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NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,Staff Writer | June 22, 1993
Gov. William Donald Schaefer's efforts in funding programs to feed Maryland's hungry earned him a C, which is just slightly better than the C-minus the General Assembly earned, according to this year's report card from the Maryland Food Committee.The grading ranges from A for excellent to F for failing. The committee determined the grades by assessing how much of the state's fiscal year 1994 operating budget is dedicated to alleviating hunger across the state.The governor and the legislators received an A and a B, respectively, for their efforts to feed mothers and infants, B's for feeding senior citizens, and D's for feeding schoolchildren.
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NEWS
December 5, 2008
Towson woman critical after being hit by car A Towson woman was reported in critical condition at Maryland Shock Trauma Center yesterday after she was struck by a car in front of her home, county police said. The woman was hit while adjusting the driver's side mirror of her car, which had been struck by another vehicle earlier and whose driver failed to stop, according to police. Officer Keith Weber said Terwanda Owens, 19, of the 8600 block of Oakleigh Road was standing in the roadway in front of her home next to her Chevrolet Malibu at about 5:10 p.m. when she was struck by a 1999 Mitsubishi Galant driven by a woman who stopped and whose name was not released.
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NEWS
September 25, 1990
Next weekend, hundreds will gather outside the Maryland Science Center for a candlelight vigil supporting the World Summit for Children, a gathering of more than 70 heads of state aimed at meeting the health, education and emotional needs of youngsters around the globe.That Baltimore's vigil is being held at the Inner Harbor, birthplace of this city's renaissance, is richly symbolic of how far we've come and how far we have yet to go in developing the state's most important resource -- its children.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,stephanie.desmon@baltsun.com | October 25, 2008
Maryland has made great strides in reducing lead paint poisoning among children and in improving the outdoor air they breathe, but more needs to be done to keep track of other environmental hazards and their links to kids' health, according to a report released yesterday by state health and environment officials. While pointing to previously reported decreases in the number of children with lead poisoning and an equally significant drop in ozone levels in Maryland, officials said they plan to better keep track of issues such as pesticide levels in children, their exposure to pharmaceuticals in water and where serious asthma cases are most concentrated.
NEWS
February 12, 1991
As the "Year of the Infant" draws to a close, we are left with the distinct sense that in the end, this worthy initiative never bridged the gap between marketing and delivery. Thirteen months ago, an impassioned Gov. William Donald Schaefer proclaimed, "Our children are our future," as he ticked off a raft of programs aimed at improving the status of youngsters in the current fiscal year.Many of these programs have been stalled or derailed by budget cuts and lack of funds. Worse, the effort has not only failed to move forward but actually has lost ground in key areas such as infant mortality and the percentage of low birth-weight babies.
NEWS
September 10, 2002
Hiring freeze worsens woes of child welfare The Sun recently reported on a legislative audit of Maryland's foster care system that identifies lapses in documentation that may indicate neglectful care of children in state custody ("Audit finds lapses in Maryland's foster care," Aug. 23). While the article identified social workers' caseload size as a serious obstacle to ensuring that children in our state's custody receive the quality care they deserve, it is troubling that the article did not mention the state hiring freeze that has been in place since last October.
NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM | February 6, 1994
Information is power, if you know how to use it.This week, advocates for children welcomed the publication of Maryland's first ''Kids Count'' fact book. There in cold, hard numbers are the facts about children in Maryland, facts that provide ammunition for the public policy debate.County by county, the book provides telling details that add life to the larger picture, a picture that mixes good news and bad. Infant mortality -- a key indicator of any society's standard of living -- has declined to its lowest level ever in Maryland.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | April 7, 1999
A survey that examines the conditions for Maryland's children has found improvements, including a lower childhood death rate, increased child-support collections and a lower rate of credible reports of child abuse -- but a dispiriting rise in the number of school suspensions for violent behavior.The Maryland "Kids Count" Fact Book, funded by the Annie E. Casey Foundation of Baltimore, found improvement in seven of 16 "indicators" used to measure overall conditions for young people. Those indicators range from infant mortality to poverty data.
