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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 6, 1998
A 22-year-old man remained in a coma yesterday after being struck by a Maryland Rail Commuter service train Friday night in Elkridge, Howard County police said.The man, whose name withheld until relatives were notified, was walking with an unidentified 21-year-old woman on the tracks near Levering Avenue and Lawyers Hill Road about 9: 15 p.m. when he was hit by the Washington-bound train.Police said the couple apparently stepped off the tracks, onto a narrow strip on the edge of a 60-foot drop, after the engineer sounded a warning horn.
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NEWS
February 19, 2009
It didn't take long for the first wave of the $3.8 billion stimulus money bound for Maryland to get spent. Gov. Martin O'Malley yesterday announced a series of transportation improvements, from new buses to street repair, that should create, or at least retain, thousands of jobs as contractors gear up for a busier spring. As transportation projects go, the list is duller than a block of reinforced concrete. No major new projects, no ambitious expansions and certainly no "Bridges to Nowhere."
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NEWS
June 10, 1996
Police logJessup: 9000 block of Dorsey Run Road: A blue 1993 Plymouth Voyager with Maryland tags 501510M was stolen Thursday.Scaggsville: Route 216/U.S. 29: A 1988 Chevrolet S-10 pickup truck with Maryland tags 08C-337 was stolen from the parking lot of the Maryland Rail Commuter service train station Thursday.Pub Date: 6/10/96
NEWS
November 30, 2008
A major criticism of a government-financed stimulus package that relies on spending huge sums to rebuild the nation's public infrastructure is the lag between the measure's passage and the resulting jobs. Maryland Transportation Secretary John D. Porcari has good reason to think that's not much of a problem this time around. That's because he's got a stack of more than $310 million worth of transportation-related projects ready to go. In some cases, there are jobs that might literally be created within hours of the bill's enactment - resurfacing contracts, for instance, that can be immediately expanded to restore miles of aging highway.
NEWS
December 11, 2002
Maryland Rail Commuter train service on the Brunswick and Camden lines will be altered today because of a forecast of a winter ice storm, Maryland Transportation Administration officials announced yesterday. With freezing rain and ice accumulations expected, only MARC trains with an "S" at the top of their displays will operate. The Penn Line will operate on a regular schedule, but its runs may be reduced later depending on the path and severity of the storm, officials said. A severe storm can potentially result in extensive delays.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 9, 2003
All morning trains to Washington on the Maryland Rail Commuter Camden and Brunswick lines will have designated "quiet cars" beginning Monday, the state announced yesterday. MARC Penn Line trains through the 8:10 a.m. departure have quiet cars. Starting Monday, Penn Line train 424, which leaves Washington at 3:34 p.m. for Baltimore, will become the first afternoon train with a quiet car. MARC began designating quiet cars on some trains in January, and they proved popular. Passengers on a quiet car, usually the last car on a train, are asked to turn off cell phones and pagers and keep conversations hushed.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 21, 2005
Four CSX train cars carrying new automobiles derailed yesterday afternoon in Jessup, blocking passengers on the Camden MARC train commuter line during rush hour, a railroad spokeswoman said. Buses picked up passengers at the Dorsey or Savage Maryland Rail Commuter stations and drove them to their destinations north or south of Jessup, said a spokesman for the Maryland Transit Administration. Misty Skipper of CSX said that an engine was pulling 67 cars into the CSX Jessup Yard when the derailment occurred about 3 p.m. Two of the derailed cars went over an embankment.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | September 12, 1996
A Maryland postal worker who tried to save victims of a deadly rail crash in Silver Spring was named "Hero of the Year" yesterday by the National Association of Letter Carriers.Joan Barr, 31, of Mechanicsville in St. Mary's County was on her way home from work Feb. 16 when she became involved at the scene of the fiery crash of a Maryland Rail Commuter service train and an Amtrak train. Eleven people on the MARC train were killed."I had just punched out and was on my way home when I heard and felt the crash," Barr, a substitute letter carrier in Silver Spring, said yesterday.
