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By Steven Stanek and Steven Stanek,Sun Reporter | July 20, 2008
Two years ago, Germaine Thomas and her husband, Anthony, moved with their five children into a house in an upscale neighborhood in Prince George's County. Their purchase price was $810,000, but now houses in the area are selling for about half that. "In the course of about two years, we've watched our block disappear. ... Basically half the block is gone, and as a result, home prices are plummeting," said Germaine Thomas, adding that they are now unable to pay back their loans and are facing foreclosure.
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NEWS
May 9, 2014
"If all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail. " That little nugget of truth, also known as the "law of the instrument," can be applied to more than just tool selection. When it comes to some closely-held beliefs, people tend to see circumstances as frequently proving them correct - even when they do nothing of the kind. At least that might explain why a recently-released Gallup poll finding that 47 percent of Maryland residents would choose to move if they could - the third highest percentage among the states - is being cited by many as evidence of failed tax policy.
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TRAVEL
By Clarissa Higgins and Clarissa Higgins,The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2009
Maryland residents save at Lorien Hotel and Spa What's the deal?: Maryland residents will receive a discount on their stay when they visit Kimpton's Lorien Hotel and Spa in Alexandria, Va. The new boutique hotel is in the heart of Old Town Alexandria on King Street. What's the savings?: Receive 20 percent off by presenting your driver's license. After taxes, a room that totaled $492.60 was $392.25 with discount. What's the catch?: You must be a Maryland resident and stay a minimum of two nights to receive the deal.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
When 89-year-old Waunita Ohler had to make three calls this winter to her propane supplier for emergency deliveries to avoid running out, the Elkridge mobile home park resident knew there was a problem. What she didn't realize was its scale: A national shortage caused by what some call a "perfect storm" of factors has affected millions and sent prices soaring by more than two-thirds. "Deliveries have been late in the past, but never have I run out of gas this way," said Ohler, who has used propane for cooking and to heat her home for 28 years.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | September 2, 1992
Residents of other states and the District of Columbia poured into Maryland during the 1980s, swelling the state's population by more than 101,000 through migration alone, the Maryland Office of Planning has reported.The big gainers -- especially during the boom years of the late 1980s -- were the state's wealthiest counties, Montgomery and Howard.The big losers, continuing a 1970s trend, were Baltimore City and Prince George's County. Between them, they lost more than 117,000 residents to migration.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,Sun Staff Writer | May 26, 1994
People accused of being members of a drug ring that has imported more than $150 million in marijuana to the mid-Atlantic region since the late 1970s were named yesterday in an indictment unsealed by federal prosecutors.Assistant U.S. Attorney James Alsup described it as the largest marijuana case ever prosecuted in the district."If you'd told me an operation of this size was operating in this region and was able to unload the amounts they were able to unload, I wouldn't have believed it," he said, describing an operation that mainly used sailboats to bring in marijuana from South America, Mexico, Jamaica and Thailand.
NEWS
February 2, 2012
Perhaps our current governor could also have a regular column in The Sun - he could call it "Our Daily Tax. " I wonder how many "high earners" will wise up and become "former Maryland residents?" Rhonda Jackson, Hunt Valley
NEWS
June 28, 2011
Taxes, taxes, and more taxes for the Maryland residents to pay is the only solution The Sun seems to endorse. Now The Sun is attacking Internet purchasing ("The digital divide," June 26) because on-line retailers do not charge sales taxes to customers unless there is a retail outlet in the state where the buyer is located. Earth to spaceship Sun: Maryland residents (liberals and conservatives) love not paying sales taxes for Internet purchases. If you think the current public backlash against giving illegal aliens a tuition break is big news, just wait to see what happens should the sales tax-free status of Internet purchasing be eliminated.
NEWS
July 24, 1996
A table accompanying a story about HMOs in Sunday's business section showed profits and losses on Maryland residents, based on reports to the Maryland Insurance Administration. Anthony Davis, a spokesman for the Prudential HMO, said that the figures in its quarterly report showing a loss were for its national operation, and that the HMO is profitable in Maryland. He said Prudential does not make public Maryland figures quarterly but does so annually.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 7/25/96
NEWS
December 27, 2009
Your recent editorial "It's Miller Time?" (Dec. 18) severely misrepresented the impact that raising the tax on beverage alcohol will have on the state of Maryland and its hospitality industry. As a Maryland resident and employee of Diageo, which employs more than 300 Maryland residents at our local bottling plant in Relay, I'm concerned that you are downplaying the potential damage of this tax. It's the hardworking citizens - like those who work on our bottling line - who will bear the brunt of this tax. Raising taxes on consumer products always means job losses.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2012
State and local officials have returned to the Eastern Shore communities ravaged by superstorm Sandy's heavy rains and high winds to comb over the damage in hopes of appealing federal officials' decision to deny aid to Maryland. The Federal Emergency Management Agency declined the state's request for funds for individual residents because the damage was not considered substantial enough. But U.S. Sens. Barbara A. Mikulski and Ben Cardin, Gov. Martin O'Malley's administration and other state leaders vowed this week to appeal the decision, citing extensive damage to the area, where more than 300 homes are estimated to have been severely damaged.
