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by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2011
A Fall dining promotion will feature Maryland seafood on restaurant tables, not only in Maryland, but in Delaware, Washington D.C. and Pennsylvania. The Maryland Department of Natural Resources today announced the new partnership and details about the dining promotion.   Described as a celebration of Maryland seafood, From the Bay, For the Bay, will run from Oct. 2-9, with more than 150 restaurants having already commmitted, and as many as 300 anticipated. A website launched today.
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ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2013
The Gathering , Baltimore's traveling food truck rally, is on the road again this weekend for rallies on Friday night and Sunday afternoon. The rallies, which generally circulate among a handful of locations in Baltimore City, are headed out to ... "THE COUNTY. " Friday's food truck event will be held at Metro Crossing, a just-completed luxury apartment complex at  Metro Centre in Owings Mills. The event, which runs from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m., will include beer, wine, live music and a chance to chat with some of the folks at Metro Crossing.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2011
A reader responded to our recent roundup of classic Maryland crab houses: "Take a trip to Glen Burnie and find Seaside on Crain Highway. Best crabs in town. … You need to move around to the other side of town. " In a follow-up conversation, the reader said, "Seaside is not a fancy place, but they are always crowded because so many people know how fantastic their steamed crabs are. They also have a full menu, and everything else we have tried has been delicious: crab soup, salads, onion rings and other crab dishes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2013
Now in its second season, the state's "True Blue" seafood certification program has increased the roster of participating restaurants from 26 to 150, according to Steve Vilnit of the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. The state launched the labeling and marketing initiative in 2012 to help encourage restaurants to carry Maryland crab meat. Not everyone needed encouragement, though. "We're an 80-year-old Baltimore business, so why wouldn't we support a local industry," said Sebastien Trossman, the executive chef at Alonso's, one of the newer restaurants on the True Blue roster.
NEWS
September 26, 1997
GROCERY STORES refusing to carry Chesapeake seafood because of Pfiesteria fear aren't helping matters.Reducing stocks of local seafood if buyers are not buying is understandable. But it is self-serving and irresponsible to refuse to stock bay products when scientists -- including the foremost expert on the Pfiesteria microbe -- say it is perfectly safe to eat a healthy-looking fish, crab or oyster. Some groceries have gone so far as to post signs saying they no longer buy Maryland seafood, which amounts to announcing, ''Maryland seafood is unsafe.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | April 24, 1996
Desserts are low fat, but luscious as everWhat do upside-down apple pie, peach and tart cherry shortcakes and chocolate mousse a l'orange have in common, besides being scrumptious desserts? They're all low-fat -- and -- there are 147 more recipes where those come from, in the "The Eating Well Dessert Cookbook" (Eating Well Books, $15.95). Recipes are extensively tested and have just 3 to 7 grams of fat. A profile of Chesapeake Bay, a guide to its edible denizens such as blue crabs, rockfish and oysters, along with 12 recipes are part of an expanded brochure on Maryland seafood.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Douglas M. Birch, Liz Bowie and Marcia Myers contributed to this article | September 24, 1997
Despite repeated assurances by Gov. Parris N. Glendening and leading scientists that Maryland seafood is safe to eat, some of the state's grocery chains have adopted corporate policies of refusing to buy it.Giant Food Inc., a 174-store regional chain that is the dominant grocer in Maryland, has bought no Maryland rockfish since Sept. 6.Valu Foods, a 21-store Baltimore chain, has bought no Maryland seafood of any kind for three weeks.Graul's, a small, upscale chain of four stores, has posted signs informing customers that none of its seafood comes from Chesapeake Bay waters.