NEWS
July 3, 1994
Teachers complain, and rightly so, that they get no respect, even for a job well done. But restoring respect goes hand in hand with establishing accountability and public perceptions of competence.Recent actions by the State Board of Education will make a big difference. In Maryland, as in many states, experienced teachers have virtually a lifetime license to teach, once they reach tenure. Renewing a state certificate is a routine matter, requiring a $10 fee every 10 years. Refusing a license renewal because of poor performance in the classroom is almost unheard of.The new regulations require a satisfactory evaluation at least three years out of five, as well as a professional development plan demonstrating a teacher's intentions to keep up-to-date in the profession.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2000
Maryland's child poverty rate dropped dramatically in 1998, giving the state the lowest rate in the nation, according to U.S. Census estimates. Maryland Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend will announce that figure today as she unveils the first state report to measure conditions for Maryland's children -- a report with statistics that will be used to determine which counties are using effective strategies to improve education, lower crime and combat teen-age...
NEWS
September 7, 2008
Child welfare decisions aren't based on race The Maryland Department of Human Resources does not use and does not condone using race as a determining factor in deciding a proper course for abused or neglected children ("Keeping families whole," editorial, Sept. 2). We never have and we never will. The issue of disproportionate representation of children of color in the child welfare system is not unique to Maryland. Like many other states, Maryland is looking at practices to address this issue.
NEWS
May 8, 2008
DHR is working to be transparent Nothing matters more to me as secretary of the Department of Human Resources than providing the best possible outcomes for Maryland's children and families. Every decision I make is aimed at achieving that goal. Since becoming secretary, I have engaged public and private entities, legislators, advocates, Maryland's judiciary, law enforcement, health departments and the media in my action plan for improving child welfare in Maryland. That includes operating in a transparent, inclusive manner that brings more people into the tent than ever before.
NEWS
By Julie Turkewitz and Julie Turkewitz,Sun reporter | July 26, 2007
Maryland is one of the nation's wealthiest states, yet its infant mortality rate increased 11 percent between 2000 to 2004 and ranked as the nation's ninth worst, according to the 2007 Kids Count Databook, a report released yesterday by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. "Maryland's current rate of 8.4 infant deaths per 1,000 live births is nearly 23 percent higher than the national rate," says the report, also noting that the number of low birth-weight babies increased by 8 percent and was more than 15 percent higher than the national rate.
NEWS
December 17, 2005
Focus on teaching basic writing skills Hear, hear to state Sen. Nathaniel J. McFadden for his angry outburst at the city school system for adopting the Studio Course reading curriculum, and for threatening to make everyone diagram sentences ("School course set for review," Dec. 10). It's about time someone got angry about how students write. In the last five years, with the proliferation of e-mail, students' ability to write has gone to the dogs. I teach college, and I'm telling you that students' writing is just downright lousy (and I don't just mean undergraduates either)
NEWS
February 26, 2000
Yes: It's only fair Basic, secular education support for all Maryland's children should be so fundamental to the public good as to be beyond debate. Public, taxpayer-funded education aid to all children in fully accredited schools of any variety is only good. Good for the children and good for our society. Most states provide some aid to all schoolchildren, and the Supreme Court has ruled that the practice is constitutionally sound. As an administrator for schools in poor neighborhoods as well as those in more fortunate surroundings, I see children whose families struggle and children in designer clothes.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2000
Maryland's child poverty rate dropped dramatically in 1998, giving the state the lowest rate in the nation, according to U.S. Census estimates. Maryland Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend will announce that figure today as she unveils the first state report to measure conditions for Maryland's children -- a report with statistics that will be used to determine which counties are using effective strategies to improve education, lower crime and combat teen-age...
NEWS
September 7, 2008
Child welfare decisions aren't based on race The Maryland Department of Human Resources does not use and does not condone using race as a determining factor in deciding a proper course for abused or neglected children ("Keeping families whole," editorial, Sept. 2). We never have and we never will. The issue of disproportionate representation of children of color in the child welfare system is not unique to Maryland. Like many other states, Maryland is looking at practices to address this issue.
NEWS
April 8, 1999
CONSIDERING ITS relative wealth, Maryland continues to do a lousy job of raising its children. Other states have more children living in poverty, yet Maryland fares worse in key areas of child welfare.It would be easier to celebrate the good news -- better prenatal care, lower infant mortality and fewer teens dying violently -- if Maryland did not have such a long way to go. In the Annie E. Casey Foundation's latest "Kids Count" survey last year, Maryland ranked 32nd in child welfare, although three-fifths of the states had a higher percentage of children living in poverty.
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