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by Matthew Hay Brown and The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2013
Rep. Paul Ryan, the Republican vice presidential nominee in 2012, is scheduled to speak in Baltimore on Thursday at the Maryland Republican Party's annual Red, White and Blue Dinner. Ryan, who chairs the House Budget Committee, is seen as a leading candidate for the GOP presidential nomination in 2016. The Red, White and Blue Dinner is the state party's largest fundraiser of the year. Previous speakers include Ryan's 2012 running mate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney; House Speaker Newt Gingrich and Republican strategist Karl Rove.
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Tim Wheeler | September 9, 2014
Legislators from Maryland and Pennsylvania sparred at a hearing in Annapolis Monday over whether their states are doing too much or too little to reduce Chesapeake Bay pollution. In a U.S. Senate subcommittee hearing called to review the new bay restoration agreement, Maryland state Sen. Steve Hershey complained about the "astronomical cost" of cleaning up the ailing estuary, calling it an "unfunded mandate" from the federal government. Maryland's share has been estimated at nearly $15 billion through 2025, he noted.
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NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | November 3, 2010
Republican former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. described his gubernatorial election loss this week as the close of a chapter in his life. It could also signal the end of an era for the Maryland GOP. As Republicans nationwide celebrated a historic victory in the midterm elections, GOP leaders in Maryland expressed worry that Ehrlich's loss Tuesday to Democratic Gov. Martin O'Malley by twice the margin of his 2006 defeat would cement the party's minority...
NEWS
By Richard J. Cross, III | April 24, 2014
In backing Del. Steve Schuh this month over incumbent Laura Neuman in the GOP primary for Anne Arundel County Executive, former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. cited Mr. Schuh's attendance at national Republican conventions, his membership in a local Republican club, and his past volunteer activities as reasons to support him. He also faulted Ms. Neuman for having no involvement in intramural GOP politics. Curiously, Mr. Ehrlich's message did not mention the two candidates' actual records in office.
NEWS
July 22, 2013
Three years ago, Republicans running for statewide office got trounced, with their top candidate, former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., winning less than 42 percent in his rematch with Gov. Martin O'Malley. Nobody else got more than 39 percent, and the GOP didn't even bother to offer a candidate to run against the incumbent attorney general. But that was par for the course. Other than Mr. Ehrlich's victory in 2002 and one or two other aberrations, Maryland Republicans running for statewide office in recent elections have usually gotten just enough votes to lose by a landslide.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Staff Writer | March 25, 1995
Maryland Republicans were quick to use Wednesday's tax-cut vote in the House of Delegates against five Eastern Baltimore County Democratic delegates.But then, that may have been the point of the vote.Gov. Parris N. Glendening, House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr. and Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr. had agreed to postpone any consideration of a tax cut until they determine how budget cuts proposed by the Republican-controlled Congress might affect Maryland. But Republicans, who ran under gubernatorial candidate Ellen R. Sauerbrey's tax-cutting banner last year, forced a vote, vowing revenge against Democrats who opposed them.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,david.nitkin@baltsun.com | September 7, 2008
St. Paul, MINN. - Head home, hunker down and hope for the best. That was the recipe for Maryland Republicans as they departed their party's national convention to prepare for an election they hope puts John McCain in the White House. There's not much of a chance of McCain's taking Maryland, which last went for a Republican in 1988 and has drifted leftward ever since.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | August 7, 2001
WITH REP. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. still on the fence about running for governor, dozens of Maryland Republicans are lining up behind Prince George's County Councilwoman Audrey E. Scott as their alternate choice in next year's election. Scott, the lone Republican on the Prince George's council, released a list last week of about 100 people who had agreed to serve on her exploratory committee, chaired by former Sen. Charles McC. Mathias. In an interview, Scott indicated that she had little to explore.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and David Nitkin and Tim Craig and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2003
MARYLAND Republicans are trying to woo a successful Montgomery County businessman into the uphill fight next year to unseat the state's junior U.S. senator, Democrat Barbara A. Mikulski. Joshua B. Rales, a Potomac attorney and real estate developer, says he will decide within two months whether to challenge the three-term incumbent from Baltimore. GOP insiders say Rales would be an attractive candidate because he comes from the state's most populous county and, because he is Jewish, could potentially lure votes from a traditionally Democratic constituency.
TOPIC
By Herbert C. Smith and Herbert C. Smith,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 6, 2002
BACK IN the 1960s, California psychiatrist Eric Berne compiled a collection of games played by people who needed to grow up. His book, Games People Play, was a best seller and remains relevant today. One game in particular should provide some guidance to Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley in the coming months. Berne called it "Let's You and Him Fight." The variant that's urged on O'Malley these days would more accurately be labeled "Let's You and Her Fight." It's the notion that O'Malley should contest the Democratic gubernatorial nomination with Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, Maryland's lieutenant governor since 1994.
