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Maryland Renaissance

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NEWS
By LYN BACKE | August 22, 1994
The Maryland Renaissance Festival returns to its sylvan setting in Crownsville Saturday, set to dazzle, delight, challenge, and entertain on Saturdays, Sundays, and Labor Day through Oct. 16. Elizabethan music, crafts, imagery and history are there for the sharing, off I-97 between routes 450 and 178.Admission to the Renaissance Festival is $11.95 for adults under 62, and $9.25 for those over. Children 7 to 15 are $4.95, and those under 7 are free.Information: 266-7304, or (800) 296-7304.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
As the Maryland Renaissance Festival prepares to open for its 2014 season on Saturday in Crownsville, hearings are looming on the festival's proposal for a future move to Lothian. The festival is seeking zoning approval to move to a farm in Lothian. Anne Arundel County's administrative hearing officer denied the festival the zoning approvals it needed. The festival appealed to the county's Board of Appeals, which has scheduled six nights of hearings for the case. The first hearing will be held from 5:30 p.m. until 7:30 p.m. on Sept.
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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | August 25, 2002
Fred Nelson was sweating. He had 15 minutes to catch his breath, change into royal garb and prepare to make the biggest entrance of his life: as King Henry VIII at the annual Maryland Renaissance Festival, which opened yesterday in Crownsville. "The only thing that has me nervous is my shoulder," he said. "It's twitching, and I have a sword fight later. " The festival, which started 25 years ago in Columbia and moved to Crownsville as it grew, is one of many such fairs throughout the country that pay homage to Shakespeare's era with costumes, shows, craft vendors and general revelry.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2014
James Gummer is no ordinary drummer. Not only does he perform in an all- percussion show called the Drum Runners, he also will be playing for the jousts and the chess game at this year's Maryland Renaissance Festival, opening Saturday and running through Oct. 19 in Crownsville. "I like working for the Renaissance Festival because there are so many great performers there," said Gummer, 41. "And I feel like I've grown a lot from being around them. " Gummer, a resident of Perry Hall, has been participating in the festival for 17 years and has no intention of stopping any time soon.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | September 6, 2009
For someone who spends so much time indulging in fantastical merriments, Paula Peterka sure has her feet on the ground. Over the past 17 years, Peterka, a Crownsville wife and mother, has played ever more elaborate roles in the annual medieval pretend-a-thon known as the Maryland Renaissance Festival: wayward juggler, camp follower, a social-climbing countess named Margaret Donnington, even Anne of Cleves, the fourth wife of King Henry VIII. But when it came time to be wed in her own life, she was as real as a leg of mutton.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | August 22, 2002
In the basement of Oella Mill - through the chain-link fence and down steep, rickety steps, beyond the gaping concrete doorway and just around the corner from the half-finished walls - is a fantasy-fed factory where jousting and dragons are part of daily life. But the brothers who run it don't deal in dreams. They deal mostly in weapons. Inside, in the damp, stifling heat, Kerry and Matt Stagmer hammer swords from sheets of steel, wrap rapier handles in leather, forge medieval-style armor and piece together intricate jewelry from platinum and gold.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun reporter | August 26, 2006
If ye desireth to dine on turkey legs or see noble knights joust on the field of honor, get thee to the Maryland Renaissance Festival. Today marks the start of the 30th anniversary of the event, which runs weekends in Crownsville through Oct. 22. If you go The Maryland Renaissance Festival opens today and runs from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. weekends and Labor Day through Oct. 22. Tickets are $17 for adults, $15 for seniors, $8 for those ages 7-15 and free for...
FEATURES
By Will Hylton 3/8 3/8 | October 11, 1991
AT THE ENTRANCE to the Maryland Renaissance Festival, the sign above the gaping arches reads: "Prepare thyself for merriment." Would-be sorcerers and wizards adorned in capes, gowns and hats lose their urban identities for a day as they arrive to admire minstrels, dance in the square or try their hand at ax throwing.And this weekend, as on all others, after a day spent mingling with actors dressed as knights, ladies, lords and beggars, visitors also will pass sign that says "Until another day, fare thee well."