NEWS
December 18, 1991
Maryland's commuter rail service is drowning in its own success. So many people are riding the rails between Baltimore and Washington and from Western Maryland to Washington that the Maryland Rail Commuter system (MARC) can't keep up with demand, which has risen 150 percent in five years. On-time service is down; trains are bypassing stations because cars are jammed-packed with passengers. The rail line is in a bind.Help, happily, is on the way. Leased locomotives are being brought on line.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Staff Writer | December 16, 1992
Efforts to lure a magnetic levitation train to Maryland appear to be headed back on track.Gov. William Donald Schaefer has dropped his opposition to a study of a possible Baltimore-Washington maglev system, aides said yesterday. That clears the way for approval of the state's $200,000 share of the $900,000 study by the Board of Public Works this morning.Maglev trains are designed to ride on a cushion of magnetism and travel at speeds of 300 mph or higher. They have operated on test tracks in Europe and Japan.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 21, 2005
Four CSX train cars carrying new automobiles derailed yesterday afternoon in Jessup, blocking passengers on the Camden MARC train commuter line during rush hour, a railroad spokeswoman said. Buses picked up passengers at the Dorsey or Savage Maryland Rail Commuter stations and drove them to their destinations north or south of Jessup, said a spokesman for the Maryland Transit Administration. Misty Skipper of CSX said that an engine was pulling 67 cars into the CSX Jessup Yard when the derailment occurred about 3 p.m. Two of the derailed cars went over an embankment.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 9, 2003
All morning trains to Washington on the Maryland Rail Commuter Camden and Brunswick lines will have designated "quiet cars" beginning Monday, the state announced yesterday. MARC Penn Line trains through the 8:10 a.m. departure have quiet cars. Starting Monday, Penn Line train 424, which leaves Washington at 3:34 p.m. for Baltimore, will become the first afternoon train with a quiet car. MARC began designating quiet cars on some trains in January, and they proved popular. Passengers on a quiet car, usually the last car on a train, are asked to turn off cell phones and pagers and keep conversations hushed.
NEWS
December 11, 2002
Maryland Rail Commuter train service on the Brunswick and Camden lines will be altered today because of a forecast of a winter ice storm, Maryland Transportation Administration officials announced yesterday. With freezing rain and ice accumulations expected, only MARC trains with an "S" at the top of their displays will operate. The Penn Line will operate on a regular schedule, but its runs may be reduced later depending on the path and severity of the storm, officials said. A severe storm can potentially result in extensive delays.
BUSINESS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2000
Crystal Coleman knew something was wrong with her taxes. Though she had had them prepared professionally, the refund didn't seem large enough. Yesterday morning, her tax records in hand, the 45-year-old West Baltimore resident boarded a Maryland Rail Commuter service train bound for Washington wondering whether to call the government for help. But she wouldn't have to. On the way to her job as a community supervision officer for the Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency for the District of Columbia, she was surprised to hear the conductor announce that representatives of the Internal Revenue Service would be providing free tax help right on the train.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 6, 1998
A 22-year-old man remained in a coma yesterday after being struck by a Maryland Rail Commuter service train Friday night in Elkridge, Howard County police said.The man, whose name withheld until relatives were notified, was walking with an unidentified 21-year-old woman on the tracks near Levering Avenue and Lawyers Hill Road about 9: 15 p.m. when he was hit by the Washington-bound train.Police said the couple apparently stepped off the tracks, onto a narrow strip on the edge of a 60-foot drop, after the engineer sounded a warning horn.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | June 29, 1998
An article about transportation improvements in Odenton in yesterday's edition of The Sun in Anne Arundel incorrectly identified the state agency that awarded the county a grant for some of the work.The Mass Transit Administration gave the county $300,000 to make improvements around the Odenton Maryland Rail Commuter (MARC) station.The Sun regrets the error.With the opening of a newly widened and landscaped Piney Orchard Parkway last week, 30-year-old plans for a town center in Odenton finally became tangible.
NEWS
May 10, 1991
The joys of living in scenic Western Maryland already have proved alluring to thousands of long-distance commuters who make their way to work in Washington or Baltimore on a daily basis. But now there is a chance to take these commuters off the clogged interstates and put them on comfortable and relaxing rail trains instead.A state study shows large potential ridership for commuter-rail lines running from Frederick, Hagerstown and Cumberland to Washington, D.C. Simply starting a Frederick-to-Point of Rocks line would generate 2,300 riders a day, say transportation officials.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen | November 28, 1991
Maryland travelers have reason to give thanks for the $151 billion, six-year highway and transit legislation approved by Congress yesterday -- about 2.7 billion reasons, to be exact.The bill, which President Bush is expected to sign, passed the House 372-47 early yesterday morning and the Senate 79-8 in the afternoon. It will finance $1.9 billion in highway construction projects and provide about $800 million for mass transit in Maryland.But state transportation officials warned that Maryland could lose out on nearly a third of that money because the state'sailing Transportation Trust Fund might not be able to provide enough matching dollars.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1997
Culminating nearly a year of negotiations that one top state official said had "soap opera-like qualities," Maryland gave its blessing yesterday to CSX and Norfolk Southern's $10.2 billion plan to take over Conrail.During a ceremony at Dundalk Marine Terminal attended by several hundred people, Gov. Parris N. Glendening praised the deal, saying it assures continued commuter rail service, infrastructure improvements, more jobs in Western Maryland and, perhaps most importantly, competition between two Class I railroads.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | September 12, 1996
A Maryland postal worker who tried to save victims of a deadly rail crash in Silver Spring was named "Hero of the Year" yesterday by the National Association of Letter Carriers.Joan Barr, 31, of Mechanicsville in St. Mary's County was on her way home from work Feb. 16 when she became involved at the scene of the fiery crash of a Maryland Rail Commuter service train and an Amtrak train. Eleven people on the MARC train were killed."I had just punched out and was on my way home when I heard and felt the crash," Barr, a substitute letter carrier in Silver Spring, said yesterday.
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