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July 2, 1992
NAMES AND PLACES* Saturday is free fishing day for Maryland residents in public tidal and nontidal waters of the state. The purpose of the one-day moratorium on fishing licenses is to offer the opportunity for everyone to get out and enjoy the sport in Maryland's state parks and forests. The following state parks are holding special programs on Saturday: Deep Creek Lake, Smallwood, Pocomoke River, Tuckahoe, Assateague, Martinak, Point Lookout and Janes Island.* The Department of Natural Resources is starting a program volunteer park rangers.
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NEWS
April 10, 2009
As a historical artifact, Maryland's state song is an invaluable insight into the mindset of Maryland in 1861. We were a state awash in Southern sympathizers, and we looked none too kindly upon Abraham Lincoln and the Union Army. It's not just a few anti-Lincoln references here or there in the nine-stanza poem set to "O Tannenbaum"; the song is a rallying cry to defend against "Northern scum." Those lyrics may be offensive by modern sensibilities (it's hard not to be a little taken aback when one of the nation's greatest presidents is referred to as a despot right off the bat)
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NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau of The Sun Sun staff writers Peter Jensen and Nelson Schwartz contributed to this article | February 8, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Federal employees got the prospect of a slim pay raise, and Maryland's state and local governments got more good news than bad from President Clinton's budget yesterday.In general, the spending plan for the fiscal year that begins Oct. 1 was welcomed by Maryland's chief lobbyist in Washington, who said the state did well in a tight budget year.The Northeast-Midwest Congressional Coalition published an analysis that, while critical of the president for proposing to slash mass-transit subsidies, public-housing money and energy assistance for low-income families, showed that Maryland would receive increases in 11 of 12 federal programs it analyzed.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,Sun reporter | April 11, 2008
Maryland's State House always undergoes a drastic transformation in April, when all the adrenaline that flowed through the halls during the General Assembly session is replaced, overnight, by silence. But with the national historic landmark closed to visitors and workers until January, the mood this year is almost funerary. Moving trucks surround the centuries-old building as workers clean out their offices, exhuming a sea of paper, the detritus of frenzied lawmaking built up year after year, to be boxed up or recycled.
NEWS
By Robert O.C. Worcester | February 8, 1996
DISCUSSIONS about Maryland's high personal income tax largely ignore the causes of taxes, as though taxes exist in a vacuum. There have been two results. We fail to examine properly where we have more government than we need or can afford. And elected officials, eager to maintain current tax levels, have tried to claim the high ground with assertions that, while Maryland's state and local personal income-tax rate is fourth-highest nationally, its total tax profile -- the combination of all Maryland taxes is not burdensome: In total taxes per capita, Maryland ranks 12th.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,[Sun reporter] | November 1, 2007
For the first time in 15 years, Maryland striped bass anglers will have a spring trophy season designed and managed by state fisheries officials. By an overwhelming margin, the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission yesterday relinquished control of the state's most popular and lucrative season for 2008, thereby eliminating an annual quota that was often exceeded and allowing Maryland to regulate its season the way other Eastern Seaboard states do....
NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR | November 29, 1992
The good news is that some of the economic indicators for Maryland are finally upbeat. The bad news is that a return to financial health is likely to short-circuit steps to reorganize and shrink state government in Annapolis.That would be tragic. Only after years of economic hardship have state legislators finally gotten serious about taking a fresh look at the way government does its business.The most far-reaching recommendations of the Butta commission on efficiency in government won't be released till next month -- and then might well be ignored.
BUSINESS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,New York Bureau of The Sun | November 26, 1991
NEW YORK -- The tough economic climate is likely to put further pressure on Maryland's vaunted AAA bond rating as well as on the credit ratings of the local governments within the state, requiring further austerity, tax increases or both, according to Standard & Poor's. But there are at least tentative indications that better times may be on the horizon."My gut tells me that the worst may be behind us, but I'm surprised states continue to find budget gaps and shortfalls," said Richard Larkin, an analyst with S&P who co-authored a report on regional credit issues published yesterday.
NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR | June 9, 1991
What in the world is happening in Maryland's State House? Did they change the brand of bottled water or clean the ventilation ducts?Sanity, of all things, has suddenly descended on the state capital. Cooperation has replaced confrontation. Deep wounds are beginning to heal -- slowly. Gov. William Donald Schaefer has emerged from a dreadful seven-month funk. The bitter winter-spring hostilities have ended.House Speaker R. Clayton Mitchell last week decided to stop playing autocrat; Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller suspended his war of words with the governor, and Mr. Schaefer left on Friday for the Far East with a slight smile on his face.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,Sun reporter | April 11, 2008
Maryland's State House always undergoes a drastic transformation in April, when all the adrenaline that flowed through the halls during the General Assembly session is replaced, overnight, by silence. But with the national historic landmark closed to visitors and workers until January, the mood this year is almost funerary. Moving trucks surround the centuries-old building as workers clean out their offices, exhuming a sea of paper, the detritus of frenzied lawmaking built up year after year, to be boxed up or recycled.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,[Sun reporter] | November 1, 2007
For the first time in 15 years, Maryland striped bass anglers will have a spring trophy season designed and managed by state fisheries officials. By an overwhelming margin, the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission yesterday relinquished control of the state's most popular and lucrative season for 2008, thereby eliminating an annual quota that was often exceeded and allowing Maryland to regulate its season the way other Eastern Seaboard states do....