NEWS
February 20, 2014
A consensus is emerging among Maryland Republicans that a top priority for the state's economic development is to reduce the state's income tax rates or even to eliminate the tax entirely. They argue that Maryland's taxes have gone up far too much during the administration of Gov. Martin O'Malley and that the income tax in particular is driving people, businesses and jobs to other states. Unspoken in this line of reasoning is that the individual income tax is the most progressive levy we have and that eliminating it would disproportionately benefit the wealthy while diminishing the availability of services that the public broadly depends on. Republicans in the House of Delegates are backing a plan that would cut income tax rates by 10 percent over three years, and this week, Harford County Executive David Craig, a Republican candidate for governor, pitched a proposal to drop the top rate to 4.25 percent and increase the personal exemption from $3,200 to $5,000, as the first phase in an eventual elimination of the tax. (Republican gubernatorial candidate Charles Lollar has also called for the elimination of the income tax, but he has not yet provided the details.)
NEWS
By Gregory Kline | January 23, 2014
With less than 10 months before Marylanders elect a new governor, the race to succeed Martin O'Malley is more wide open then ever. Candidates in both major parties are still contemplating whether to join the race as the Feb. 25th filing deadline nears. Just this week, Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger announced he would not run for the state's highest post, while Rep. John Delaney appears to be still contemplating a run. While the state's Democratic machine long ago lined up behind Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown - who has received several key endorsements, has a high-profile running mate and has raised millions - strong challengers have still arisen from within the party.
NEWS
By Brian Griffiths | January 21, 2014
It's been nearly a year since Alex Mooney turned his back on the Maryland Republican Party, quit as chairman, turned tail, and fled to West Virginia in dogged pursuit of the Congressional seat he has always coveted. But Mooney continues to do damage to Republican candidates and conservatism on Maryland. As noted by The Quinton Report , a number of Republican elected officials in Maryland are transferring money from their state campaign accounts to Alex Mooney's congressional campaign account in West Virginia.
NEWS
January 12, 2014
A political campaign is a contact sport that is waged on the financial as well as the psychological level. Much like any poker tournament, from the random house game to the World Series, winners and losers are decided on a variety of criteria including skill, strategy, the best hand and sometimes pure luck. With the backdrop of a poker table in mind, here is how I see the current main players among the Republicans seeking to be Maryland's next governor: Jay Bala (the new guy)
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2013
Barton S. Mitchell, a retired asphalt paving company executive who was active in Maryland Republican politics and enjoyed collecting vintage cars, died Sunday of lung cancer at his Lutherville home. He was 73. "Bart was just a larger-than-life character who sucked all the air out of the room and loved playing the part of the 'Big Cheeeze,' which those who knew him called him. Everything with Bart was big, big, and I will miss him," said former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., a longtime friend.
NEWS
By Richard J. Cross III | September 2, 2013
So, do Republicans have any chance of winning the governor's mansion back next year? Let's look at the circumstances in place when the last two GOP governors (Spiro Agnew and Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.) won, and when Ellen Sauerbrey came within 6,000 votes of an upset win. • An open seat . For Maryland Republicans, opportunity only knocks once every eight years - if it knocks at all. And history has demonstrated that those opportunities are confined to years like 2014, when no incumbent is running.
NEWS
July 2, 2013
Maryland appears to be getting through the first week of July with no signs of Armageddon. Motorists are commuting in numbers typical for this time of year. A lot of their kids are staying home from school, but this is likely due to something called "summer vacation. " All in all, it's business as usual, albeit a bit rainy. That reality is quite a contrast to the gloom and doom offered by the Republican leaders who gathered on Kent Island on Monday to protest what they termed a "downpour" of tax and fee increases under Gov. Martin O'Malley.
NEWS
BY A SUN REPORTER | May 27, 2006
WASHINGTON -- President Bush is expected to raise more than $1 million for Maryland Republicans at a reception in Baltimore on Wednesday, party officials said yesterday. Bush, who is adding campaign events to his schedule as Republicans brace for tough contests in November, is expected to draw about 350 people to the Baltimore event, said John Kane, the state party chairman. White House and party officials declined to release information about the location of the reception. "We're glad to have the president come," Kane said.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2013
The director of the Maryland Republican Party resigned without notice. One of its state delegates was arrested for the second time on a serious alcohol-related charge. And a virtual civil war broke out over who should replace a leading senator who's moving to Texas. And that's just the past week's news for the state's embattled minority party. Over the last year, Maryland Republicans have lost one of their two seats in Congress, absorbed defeats in several statewide referendums and watched as their previous party chairman resigned and decamped to West Virginia.
NEWS
By Don Murphy | July 30, 2013
As the Maryland Republican Party considers reforming its nominating process to include unaffiliated voters, it seems there are as many opinions on the matter as there are Republicans. Opponents of change have the rhetoric, but advocates have the facts on their side. Republicans have not re-elected a governor in Maryland in over 50 years and have not controlled the legislature in anyone's lifetime. Maintaining the status quo and waiting for the Democrats to lose is not a winning strategy.
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