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By Michael Dresser and David Conn and Michael Dresser and David Conn,Sun Staff Writers | April 21, 1995
"We have kept our promises," Gov. Parris N. Glendening told a gathering of Maryland's business leaders yesterday.By and large, his audience agreed. And where they didn't, they at least gave him credit for trying.The governor received a warm but not wild reception at a breakfast forum marking the symbolic end of his first 100 days in office on the actual 93rd day. And if there was any yearning for a different result in last year's election squeaker, the leaders gathered at the Convention Center kept it politely suppressed as they heard a resolutely pro-business message from a governor many of them did not vote for.When Mr. Glendening boasted that he had just completed the "most pro-business legislative session in two decades," there were no groans, catcalls or arguments.
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BUSINESS
By JAMIE SMITH HOPKINS and JAMIE SMITH HOPKINS,SUN REPORTER | January 26, 2006
Three out of every four companies in Maryland expect to add jobs this year, buoyed by revenue growth and their perception of a favorable business climate, according to a University of Baltimore survey released yesterday. The study, primarily funded by state agencies, polled 250 businesses in the final three months of last year. It is conducted quarterly, though the university said it is unclear if it will continue because coordinators have yet to find enough sponsors to cover this year's $63,000 tab. Businesses' expectations for 2006 are high: 73 percent predicted employment growth and 77 percent anticipated revenue growth, the survey found.
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BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | May 3, 1998
Three years ago, Maryland's economy was listless. Gung-ho businessman James T. Brady was the new economic development secretary. And Gov. Parris N. Glendening was saying, "We need to send a message that says: You need to do business here."Now the economy is humming but not booming. Brady resigned last week, partly over differences with the governor. And Glendening is saying that "business interests must be balanced with education, health, public safety and other priorities."The iron no longer seems hot for business-driven policy changes in Maryland.
NEWS
May 18, 2003
Raising taxes on businesses blocks recovery The business tax bill passed by the Maryland General Assembly would have a negative impact on Maryland's business climate and competitive posture. The Maryland Chamber of Commerce has urged Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. to veto the bill and make the cuts necessary to bring state spending in line with the state's capacity to support its expenditures. If the state is going to rise out of the current economic slump, we must encourage business development and job creation.
NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR | April 4, 1999
MARYLAND's business climate has been a hotly contested issue for decades. Is the environment so hostile to companies that it chases away jobs?Judging from what's happening in the State House this year, critics have a good case. Corporate leaders are finding it increasingly difficult to argue that Maryland is trying to help -- rather than hurt -- the business community.Sure, there are isolated instances where the state goes all-out. Take Marriott International. When the Bethesda-based hotelier started scouting Virginia for possible headquarters sites, a lucrative aid package was assembled -- with legislative support -- to keep Marriott in Maryland.
NEWS
September 4, 1998
Maryland's next governor will face issues that include improving education and the state's business climate and finding ways to bolster horse racing. The Sun sent questionnaires to the gubernatorial candidates concerning these and other issues. In preparation for the Sept. 15 primary election, here are edited excerpts from their responsesCharles I. EckerRepublicanEDUCATION: A back-to-basics approach is needed. For example, use phonics to teach reading. Expect students to learn and to behave.
BUSINESS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Sun Staff Writer | January 5, 1995
Sports teams and symphonies may make life more pleasant for Maryland's executives, but safe streets and good schools are much more important to the state's business climate, a Baltimore executive told state legislators yesterday.Maryland has long seemed to be in "confusion over the relative importance of various kinds of amenities," said A. B. "Buzzy" Krongard, chief executive officer of Alex. Brown & Sons Inc.Recreation and the arts "are all important, but they pale in comparison with tax rates, quality education and public safety" as factors in business location decisions, he said.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1998
Reacting to a survey that found decreased optimism about Maryland's business climate, the state's acting economic development secretary said yesterday that the climate "is better but not as good as it could be."James D. Fielder Jr., who took over as head of the Department of Business and Economic Development after James T. Brady resigned April 28, pointed to an income tax cut, smoother permit procedures and the appointment of a state trouble-shooter as examples of the state's increased friendliness toward business.
NEWS
May 18, 2003
Raising taxes on businesses blocks recovery The business tax bill passed by the Maryland General Assembly would have a negative impact on Maryland's business climate and competitive posture. The Maryland Chamber of Commerce has urged Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. to veto the bill and make the cuts necessary to bring state spending in line with the state's capacity to support its expenditures. If the state is going to rise out of the current economic slump, we must encourage business development and job creation.