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2004
Edward C. Papenfuse isn't quite sure he's ready to become a major public building. He has never held elected office. And he is quite alive. But as to the building, he may not have a choice. Tomorrow the state Board of Public Works will vote on whether to name the Hall of Records in Annapolis after Papenfuse, Maryland's state archivist for almost 30 years. Such a proposal seldom gets on the board's agenda unless it's a done deal, so Papenfuse seems destined to join the likes of Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller and Comptroller William Donald Schaefer in the ranks of living Marylanders who are also edifices.
NEWS
March 15, 2004
Girl's beating will alter lives for many years It is with shock and disbelief that I write this letter regarding the vicious and cruel beating of 12-year-old Nicole Ashley Townes ("5 accused in beating of girl, 12, at party," March 11). Why anyone, adult or child, would participate in such a vile act and believe that he or she could get away with it is far beyond me. A grown woman allegedly encouraging her daughter to beat up a young girl because she kissed a boy during a game? It is impossible to fathom.
NEWS
April 30, 2001
Elkridge is no place to relcate city strip club Dan Rodricks recommended that strip club owner Kenny Jackson move his establishment to U.S. 1 in Elkridge ("Nice guys finish last -- and cost us too much," April 13). I take issue with this on behalf of the good people of Elkridge. Rather than finding citizens rolling out the welcome mat, Mr. Jackson would likely find a citizenry outraged and ready to defend their community from the element such an establishment would attract. I have been a county councilman for two-and-a-half years, and I have yet to meet a group of people more dedicated to the preservation and improvement of their community than the citizens of Elkridge.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2001
The girls from Allegany County came prepared yesterday to win the hearts and votes of the Commerce and Government Matters Committee. Of course, they had charm on their side. But the fifth-graders didn't want to rely on smiles to press their cause, naming the calico as Maryland's state cat. They had done their homework, even prepped themselves against the school debate team. They had buttons. They had brochures. They had Maggie, a calico given dispensation to be in the committee room. Like countless others who come to Annapolis to stake their claim to the political process, they were armed with facts.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | January 21, 1999
The seeds of school accountability and improvement that President Clinton attempted to plant in his State of the Union message this week are already sprouting in Maryland, recognized these days as a national leader in education reform.Threatening the loss of federal dollars, the president called for ending social promotions, helping the lowest-performing schools, issuing report cards on every school, improving teacher preparedness, reducing class size, adopting discipline policies and building and renovating schools.
NEWS
January 28, 1995
IT IS ONE of those confounding questions that requires an answer as firm as quicksand: How big is Maryland's state bureaucracy?Just the classified employees number 45,000. If you add in unclassified employees, the number is 59,000. If you count temporary employees, the total is 60,000.That's what the state personnel department uses: 60,199 exactly, as of last June 30. But this doesn't count workers at the University of Maryland and the Mass Transit Administration or contract employees.But if you add UM staffers, the total rises to 75,000.
NEWS
March 15, 2004
Girl's beating will alter lives for many years It is with shock and disbelief that I write this letter regarding the vicious and cruel beating of 12-year-old Nicole Ashley Townes ("5 accused in beating of girl, 12, at party," March 11). Why anyone, adult or child, would participate in such a vile act and believe that he or she could get away with it is far beyond me. A grown woman allegedly encouraging her daughter to beat up a young girl because she kissed a boy during a game? It is impossible to fathom.
NEWS
October 26, 1997
RAISING private funds for their public university is relatively new for Marylanders. Unlike many other states, especially in the Midwest, Maryland's state university didn't get seriously into fund-raising until 12 years ago. While donations have risen dramatically from $16 million to $112 million in that time, it will take much more to create a great higher-education system.Thus, the University of Maryland's $700 million campaign was born. Quietly, the first $225 million has been raised, mainly from foundations.
NEWS
June 16, 1996
VISITING THE Maryland State House is like taking a walk through history. As you enter the nation's oldest state capitol in continuous use, you're walking on marble floors once trod by Thomas Jefferson and other members of the Continental Congress. The old Senate chamber looks the same as it did when Gen. George Washington resigned as this country's commander in chief. Tiffany glass ceilings sparkle in the "new" (finished in 1905) House and Senate chambers.The 200-foot-tall wooden dome, still with much of the original building material, towers over Annapolis.
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