological differences on how to deal with the nation's pressing problems. Incumbent Democrat Ben Cardin, who is widely favored to win the race, and Republican challenger Daniel Bongino offered vastly different approaches to nearly every question. Cardin called for more investments in education and a mix of spending cuts and taxes to address the nation's budget woes.
NEWS
Erin Cox and Timothy Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2014
The plan to raise Maryland's minimum wage to $10.10 an hour cleared Maryland's Senate Saturday afternoon. Although lawmakers must still work out details on who would be exempted from the hike and how long it would take to implement, compromises reached by key lawmakers and Gov. Martin O'Malley earlier in the week suggest the Senate version will become law. That plan, approved by senators in a 34-13 vote, calls for incrementally raising the...
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
The Maryland Senate approved a bill Tuesday that would prohibit discrimination against transgender people. The Fairness for All Marylanders Act, which passed the Senate, 32-15, now goes to the House of Delegates. The measure would expand Maryland's anti-discrimination laws to protect transgender people in employment, housing, access to credit and public accommodations. Four localities — Baltimore City and Baltimore, Howard and Montgomery counties — already bar discrimination based on gender identity, but there is not a state law against it. "I think we're ready to move ahead and be progressive," said Sen. Delores G. Kelly, a Baltimore County Democrat, who argued that transgender civil rights ought to be protected statewide.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2012
The state Senate voted Thursday to significantly raise taxes on Marylanders earning half a million dollars or more — prompting complaints that liberals were bent on launching class warfare in the state. The Senate's vote to adopt what is being dubbed a "millionaire's tax" came after some liberal-leaning senators said they would refuse to support a smaller, across-the-board increase in income taxes unless the wealthy took a special hit. The chamber was considering a plan to raise taxes on most Maryland taxpayers by up to a quarter of a percentage point — a proposal that eventually passed by a vote of 26-20.
NEWS
By Frank A. DeFilippo | May 13, 1993
TAKE a good look at the makeup of the Maryland Senate. Many of the faces you see won't be around very much longer.By dint of retirement and reapportionment, the Senate could lose at least one-third of its 47 members. Still others will depart in the normal evolutionary process of running for higher office.As the numbers crunch now, at least 16 senators have announced their retirements or have left their futures in the Senate uncertain. And every departing senator is likely to generate a corresponding vacancy in the House of Delegates as delegates attempt to move up to the Senate.
NEWS
June 7, 2003
Margaret Jefferson "Jeff" Jackson, a Maryland state senator from 1953 to 1955 and Democratic activist, died in her sleep of a circulatory ailment Sunday at Pickersgill Retirement Community in Towson. She was 94. Born Margaret E. Jefferson in Chestertown, she graduated from Washington College in 1929 and went to work at a women's clothing store owned by her father. After his death, she ran the store until 1939, when she married Omar D. "Gus" Crothers Jr., and moved to Walnut Lane in Elkton.
NEWS
August 26, 2014
Providing incentives to our best teachers to instruct our students with the greatest needs will improve these children's education. Rewarding teachers for their exceptional efforts in improving outcomes for these students will help keep them in the classroom ( "Time to talk tenure," Aug. 24). We already do that in Maryland. A teacher with the highest performance evaluation rating for classroom work can be assisted in the repayment of academic debt with a Nancy Grasmick Teacher Award.
SPORTS
By Jonathan Munshaw, The Baltimore Sun and By Jonathan Munshaw, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2014
Liz Sweeney of Timonium used to race her kayak while living in New York City. At the time, Sweeney would practice in the Hudson River, though public access to waterways was hard to find. Now, she is able to get up early and take her kayak to Loch Raven Fishing Center in Baltimore County, as she did on a recent day. Although she no longer races, she still uses her kayak for exercise. Elsewhere at the fishing center that day, minutes after Sweeney got out of the water, Rick Warner of Carney came in on his fishing boat following a morning excursion.
NEWS
June 10, 2014
Connie DeJuliis, a candidate for the Maryland Senate, probably missed as many or more votes than any other candidate for state office when she served in the House of Delegates ( "DeJuliis is sliming Brochin," June 7). Has The Sun failed to do its investigative homework? Or are you for some reason giving her a pass on this vital measure of how voters want their candidates to carry out the work of the offices to which we elect them? Robert Gifford, Timonium - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2014
David R. Brinkley has no problem with being called an establishment Republican. He's the party's leader in the Maryland Senate, a master of the state budget process and a pragmatist adept at bringing tax dollars back from Democratic-dominated Annapolis to Frederick and Carroll counties. But the 20-year lawmaker is struggling to beat back an aggressive challenge from the tea party wing of the GOP. Del. Michael J. Hough contends that Brinkley is not ideologically pure enough for the General Assembly's 4th District.
NEWS
May 8, 2014
I read with great interest the recent commentary, "Keeping Baltimore afloat" (May 6). The gifted and talented programs in the Baltimore City Schools will not be cut or reduced. Sen. Nathaniel J. McFadden, Baltimore The writer, a Democrat, represents District 45 in the Maryland Senate. - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2014
Melony Griffith is in District Heights making her pitch to voters. The veteran Prince George's County delegate is telling them about her 15 years of legislative experience, her expertise on state pension issues and her plans to boost the economy. There's one thing Griffith is conspicuously not mentioning: her opponent, Ulysses S. Currie's, trial on corruption charges and subsequent censure by the Maryland Senate. For the first time in 12 years, Currie, still a towering Annapolis figure, is facing a Democratic primary challenger.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,Sun Reporter | February 27, 2008
Efforts to get mixed martial arts sanctioned in Maryland appear on track after a senate committee showed no signs of opposition yesterday to a bill that would give the state athletic commission regulatory power over the sport. The committee on education, health and environmental affairs likely will decide by Friday whether to forward the bill to a vote by the entire state senate, said sponsor Joan Carter Conway, a Baltimore Democrat. But no one spoke against the legislation at yesterday's hearing in Annapolis.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2013
Costco and the U.S. Women's Chamber of Commerce are among more than 70 businesses and groups that support raising the minimum wage in Maryland, according Raise Maryland, a group advocating for a higher wage. "We pay a starting hourly wage of $11.50 in all states where we do business, and we are still able to keep our overhead costs low," Craig Jelinek, Costco's president and CEO, said in a statement. "Instead of minimizing wages, we know it's a lot more profitable in the long term to minimize employee turnover and maximize employee productivity, commitment and loyalty.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2014
State Sen. James N. Robey says there was no grand ambition, no plan to ascend to where he now sits as majority leader of the Maryland Senate, or to have made the unusual leaps from Howard County police chief to county executive to legislator. Things happened, he said, one thing led to another, people egged on a sometimes reluctant candidate. He's 73 now, and a couple of weeks ago, because it was Maryland Day, he put on a black-white-red-and-gold state flag necktie to go with the white shirt and gray suit and stepped out of his overnight accommodations at the Calvert House on State Circle to begin one of his last days of his last legislative session.
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