NEWS
By [LIZ ATWOOD] | September 2, 2007
Fred Nelson is beginning his sixth season portraying King Henry VIII in the imaginary village of Revel Grove at the Maryland Renaissance Festival. The festival runs weekends through Oct. 21 in Crownsville. Outside of Revel Grove, Nelson has acted in several other venues, most recently in the title role of The Nerd at Baltimore's Audrey Herman Spotlighters Theatre. He is a Glen Burnie-based video editor and voiceover announcer for several national TV networks and corporate clients. His PBS documentary 9 to 5 No Longer airs nationally this fall.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY and ANNIE LINSKEY,SUN REPORTER | October 21, 2005
David Duvall volunteered from the audience for what he thought would be a harmless stunt at the Maryland Renaissance Festival. He let a member of a flame-throwing act put protective gel on his shaved head and light it on fire. Just an act. But the flames singed him and somehow jumped to the face of his 2-year-old daughter, Autumn, who was standing beside him. The two were rushed to a nearby hospital, where they were treated; Autumn suffered second-degree burns. Yesterday, the Anne Arundel County Fire Department opened an investigation into the incident and ordered the festival to stop using any fire in performances at the Crownsville grounds, said Lt. Frank Fennell, a spokesman for the county fire marshal.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
Organizers of the Maryland Renaissance Festival have said for years they might eventually move from the event's current home in Crownsville, but that possibility has grown since the festival's president said this month he has another property under consideration. Jules Smith, president of the company that runs the popular festival, wouldn't share details but has said the site is on a major highway with more fields and woods than the current location. Smith said he's been considering a move for at least seven years, dating to when his lease on the current site was close to expiring.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2010
The Maryland Renaissance Festival opens Saturday to the delight of bikers and crafters, Ph.D.s and preschoolers, bachelorette partiers and IT geeks, period-music scholars and mead guzzlers. If it seems hard to figure why a pretend 16th-century English village draws such a diverse crowd, try separating the professional pretenders from the amateurs. Even the people who put on the annual event in Crownsville have trouble with that one since so many patrons come in costume or rent Renaissance get-ups at the fair.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | September 6, 2009
For someone who spends so much time indulging in fantastical merriments, Paula Peterka sure has her feet on the ground. During the past 17 years, Peterka, a Crownsville wife and mother, has played ever more elaborate roles in the annual medieval pretend-a-thon known as the Maryland Renaissance Festival: wayward juggler, camp follower, a social-climbing countess named Margaret Donnington, even Anne of Cleves, the fourth wife of King Henry VIII. But when it came time to be wed in her own life, she was as real as a leg of mutton.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | September 6, 2009
For someone who spends so much time indulging in fantastical merriments, Paula Peterka sure has her feet on the ground. Over the past 17 years, Peterka, a Crownsville wife and mother, has played ever more elaborate roles in the annual medieval pretend-a-thon known as the Maryland Renaissance Festival: wayward juggler, camp follower, a social-climbing countess named Margaret Donnington, even Anne of Cleves, the fourth wife of King Henry VIII. But when it came time to be wed in her own life, she was as real as a leg of mutton.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | August 31, 2009
When Nick Roberts went to his first Maryland Renaissance Festival four years ago, and took up the mallet for the "feat of strength" known as Thor's Hammer, he could barely drive the metal disk halfway up the tower toward the bell. Sunday, the Centreville, Va., native, who goes to the fair every year, heaved and grunted like a woodsman felling trees, ringing the bell eight times out of 10 as his fiancee, Tasha Harris, looked on. "I've been working out a bit," said Roberts, sweating under the afternoon sun that shone on about 13,000 boot- and bodice-clad revelers on Day 2 of the annual fair, which opened Saturday in Crownsville and runs every weekend through Oct. 25. "It helps you raise your game."
NEWS
By [LIZ ATWOOD] | September 2, 2007
Fred Nelson is beginning his sixth season portraying King Henry VIII in the imaginary village of Revel Grove at the Maryland Renaissance Festival. The festival runs weekends through Oct. 21 in Crownsville. Outside of Revel Grove, Nelson has acted in several other venues, most recently in the title role of The Nerd at Baltimore's Audrey Herman Spotlighters Theatre. He is a Glen Burnie-based video editor and voiceover announcer for several national TV networks and corporate clients. His PBS documentary 9 to 5 No Longer airs nationally this fall.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Sun Staff Writer | August 28, 1994
Rogues, wenches, monks, fair maidens, outlaws, squires, princes and princesses -- all oblivious to the heat -- sashayed about the muddy, straw-covered streets of the 16th-century Tudor English village as a group of peasants danced with abandon near the town square.Visitors to this temporary land of merriment and mayhem, re-created in Anne Arundel County, were respectfully addressed milady, milord, lass or lad yesterday -- as Maryland Renaissance Festival tradition dictates -- by decree of the king and queen.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | August 31, 2009
When Nick Roberts went to his first Maryland Renaissance Festival four years ago, and took up the mallet for the "feat of strength" known as Thor's Hammer, he could barely drive the metal disk halfway up the tower toward the bell. Sunday, the Centreville, Va., native, who goes to the fair every year, heaved and grunted like a woodsman felling trees, ringing the bell eight times out of 10 as his fiancee, Tasha Harris, looked on. "I've been working out a bit," said Roberts, sweating under the afternoon sun that shone on about 13,000 boot- and bodice-clad revelers on Day 2 of the annual fair, which opened Saturday in Crownsville and runs every weekend through Oct. 25. "It helps you raise your game."
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun reporter | August 26, 2006
If ye desireth to dine on turkey legs or see noble knights joust on the field of honor, get thee to the Maryland Renaissance Festival. Today marks the start of the 30th anniversary of the event, which runs weekends in Crownsville through Oct. 22. If you go The Maryland Renaissance Festival opens today and runs from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. weekends and Labor Day through Oct. 22. Tickets are $17 for adults, $15 for seniors, $8 for those ages 7-15 and free for...
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY and ANNIE LINSKEY,SUN REPORTER | October 21, 2005
David Duvall volunteered from the audience for what he thought would be a harmless stunt at the Maryland Renaissance Festival. He let a member of a flame-throwing act put protective gel on his shaved head and light it on fire. Just an act. But the flames singed him and somehow jumped to the face of his 2-year-old daughter, Autumn, who was standing beside him. The two were rushed to a nearby hospital, where they were treated; Autumn suffered second-degree burns. Yesterday, the Anne Arundel County Fire Department opened an investigation into the incident and ordered the festival to stop using any fire in performances at the Crownsville grounds, said Lt. Frank Fennell, a spokesman for the county fire marshal.
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