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NEWS
May 25, 1996
MARYLAND PUBLIC Television is the fourth largest producer of programming for public TV nationwide, creating such well-regarded series as Louis Rukeyser's "Wall Street Week." Yet never has a show born in Maryland opened with the kind of hype surrounding "Kratts' Creatures," a new series for pre-teens."Kratts' Creatures" might best be described as the old Marlon Perkins adventure series made hip for the MTV generation. It follows brothers Chris and Martin Kratt as they cross the globe via backpack, surfboard and mountain bike to explore the animal kingdom.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
Democrat Anthony G. Brown and Republican Larry Hogan traded accusations of deception Tuesday in their first debate before the Nov. 4 election for governor. The rivals clashed repeatedly over social issues, education, the environment and Maryland's economy. Hogan bristled at allegations in Brown's campaign ads about his position on abortion and birth control. "He says that I oppose abortion even in the cases of rape and incest, and that I want to take away birth control. That is just absolutely not true," Hogan said.
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NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 3, 1996
Robert J. Shuman, a former cable TV executive known for his skill in raising and managing money, will be named today as the new president of Maryland Public Television, a move designed to help the network thrive in an era of dwindling government financing.Shuman, 51, of Potomac, moves to MPT after six years at Civic Network Communications Inc., a Washington company that uses television to provide career development training for community leaders.He fills a job left vacant by the firing last October of Raymond K. K. Ho.One of the founders of the Learning Channel, Shuman also brings to the job an extensive background in educational and community television.
NEWS
September 17, 2014
Our words weren't exactly, "Let's put on a show," but they could have been. Maryland Public Television is forever grateful to PBS, the "Great Performances" series and our colleagues at WNET in New York for responding to our 2012 invitation to join us in putting on a show to celebrate the 200th anniversary of The Star-Spangled Banner in Baltimore in 2014. For two hours last Saturday night and with the tremendous support of the Maryland War of 1812 Bicentennial Commission, Dick Clark Productions, Pier Six , Star-Spangled 200, Inc., The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, Fort McHenry, the National Park Service and others, we were pleased to present "Star-Spangled Spectacular: Bicentennial of Our National Anthem" as a national MPT production for the PBS system.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2012
Maryland Public Television said Wednesday that Steven J. Schupak, its senior vice president, has been named chief content officer. Schupak, who joined MPT in 2003, oversees the development, production, licensing and national distribution of the station's programs, among other responsibilities. Schupak is responsible for the station's local productions, including "Outdoors Maryland" and "State Circle. " During his tenure, MPT has earned 26 Emmy Awards and other industry honors for its productions.
NEWS
November 15, 1997
WHEN RAYMOND K. K. HO was fired two years ago from Maryland Public Television, one of the knocks against the controversial president was that he splurged on shows with a national or international focus, but neglected the folks at home.Monday will bring the latest example of a new era at MPT when it rolls out a weeknight news program called Newsnight Maryland. It is the most ambitious venture to date under Mr. Ho's successor, Robert J. Shuman.The show symbolizes the change at the top of the state's public TV station, from Mr. Ho, who had the air of a tent-revival preacher, to Mr. Shuman, a more contemplative executive from Potomac who founded The Learning Channel on cable.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2011
For the last two weeks, I have done everything I could to get people to watch "The Learning," an illuminating documentary about the lives of four Filipina teachers who are recruited to teach in Baltimore City Schools. I have blogged, and here's a link to that. I have gone on WYPR radio to talk about it, and here's a link to that. I am upset that Maryland Public Television is airing at 10:30 tonight (Sept. 25) on its digital channel 22.2 only. It debuted Tuesday night on public televisions  stations nationwide.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | June 27, 2002
Just days before the debut of the new version of Wall Street Week With Fortune, the people out at Maryland Public Television's Owings Mills studios say they're too busy to be nervous. "I don't start getting jitters until a half-hour before we go on the air," says John T. Potthast, MPT's senior vice president for content enterprises, as he sits inside a bustling control room. A graphic artist nearby is manipulating images on one of 24 television screens before him, superimposing a series of faces over the head of a strapping male model from the cover of a fitness magazine - first actor David Hasselhoff, then MPT President and CEO Robert J. Shuman, then that of a golden retriever.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2011
Don't let your feelings one way or the other about New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie stop you from thinking dispassionately about what he has to say about the perils of state-run public television systems like the one we have in Maryland. Christie, a conservative, has been trying to get his state out of the public television business in an effort to cut ballooning state government costs. Maryland has most or all of the same kinds of money problems. And like New Jersey, Maryland is one of the states where the state, not a non-profit citizens group, holds the license, provides funds and controls content on the statewide public television operation.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 29, 1996
Beginning Nov. 2, parents will be able to watch PBS with their children in the afternoon, then hustle on down to the library that night and help them read more about it.If spending more time with the characters and concepts introduced daily to kids on public television is a good thing, then Maryland Public Television's new "Ready to Learn Library Reading Project" is just what the doctor -- or the educator -- ordered.Presented during a luncheon at Baltimore's Clarion Hotel Wednesday as a groundbreaking partnership between MPT and Maryland's public library systems, the project will place reading stations at branches in Maryland's 23 counties and Baltimore City.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | June 6, 2014
