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NEWS
November 20, 1990
Just as we suspected, critics rushed to pass (negative) judgment on the Linowes commission's tax-reform suggestions even before they had laid eyes on the yet-to-be approved final report. They had their minds made up; they felt no need to study the document before rejecting the panel's recommendations.Such myopic thinking poses a danger to Maryland's future development. Ignoring the stark realities that the Linowes commission identified could lead to a declining revenue base, increasing demands for social services and a frightening gap between the state's haves and its have-nots.
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NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun reporter | November 2, 2007
The fate of Gov. Martin O'Malley's plan to overhaul Maryland's tax structure remained unclear yesterday after legislators held marathon hearings on his $1.1 billion package. Liberal groups, religious organizations, labor unions and others came out in force to support the plan, which they said would make Maryland's tax structure more progressive. O'Malley has proposed a series of increases, cuts and expansions to the sales, tobacco, income and property taxes. Small-business owners and their advocates were at least as vigorous in their arguments that the package would make Maryland less-competitive and hurt the economy.
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NEWS
By Robert Timberg and Robert Timberg,Sun Staff Writer | February 12, 1994
Gov. William Donald Schaefer carried his campaign for a cigarette tax increase to a key legislative panel yesterday in an effort to breathe life into an initiative gasping for air.The governor said that his proposed 25-cents-a-pack tax boost would greatly reduce cigarette smoking, thus curtailing health risks, while providing $70 million for a variety of popular programs.If the increase is enacted, Maryland's tax would jump to 61 cents, giving the state the second highest levy in the nation, trailing only the 65 cents imposed by the District of Columbia.
NEWS
September 20, 2007
While many of the specifics of Martin O'Malley's ambitious budget proposal have not yet been revealed, its full purpose is now apparent: The governor aims not only to resolve the state's structural deficit but also to make Maryland's tax system a bit fairer than it is today. He will no doubt catch much heat for daring to recommend tax increases (and even his supporters ought not pass final judgment until the plan is fully vetted), but it's clear the governor is fundamentally on the right track.
NEWS
December 5, 1996
Virtual taxes only seem too highThe Sun (Nov. 27) reported that business at soup kitchens is thriving. At the same time, business and political leaders in Maryland are clamoring for a reduction in the state personal income tax rate.They say that Maryland is perceived to have high taxes, and that cutting the personal income tax will change this perception and stimulate economic growth.Most of those business and political leaders also agree that, in reality, Maryland's taxes are not high when compared with those of other states.
NEWS
March 24, 2004
HOUSE SPEAKER Michael E. Busch has proposed a $670 million package of tax increases and reforms that would, among other things, raise the sales tax by a penny and decrease property taxes statewide by 8.2 cents per $100 in assessed value. It's an ambitious plan that would balance the budget and ensure Maryland's Thornton plan for education could move forward. It's the best idea yet for solving the state's long-term budget woes and therefore deserves serious consideration. Yet, within hours of its unveiling, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. already was talking veto.
NEWS
September 20, 2007
While many of the specifics of Martin O'Malley's ambitious budget proposal have not yet been revealed, its full purpose is now apparent: The governor aims not only to resolve the state's structural deficit but also to make Maryland's tax system a bit fairer than it is today. He will no doubt catch much heat for daring to recommend tax increases (and even his supporters ought not pass final judgment until the plan is fully vetted), but it's clear the governor is fundamentally on the right track.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | October 21, 1994
There are a great many Maryland voters who like Ellen Sauerbrey's promise to cut personal income taxes by 24 percent.Some believe she could do it, and it would fatten their paychecks. Others figure she'd get some of what she wants, and at least slow down the growth of state government.But would the tax cuts have the impact the Republican gubernatorial candidate wants? Would they stimulate the economy and make Maryland more attractive to development?While some economists and the Maryland Chamber of Commerce answer with an emphatic yes, other analysts interviewed by The Sun warn that proposals like Mrs. Sauerbrey's could have the opposite effect.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | September 9, 1999
Anti-smoking groups in Maryland and neighboring states are asking the Federal Trade Commission to investigate whether cigarette makers have violated antitrust laws by cutting prices at stores near Maryland's border to boost cross-border cigarette sales.Tobacco companies deny any such discounting and say the anti-smoking groups created a cross-border smuggling problem by pushing for an increase in Maryland's tax.Maryland raised its cigarette tax July 1 from 36 cents to 66 cents per pack, the highest rate in the mid-Atlantic region.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie | October 20, 1992
Biotech executives want tax laws revisedIf the state wants to attract new biotechnology companies and keep the ones it has, say biotech company chief executives, it better take a hard look at its tax laws.The CEOs are arguing that they should get the same exemption for laboratory equipment that other companies get for manufacturing equipment. Hans Mueller cites his own company, Nova Pharmaceutical (now Scios Nova), as an example. For the past three years, Nova has paid about $340,000 a year in personal property tax on its laboratory equipment.