NEWS
June 30, 1991
It has been a long and frustrating journey for backers of a golf course and conference center at Rocky Gap State Park designed to boost the economy of Western Maryland. After seven years of controversy in Annapolis and years of searching for developers, backers are within $2 million of their goal. But that last piece of the puzzle is proving elusive. Unless financial angels step forth by Sept. 1, the $48 million project will unravel.Members of the state's business community should not let that happen.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2003
Aris Melissaratos' corner office on the 23rd floor of Redwood Towers downtown was bare and lonely. No artwork or diplomas on the walls. No pictures of grandchildren on the desk. Not even stacks of paper in the "to do" box. "This is my 36th hour on the job," said Melissaratos, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s newly appointed head of the Department of Business and Economic Development. Melissaratos is not worried about trappings, there are bigger issues commanding his time: helping form a vision that will guide the state's economy for the next four years.
NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR | April 4, 1999
MARYLAND's business climate has been a hotly contested issue for decades. Is the environment so hostile to companies that it chases away jobs?Judging from what's happening in the State House this year, critics have a good case. Corporate leaders are finding it increasingly difficult to argue that Maryland is trying to help -- rather than hurt -- the business community.Sure, there are isolated instances where the state goes all-out. Take Marriott International. When the Bethesda-based hotelier started scouting Virginia for possible headquarters sites, a lucrative aid package was assembled -- with legislative support -- to keep Marriott in Maryland.
NEWS
September 4, 1998
Maryland's next governor will face issues that include improving education and the state's business climate and finding ways to bolster horse racing. The Sun sent questionnaires to the gubernatorial candidates concerning these and other issues. In preparation for the Sept. 15 primary election, here are edited excerpts from their responsesCharles I. EckerRepublicanEDUCATION: A back-to-basics approach is needed. For example, use phonics to teach reading. Expect students to learn and to behave.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1998
Reacting to a survey that found decreased optimism about Maryland's business climate, the state's acting economic development secretary said yesterday that the climate "is better but not as good as it could be."James D. Fielder Jr., who took over as head of the Department of Business and Economic Development after James T. Brady resigned April 28, pointed to an income tax cut, smoother permit procedures and the appointment of a state trouble-shooter as examples of the state's increased friendliness toward business.
NEWS
May 24, 1998
Reading by 9The Sun is seeking letters from elementary schoolchildren about their favorite books and reading experiences. Selected letters will be edited and published in the editorial pages.Letters should be no longer than 200 words and should include the name and address of the writer, along with day and evening telephone numbers.Send letters to Letters to the Editor, The Sun, P.O. Box 1377, Baltimore 21278-0001. Our fax number for letters is 410-332-6977. The e-mail address is letteraltsun.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | May 3, 1998
Three years ago, Maryland's economy was listless. Gung-ho businessman James T. Brady was the new economic development secretary. And Gov. Parris N. Glendening was saying, "We need to send a message that says: You need to do business here."Now the economy is humming but not booming. Brady resigned last week, partly over differences with the governor. And Glendening is saying that "business interests must be balanced with education, health, public safety and other priorities."The iron no longer seems hot for business-driven policy changes in Maryland.
NEWS
May 24, 1998
Reading by 9The Sun is seeking letters from elementary schoolchildren about their favorite books and reading experiences. Selected letters will be edited and published in the editorial pages.Letters should be no longer than 200 words and should include the name and address of the writer, along with day and evening telephone numbers.Send letters to Letters to the Editor, The Sun, P.O. Box 1377, Baltimore 21278-0001. Our fax number for letters is 410-332-6977. The e-mail address is letteraltsun.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | November 18, 1993
Havre de Grace. -- We've heard a lot lately about Mexico's business climate. What about Maryland's?Ask that question to top executives at many major companies, including firms already here and those which have recently decided to leave or stay away, and they will emphatically tell you it stinks.As that's a politically explosive assertion, most of them won't say it publicly. Their timidity is unfortunate. If they would speak up for themselves instead of keeping quiet or hiding behind surrogates, they would help push this important debate front and center, where it belongs.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | January 18, 1998
Business executives sometimes argue about when Maryland hit bottom as business-hostile territory.Was it in the early 1980s, when interest-rate regulation forced credit card issuers into Delaware and caused Maryland to miss tens of thousands of new jobs and hundreds of millions in investment? Was it 1992, when Maryland landed a Frito-Lay factory in Harford County and then proceeded to levy a snack tax on the company's products?Was it all those times that Maryland overachieved in Money magazine's annual list of "tax hells"?
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | June 3, 1996
William E. Mayer, who overhauled the University of Maryland's business school and enhanced its reputation, is carrying through with his promise to cap his tenure as the school's dean at five years.In a letter to the school's faculty, Mayer, the former investment bank executive who became dean in 1992, will resign either when his successor is appointed, or by June 30, 1997 -- whichever comes first."I write this letter with pride," he told colleagues, praising the faculty, staff, students and alumni for revamping the academic program.
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