The only statewide broadcast of the four Republican candidates for governor debating will air Friday night at 7 on Maryland Public Television. Harford County Executive David R. Craig, Del. Ron George of Anne Arundel County, former Ehrlich administration official Larry Hogan and Charles County conservative activist Charles Lollar taped the 60-minute debate Monday at the MPT studios. The four previously debated last Saturday in Salisbury, but that encounter was televised only on the Eastern Shore.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | June 2, 2014
The three Democratic candidates for governor will all meet for their second televised debate Monday night on Maryland Public Television and WBAL-TV, giving voters their final opportunity to see them confront each other on television. Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler and Del. Heather R. Mizeur will go on at 7 p.m. in a debate hosted by MPT's Jeff Salkin. The three met last month in a televised debate at the University of Maryland College Park in an exchange that included lively confrontations between Brown and Gansler while Mizeur largely stayed above the fray.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
Last week, I thought Lt. Governor Anthony Brown was the loser among Democratic candidates for not showing up at WBFF's TV debate. And he was. But he was an even bigger loser Monday in showing up for the debate on Maryland Public Television. No wonder he doesn't want to do these TV debates. It's not just incumbency; he's terrible on television. His answers are just this side of bureaucratic doublespeak - exactly the rhetoric of Washington and Annapolis unaccountability that makes some voters want to scream.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2014
From Rep. Elijah E. Cummings playing a leading role in televised hearings on American deaths in Benghazi, to the Game Show Network visiting a Baltimore church to play matchmaker for a member of the congregation, there is going to be a distinct local flavor to summertime TV this year. Here are 10 shows, stories and trends to look for in and on Baltimore television in coming weeks - for better or worse. “It Takes a Church” debuts at 9 p.m. Thursday on GSN. The reality-TV series hosted by gospel singer Natalie Grant visits a different church each week and, with the help of the pastor and congregation members, plays the dating game.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
The three Democrats competing to be Maryland's next governor will face each other tonight in the first televised debate of the campaign. Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler and Del. Heather Mizeur will field questions from a panel of journalists during the hour-long debate over the state's economy, how to expand business, improve job creation, and solve transportation woes, among other issues. It will be held at 7 p.m. at the University of Maryland and broadcast in Baltimore on Maryland Public Television.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2014
Republican candidates for Maryland governor criticized the O'Malley administration - but rarely each other - in a tame radio debate today that touched on the state's handgun permit law and 2013 death penalty repeal. The 60-minute, morning debate was broadcast and streamed live on WBAL radio. Host Jimmy Mathis solicited questions from listeners. The four candidates -- Harford County Executive David R. Craig , Del. Ron George of Annapolis, former Ehrlich administration official Larry Hogan and Charles County business executive Charles Lollar -- spent much of the debate drawing contrasts between their respective positions and those of Gov. Martin O'Malley, who is prevented by term limits from running again.
FEATURES
By SUN STAFF | August 23, 1998
When it comes to guessing which PBS stations produce the most programs,the big ones shouldn't be tough to figure.Boston's WGBH? Of course. It's got "Masterpiece Theater," "Mystery" and "Frontline," not to mention "The American Experience."New York's WNET? Makes sense. First, it's in New York, where everything's big. And second, it's responsible for "Great Performances."Washington's WETA? Naturally, considering it's got Ken Burns among its stable of stars.But don't forget Maryland Public Television.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and Michael Dresser and David Zurawik and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | October 20, 1995
The direction of public television in Maryland could be decided Monday when the state commission that runs the network meets to resolve a bitter, behind-the-scenes battle over the future of its controversial president, Raymond K. K. Ho.Mr. Ho, whose performance has been under scrutiny for months, may have forced the hand of the Maryland Public Broadcasting Commission by going public with a series of accusations against Gov. Parris N. Glendening and commission Chairman David H. Nevins."The Monday meeting is certainly a turning point in the history of Maryland Public Television," said Mr. Ho, who has been MPT's president for nine years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
What a sorry state of affairs I discovered last week when I started reporting the TV aspect of the first Democratic gubernatorial debate. I quickly came to understand that Baltimoreans would not be seeing the event, which will be staged Wednesday at the University of Maryland, College Park and produced by WRC-TV, the NBC-owned station in Washington. But how could that be, especially with three candidates hardly known in the city: Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler and Del. Heather R. Mizeur?
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
Even though next week's first gubernatorial debate is being co-hosted by two taxpayer-funded state universities, Baltimore viewers are not scheduled to be able to see it. The event featuring Democratic candidates Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler and Del. Heather R. Mizeur is scheduled for 7 p.m. May 7 at the University of Maryland, College Park and will be broadcast live on Washington's NBC-owned station, WRC-TV (Channel...
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