NEWS
By John Fritze and Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2012
The Obama administration has denied Maryland's request for federal aid for hundreds of Eastern Shore residents affected by superstorm Sandy, prompting an outcry from state officials, who vowed to appeal the decision. Though the federal government issued a disaster declaration for Maryland and is helping cover costs for repairing public property, Federal Emergency Management Agency officials said the storm did not cause enough damage to justify assistance to individuals who lost homes or businesses.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2012
As the state fair opens in Timonium, pigs that will be judged for prizes will also be under scrutiny from state veterinarians after an outbreak of swine flu nearly threatened to shut down the event. The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said a new strain of swine flu has been detected in 12 people who were exposed to pigs this month at the Queen Anne's County Fair. Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released Friday showed 276 cases nationwide.
NEWS
February 2, 2012
Perhaps our current governor could also have a regular column in The Sun - he could call it "Our Daily Tax. " I wonder how many "high earners" will wise up and become "former Maryland residents?" Rhonda Jackson, Hunt Valley
EXPLORE
June 29, 2011
A new study well worth reading by every elected official in Maryland is entitled "Freedom in the 50 States. " You can find this study on the web at http://mercatus.org/freedom-50-states-2011. It ranks Maryland as 43rd out of the 50 states, meaning that Maryland is one of the least free states in the country. This study is very insightful and addresses both economic freedom (taxation) as well as unnecessary restrictions on personal liberties. A prime example of the type of bad legislation that deprives Maryland residents of their freedoms is the recently enacted HB 88, which makes the shipment of cigars and pipe tobacco into Maryland illegal.
NEWS
June 28, 2011
Taxes, taxes, and more taxes for the Maryland residents to pay is the only solution The Sun seems to endorse. Now The Sun is attacking Internet purchasing ("The digital divide," June 26) because on-line retailers do not charge sales taxes to customers unless there is a retail outlet in the state where the buyer is located. Earth to spaceship Sun: Maryland residents (liberals and conservatives) love not paying sales taxes for Internet purchases. If you think the current public backlash against giving illegal aliens a tuition break is big news, just wait to see what happens should the sales tax-free status of Internet purchasing be eliminated.
NEWS
October 22, 2002
Only 69.2 percent of Maryland residents who are eligible to vote are registered. This is the seventh-lowest in the nation among the 48 states that require voters to register before election day. The national average is 76 percent. Percent of eligible State ........................voters registered..................Rank Arizona..............................59.9................................48 Wyoming............................61.5................................47 California.....
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1997
Hundreds of Maryland residents targeted to lose their disability and medical assistance payments have won a temporary reprieve in federal court in Baltimore, where lawyers for the poor and the government have settled a class action lawsuit.The settlement, reached late last week, requires the Social Security Administration to re-examine the cases of 842 Maryland residents that were scheduled to lose their benefits under a tough new federal law passed by Congress last year.The settlement is not expected to have an impact on cases pending outside the state.
NEWS
June 4, 2011
The pro-Dream Act crowd, as indicated by recent letters printed in The Sun, frequently describes the in-state tuition debate in terms of fairness. Yet the reason that the pro-illegal immigrant crowd continues to see their Dream Act slipping away is due in no small measure to the fact that they really can't answer the fundamental fairness questions the legislation presents. For starters, it's certainly not fair to those immigrants who have been waiting to enter the country legally for Maryland to give any special treatment to those who jumped to the head of the line illegally.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2011
Eight times a week, Alan Mingo Jr. can't wait to make an ass of himself. The actor and singer, who spent his high school and college years in Maryland, landed the plum role of the wisecracking, hyperactive donkey in the national tour of "Shrek The Musical. " The show about a grumpy green ogre and the feisty princess he sets out to rescue arrives at the France-Merrick Performing Arts Center for two weeks starting Tuesday. After graduating from Magruder High School in Rockville, Mingo received a free ride to the University of Maryland, College Park in the 1990s.
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