NEWS
March 30, 2007
Elvera M. Crispens, a homemaker and Maryland seafood cook, died of kidney failure Monday at the Levindale Hebrew Convalescent Home and Hospital. The Arbutus resident was 86. Born Elvera M. Babka in Baltimore and raised on Jackson Street, she attended St. Mary Star of the Sea Parochial School. In 1946, she married Kenneth Crispens, a retired Baltimore City Police Department lieutenant, who survives her. She enjoyed duckpin bowling and playing the slot machines at Charles Town, W.Va. She was also an accomplished cook and made traditional Maryland seafood dishes as well as sour beef and dumplings.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2005
Maryland seafood processors and other seasonal businesses hoping for federal intervention to forestall a summer labor crisis are going to have to wait a little longer after legislation offering relief failed to come up for a vote yesterday in the U.S. Senate. The bill, which Maryland Democrat Barbara A. Mikulski introduced as an amendment to the supplemental spending bill for the war in Iraq, would let seasonal nonagricultural workers from other countries return to jobs in the United States, despite a ceiling on their numbers imposed under the visa program known as H2B. The program - which since 1990 has allowed 66,000 into the United States each year - has been a lifeline for the Eastern Shore's seafood industry, which has been besieged by cheap imports and struggles to compete for workers with better-paying industries.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2011
In an innovative weeklong dining promotion, fresh Maryland Seafood will be featured on the menus of restaurants stretching from Philadelphia to Northern Virginia. From the Bay, For the Bay: Dine Out was conceived and is being managed by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources Fisheries Service. "We are incredibly pleased by the enthusiasm surrounding our Dine Out celebration," said Governor Martin O'Malley. "Restaurants from across the mid-Atlantic have joined this effort to promote our Maryland seafood and that speaks volumes about the quality and variety that we have to offer.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2013
The Bounty of the Bay dinner is Thursday. The dinner moves this year to the Rockfish in Annapolis. Hosted by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, the dinner celebrates Maryland seafood and the watermen, retailers and restaurants who bring it to consumers. The five-course dinner from Rockfish chef Chad Wells includes both established favorites like local oysters and striped bass and overlooked species like spiny dogfish and blue catfish. The $60 ticket includes a raw-bar reception.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2012
From the Bay, For the Bay: Dine Out, a week-long restaurant promotion celebrating Chesapeake Bay seafood, begins on Saturday and runs through Oct. 13. Participating restaurants from Philadelphia to Norfolk, Va., are donating $1 for every Maryland seafood dinner sold during the promotion to the Oyster Recovery Partnership , an Annapolis-based non-profit that works to replenish the Chesapeake Bay oyster population.  Baltimore restaurants participating...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2012
Would you rather be loved or respected? The Mo's group of seafood restaurants and markets gets a lot of the former and not much of the latter. When Anthony Bourdain chose Mo's to represent Baltimore dining on a 2009 "No Reservations" episode, Baltimore foodies were annoyed. Why Mo's, of all places? Mo's might not be where you'd send someone to form a lasting impression of Maryland seafood. But two locations near the Inner Harbor have outlived a number of highfalutin seafood restaurants that weren't as smart about catering to tourist tastes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2011
What is it we want from Phillips? Like it or not, the restaurant is the city's unofficial headquarters for Chesapeake seafood. For the last three decades, more visitors to Baltimore likely received their first crab cake from Phillips in Harborplace than anywhere else in Baltimore. I think we want to know that Phillips is representing us well. If, like many, you've found yourself uneasy about how Phillips was performing in this ambassadorial role, I've got some encouraging news for you. Phillips' move across the harbor last fall from the Light Street Pavilion to a new home at the Power Plant has done it a world of good.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2011
Remember the Maryland crab cake? It no longer exists. It has been replaced, in the hearts and appetites of Baltimore restaurant diners, by a thing called the jumbo lump crab cake. Tastes change. The crab cake once was a humble second-day meal, composed of the gleanings of a crab feast - flavorful claw meat and, if you were lucky, unbroken pieces of backfin. The restaurant crab cake of today, almost without exception, is made with jumbo lump, a packing category that didn't even exist a few generations ago. And there's another major difference: In the old days, the crab cake served in Baltimore restaurants was made from Maryland crab meat.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2011
The redevelopment of the old Chesapeake Restaurant space is moving forward with a new team after restaurateur Qayum Karzai left the project in July. At the time, developer Ernst Valery said he was looking for a team to run the project's restaurant component, which will occupy the ground level of the historic property. Valery has found that team, and he's on it. The husband-and-wife team behind Philadelphia's Milk & Honey Market, Mauro Daigle and Annie Baum-Stein will join Valery and his wife, Dana, to complete the project.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Frank Roylance contributed to this article | September 27, 1997
The Glendening administration said yesterday that it will more than double its funding of a marketing campaign intended to reassure Pfiesteria-wary Marylanders about the safety of Chesapeake Bay seafood.Gov. Parris N. Glendening said he is setting aside $500,000 for the campaign because "we must do more to increase consumer confidence" in Maryland seafood.The money will be a "deficiency appropriation," meaning the governor may spend the money now and ask the General Assembly for approval in January.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2012
From the Bay, For the Bay: Dine Out, a week-long restaurant promotion celebrating Chesapeake Bay seafood, begins on Saturday and runs through Oct. 13. Participating restaurants from Philadelphia to Norfolk, Va., are donating $1 for every Maryland seafood dinner sold during the promotion to the Oyster Recovery Partnership , an Annapolis-based non-profit that works to replenish the Chesapeake Bay oyster population.  Baltimore restaurants participating...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2011
In an innovative weeklong dining promotion, fresh Maryland Seafood will be featured on the menus of restaurants stretching from Philadelphia to Northern Virginia. From the Bay, For the Bay: Dine Out was conceived and is being managed by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources Fisheries Service. "We are incredibly pleased by the enthusiasm surrounding our Dine Out celebration," said Governor Martin O'Malley. "Restaurants from across the mid-Atlantic have joined this effort to promote our Maryland seafood and that speaks volumes about the quality and variety that we have to offer.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2011
As the shadows lengthen in Sandy Point State Park next Sunday afternoon, and another Maryland Seafood Festival winds down, six people will take the stage before a cheering crowd and press against a table piled high with steamed crabs. The judge will give a signal. The contestants will start snatching up crustaceans, tearing them apart and tossing shells aside. And the Cantler's Riverside Inn Crab-Picking Contest will be under way. It's a noisy, colorful spectacle, complete with trash-talking rivals, flying elbows and bellowing fans.
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