NEWS
December 24, 2006
Tax reform can help state meet its needs An overhaul of Maryland's tax structure is long overdue ("Md. tax reform gains ground," Dec. 19). As Marylanders, we have collectively demanded many things from our state government - a great public school education for our children, affordable higher education, a cleaner Chesapeake Bay, a better transportation system including better mass transportation and a program to sustain farm and forested land. Doing all of these things costs more money than the state is collecting in revenue.
NEWS
March 24, 2004
HOUSE SPEAKER Michael E. Busch has proposed a $670 million package of tax increases and reforms that would, among other things, raise the sales tax by a penny and decrease property taxes statewide by 8.2 cents per $100 in assessed value. It's an ambitious plan that would balance the budget and ensure Maryland's Thornton plan for education could move forward. It's the best idea yet for solving the state's long-term budget woes and therefore deserves serious consideration. Yet, within hours of its unveiling, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. already was talking veto.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | January 20, 2002
FOUR YEARS ago Gov. Parris N. Glendening called the 10 percent state income-tax cut "the single most important step we can take to make Maryland more competitive and create more jobs." So why does he want to delay phasing in the measure, which has already taken too long to become reality? Since Glendening took office, Maryland has gone from being a shoo-in for the annual prizes for high taxation awarded by the financial magazines to actually putting some suspense into the process. In a fund-raising letter last fall, potential gubernatorial candidate Robert L. Ehrlich repeated the slur that Maryland is a "tax hell" compared with other states.
NEWS
August 20, 2001
NOW IS THE TIME for all good Maryland tax-evaders to come to the aid of their government. Annapolis needs the money, and it is willing to waive penalties if non-filers pay what's due, with interest. That's the carrot held out to scofflaws. What they also need to know is that those who don't take advantage of this 61-day amnesty face a doubling of potential fines and a beefed-up compliance effort by Comptroller William Donald Schaefer. State lawmakers approved the amnesty program to help balance this year's budget.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1999
A basement storage room at the Maryland Comptroller's Office is rapidly filling with hundreds of cartons of cigarettes confiscated from smugglers -- a haul worth tens of thousands of dollars on the black market.Enforcement agents have lined up more storage space. They figure they are going to need it as they target bootleggers hoping to cash in on the cigarette tax increase that took effect in Maryland July 1."I really think as time goes by this situation is going to get worse," said Larry W. Tolliver, director of the comptroller's field enforcement division.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | September 9, 1999
Anti-smoking groups in Maryland and neighboring states are asking the Federal Trade Commission to investigate whether cigarette makers have violated antitrust laws by cutting prices at stores near Maryland's border to boost cross-border cigarette sales.Tobacco companies deny any such discounting and say the anti-smoking groups created a cross-border smuggling problem by pushing for an increase in Maryland's tax.Maryland raised its cigarette tax July 1 from 36 cents to 66 cents per pack, the highest rate in the mid-Atlantic region.
NEWS
By Bill Atkinson and Kevin L. McQuaid and Bill Atkinson and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Jay Hancock contributed to this article | January 12, 1997
Dramatic shifts in Maryland's economy have made expanding its sales tax base necessary -- even crucial -- for boosting its prosperity, but businesses and middle-class people would pay the biggest price, economists and experts say.More than $1 billion a year could be added to state coffers, if a plan introduced by House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr. to increase the number of service-oriented businesses subject to state sales tax becomes law.Auto repair shops,...
NEWS
By R. ROBERT LINOWES | April 2, 1991
There is never a good time to talk about taxes. GivenMaryland's softened economy and the current state budget deficit, the prospect of new taxes is neither popular nor promising.Yet, a discussion about Maryland's tax system is very much in order. Our system is outmoded and outdated. Over time it has failed to keep pace with the changing nature of the state and the needs of all our citizens. It is not a fair system -- either in how it taxes, or in how the revenue is expended.The Commission on State Taxes and Tax Structure was created in 1987 for the express purpose of finding ways to change and improve Maryland's tax system.
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | March 16, 1997
POSTURING OVER taxes and tax cuts has dominated the 1997 General Assembly session.Yet this state's economy may not be sound enough to withstand a major income-tax cut without sharply curbing spending on schools, health care and economic development. Maryland's slow growth isn't generating sufficient new revenue to offset the loss of $300 million or more annually.What prompted this tax-reduction mania was a long-standing wail from the state Chamber of Commerce about Maryland's punishing income-tax rate.
NEWS
By Bill Atkinson and Kevin L. McQuaid and Bill Atkinson and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Jay Hancock contributed to this article | January 12, 1997
Dramatic shifts in Maryland's economy have made expanding its sales tax base necessary -- even crucial -- for boosting its prosperity, but businesses and middle-class people would pay the biggest price, economists and experts say.More than $1 billion a year could be added to state coffers, if a plan introduced by House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr. to increase the number of service-oriented businesses subject to state sales tax becomes law.Auto repair shops,...
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